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Roosevelt Douglas

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February 27, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosie Douglas is proud of his past. He delights in telling crowds about trying to use the toilet while in leg irons and handcuffs on the Air Canada flight out of Montreal after he was deported in the 1970s for leading black power protests. In the past he has labeled the U.S. an imperialist enemy and boasts in speeches of his personal contacts with Libya, Iraq and Cuba--and the fact that those links helped earn him a 15-year ban from U.S. soil.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Roosevelt "Rosie" Douglas of Dominica, a former Marxist who spent 18 months in a Canadian jail for his part in destructive black power demonstrations three decades ago, has died unexpectedly, government officials announced. Douglas, who returned Saturday from a Caribbean leaders' summit in Jamaica, died Sunday morning of an apparent heart attack at his home in Portsmouth, about 30 miles from the capital city of Roseau. He would have been 58 on Oct. 15.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Roosevelt "Rosie" Douglas of Dominica, a former Marxist who spent 18 months in a Canadian jail for his part in destructive black power demonstrations three decades ago, has died unexpectedly, government officials announced. Douglas, who returned Saturday from a Caribbean leaders' summit in Jamaica, died Sunday morning of an apparent heart attack at his home in Portsmouth, about 30 miles from the capital city of Roseau. He would have been 58 on Oct. 15.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosie Douglas is proud of his past. He delights in telling crowds about trying to use the toilet while in leg irons and handcuffs on the Air Canada flight out of Montreal after he was deported in the 1970s for leading black power protests. In the past he has labeled the U.S. an imperialist enemy and boasts in speeches of his personal contacts with Libya, Iraq and Cuba--and the fact that those links helped earn him a 15-year ban from U.S. soil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2004 | From Associated Press
Prime Minister Pierre Charles of the Caribbean island of Dominica, a critic of some U.S. policies, died Tuesday night of an apparent heart attack, hospital officials said. He was 49. Charles, who had recently been on a brief leave of absence because of heart problems, was pronounced dead at Princess Margaret Hospital. Tourism Minister Charles Savarin said Charles was leaving his office after a Cabinet meeting Tuesday night when he complained of chest pains and collapsed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1988 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, Times Staff Writer
Next month, Inglewood voters will confront two of the most powerful issues in local politics: police and taxes. Proposition BB on the Nov. 8 ballot asks voters to approve a proposed police benefit assessment district to add 20 officers to the Police Department at a first-year cost of $1.4 million.
NEWS
December 21, 1990 | JOSEPH N. BELL
I didn't know Milli Vanilli from the Righteous Brothers, so I don't know why I consumed all the stories about the scam these two men ran on a lot of doting fans and the pop music industry. But I did--rather, I guess, for the same reasons I look at freeway accidents or cop stops. Curiosity. The same curiosity led me to interrogate the young persons I drive to, and from, school occasionally about Milli Vanilli--and the later peccadilloes of the New Kids on the Block.
NEWS
October 31, 1996 | WILLIAM KISSEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It will be slim-pickings for American men this winter if they rely on the offerings shown at the latest round of menswear shows in New York. That's slim, as in tight, form-fitting trousers; clingy, second-skin knit shirts, and pinched-shoulder, single-button sport coats. In other words, everything a guy needs to do a little dance, make a little love, get down tonight, as KC and the Sunshine Band so beautifully put it.
BOOKS
April 13, 2003 | Edward Lazarus, Edward Lazarus is the author of "Closed Chambers: The Rise, Fall and Future of the Modern Supreme Court." He is a lawyer in private practice.
Judicial biographies often tilt toward hagiography. The lives of famous judges, especially Supreme Court justices, are often chronicled by former law clerks turned academics, who approach their subjects with a fondness bordering on reverence. Sharp edges get rounded; criticisms muted; virtues spotlighted for posterity. The results are usually bloodless portraits of the least public members of America's political pantheon. Bruce Allen Murphy's biography of Justice William O.
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