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Roone Arledge

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2003 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
RooneRoone A Memoir Roone Arledge HarperCollins: 432 pp., $25.95 * As he was dying of the cancer that had returned after eight years, Roone Arledge worked on the manuscript of his memoir every day, succumbing to the illness last December, at age 71. Although he didn't live to see the publication of "Roone," a fascinating, incisive chronicle of his four decades in network television, his legacy is about as impressive as anyone could hope for.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2003 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
RooneRoone A Memoir Roone Arledge HarperCollins: 432 pp., $25.95 * As he was dying of the cancer that had returned after eight years, Roone Arledge worked on the manuscript of his memoir every day, succumbing to the illness last December, at age 71. Although he didn't live to see the publication of "Roone," a fascinating, incisive chronicle of his four decades in network television, his legacy is about as impressive as anyone could hope for.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1992 | JANE HALL, Jane Hall is a Times staff writer. and
When Roone Arledge was about to be named president of ABC News in 1977, Ted Koppel and Peter Jennings paid a special call on the president of the network, Fred Pierce. "Peter and I went over to talk to Pierce to try to convince him that he was making a terrible mistake," Koppel recalled during a recent interview. Arledge, who wore safari jackets and palled around with sportscasters, was credited with revolutionizing TV coverage of the Olympics and other sports events as the head of ABC Sports.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2002 | Elizabeth Jensen, Times Staff Writer
Roone Arledge was eulogized Monday by many of the broadcasters he made famous in his tenure overseeing ABC News and ABC Sports. They remembered him less for his accomplishments that transformed television than for his exuberant approach to the business and the people who surrounded him. Arledge, who brought show business to televised news and sports in four decades at ABC and created both "Monday Night Football" and "Nightline," died Thursday in New York of complications from cancer. He was 71.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2002 | Elizabeth Jensen, Times Staff Writer
Roone Arledge was eulogized Monday by many of the broadcasters he made famous in his tenure overseeing ABC News and ABC Sports. They remembered him less for his accomplishments that transformed television than for his exuberant approach to the business and the people who surrounded him. Arledge, who brought show business to televised news and sports in four decades at ABC and created both "Monday Night Football" and "Nightline," died Thursday in New York of complications from cancer. He was 71.
SPORTS
June 26, 1986
Howard Cosell said Wednesday at the trial of the USFL's $1.69-billion antitrust suit against the NFL that he had been told by his former boss at ABC that NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle was unhappy with the network for giving the USFL a television contract. Cosell's testimony contradicted earlier testimony from Roone Arledge, who said Rozelle had never expressed displeasure over the network doing business with the USFL.
SPORTS
May 17, 1988 | Jim Murray
When Roone Arledge was presiding, high, wide and handsome, over ABC network sports, Jim Spence was widely perceived in the media as his hatchet man. Well, now, he's buried the hatchet. In Roone. While he's at it, he takes a swipe at a few other scalps, too, most notably Howard Cosell's. President Reagan called them "kiss-and-tell" books. They have become a phenomenon of our age. They probably originated with sports books.
SPORTS
May 4, 1986 | Associated Press
Roone Arledge says it was just a casual conversation, months before the 1984 Summer Olympics, when he and Peter Ueberroth talked about the job of president of ABC Sports. "He said he might be interested, but then there was no follow-up because the baseball thing came up," Arledge said. "It was not a serious, long discussion, just a passing conversation." After guiding the Los Angeles Games to widespread acclaim and financial success, Ueberroth became commissioner of baseball in 1985.
SPORTS
August 3, 1987 | LARRY STEWART, Times Staff Writer
Channel 2 will announce today that it has hired former ABC sportscaster Jim Lampley as a replacement for departed sports anchor Jim Hill. A CBS source said Lampley has agreed to a three-year contract. Reportedly, it will pay about $700,000 per year, which was what Lampley made with ABC. Channel 2 had offered Hill $600,000 to stay, but Channel 7 reportedly offered considerably more. In a separate arrangement, Lampley will also work for CBS Sports as a play-by-play announcer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2002 | Brian Lowry, Times Staff Writer
Word of Roone Arledge's death came Thursday as the news division he built was basking in its latest ratings coup -- Diane Sawyer's exclusive interview the night before, filled with talk of drug use and marital discord, with singer Whitney Houston.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2002 | Howard Rosenberg, Times Staff Writer
The Wide World of Roone has just gotten wider. What is it about eulogies? Why can't we celebrate the dead for who they were instead of for who they weren't? It's as if the reality of their lives was not good enough, making it necessary to wrap them in gauzy, feel-good fantasy. That was true for Princess Diana and John F. Kennedy Jr. Only after she died did we learn from teary media mourners that Diana was America's "princess of hearts."
SPORTS
December 6, 2002 | LARRY STEWART
One of Roone Arledge's closest friends was Ed Hookstratten, the powerful Beverly Hills broadcast agent whose clientele includes Tom Brokaw, Vin Scully, Dick Enberg and many more of their ilk. Arledge, the former ABC Sports and ABC News president, died Thursday at 71 of complications from cancer. Hookstratten knew him as well as anyone. "There are certain people who play in another league," Hookstratten said. "Sandy Koufax played baseball in another league.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2002 | Brian Lowry, Times Staff Writer
Word of Roone Arledge's death came Thursday as the news division he built was basking in its latest ratings coup -- Diane Sawyer's exclusive interview the night before, filled with talk of drug use and marital discord, with singer Whitney Houston.
SPORTS
December 6, 2002 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
When Roone Arledge and his young assistant, Dick Ebersol, finally left the ABC studios in Munich, West Germany, on the morning of Sept. 5, 1972, the only people still left inside were janitors, sweeping floors. It was just before dawn. Just a few hours before, Mark Spitz had won his seventh gold medal at the Olympic swimming pool. Arledge and Ebersol went outside and, under a dark night sky, lingered for perhaps 20 minutes, reveling in the Olympic action and ABC's coverage.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1998 | TOM SHALES, THE WASHINGTON POST
Some people laughed when Roone Arledge, Mr. TV Sports, took over as president of ABC News. Some jeered. A few of us critics saw it as another sign of decline and fall. Well, we were wrong. Now Arledge, 66, has officially retired as chief executive of ABC News and we can see his legacy is an awesome one, and that how ever he started out, he became a giant.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a storied 21-year tenure that allowed ABC to proclaim "More Americans get their news from ABC News than any other source," ABC News Chairman Roone Arledge will yield daily oversight of that division Monday to David Westin, who became its president in March, 1997. Arledge is generally credited as the mastermind behind such venerable network franchises as "Monday Night Football" (introduced during his tenure running ABC Sports) and the award-winning late-night news program "Nightline."
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC News President Roone Arledge on Thursday proposed major changes in the way the networks make time for serious news shows--including documentaries, presidential debates and national political party conventions. Arledge, who spoke after receiving a lifetime achievement award from the Center for Communication, suggested that the networks occasionally replace entertainment shows that are suffering in the ratings with serious news documentaries.
SPORTS
December 6, 2002 | LARRY STEWART
One of Roone Arledge's closest friends was Ed Hookstratten, the powerful Beverly Hills broadcast agent whose clientele includes Tom Brokaw, Vin Scully, Dick Enberg and many more of their ilk. Arledge, the former ABC Sports and ABC News president, died Thursday at 71 of complications from cancer. Hookstratten knew him as well as anyone. "There are certain people who play in another league," Hookstratten said. "Sandy Koufax played baseball in another league.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC News President Roone Arledge on Thursday proposed major changes in the way the networks make time for serious news shows--including documentaries, presidential debates and national political party conventions. Arledge, who spoke after receiving a lifetime achievement award from the Center for Communication, suggested that the networks occasionally replace entertainment shows that are suffering in the ratings with serious news documentaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1994 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC News President Roone Arledge acknowledged Tuesday that the network is kicking off its documentary-style series "Turning Point" with an hour about Charles Manson and his followers in hopes of bringing viewers into the tent. Putting the Manson show first, Arledge told a news conference here, "was a pragmatic and deliberate act on our part. It is not necessarily representative of all the areas we want to cover. But we do want people to know the show is on the air."
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