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Rooster

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2009 | Victoria Kim
They are noisy, they drag down property values and disrupt the peace in neighborhoods, and they can carry deadly illnesses. And they sometimes associate with criminals, through no choice of their own. Not to mention the havoc they wreak on sweet early morning slumber. Pity the poor rooster, in some regions decried as public enemy No. 1.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The Morning News' annual Tournament of Books has started its engines. On Tuesday, the ToB announced its lineup of contenders to be named the winner -- actually, the Rooster -- for 2014. Initially conceived as "a goof" that took the college basketball tournament model and filled brackets with books, the ToB has proved both long-lasting and inspirational. While it has been followed by dozens of book-bracket imitators that set up all kinds of reading competitions -- children's books, books about Los Angeles -- the race for the Rooster remains central.
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OPINION
February 8, 2011
An incident in Central California last week was so bizarre that the headlines it generated wouldn't be out of place in a supermarket tabloid next to tales of alien babies and Elvis sightings: "Man Killed by Rooster. " More specifically, one of the feathered contestants in an illegal cockfight in Tulare County, armed with a blade attached to its leg, apparently stabbed 35-year-old Jose Luis Ochoa in the calf, and Ochoa was declared dead of "sharp force injury" two hours later. This isn't the first time someone has died in what is supposed to be blood sport for birds; last summer in Merced, two men got into an argument over a $10 bet, one pulled out a gun and killed the other, and the victim's brother and another man allegedly beat the shooter to death.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Merle Haggard
Ray Price was the mentor and the leader. He was discovered and brought to Columbia Records by Lefty Frizzell, and he made his first record on Columbia with Lefty's band. That was a song called "If You're Ever Lonely Darling. " After that, after he made his debut on Columbia, he gave many other people a chance to do the same thing. He brought Roger Miller to the surface, and he gave Willie Nelson a job in his band. In 1966, I was on tour with Ray down in the states of Texas and Oklahoma, and that was the first time I met Ray. Of course, I was a fan for many years before that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Bob Pool
“Hogwash!” was the cry when Neil, Sierra Madre's pot-bellied pig, got cited for being overweight. Specifically, an animal control officer labeled him a hog, which is illegal to possess in the tiny town northeast of Pasadena. The officer had been sent to the Montecito Avenue neighborhood where the 17-year-old pig lives to investigate reports of a noisy rooster, which is also illegal in Sierra Madre. When she looked over the picket fence next door, past the mailbox painted with a fanciful pig's head, she noticed Neil in the yard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2002 | Dana Parsons
It wasn't exactly the Rose Parade, not with the rooster prancing about or the goat wearing a straw hat. But it was a competition, and they needed judges and, well, I don't have an exciting social life, so ... So I sat there last week in the livestock arena at the Orange County Fair, one of five judges for the annual Barnyard Fashion Parade. If that sounds like easy duty, you try determining under deadline which is more creative--a Holstein wearing a beret or a goat in a wraparound skirt.
MAGAZINE
February 13, 2000
W.R. Turner's letter, with its asinine suggestion that we legalize cockfighting (Jan. 16), states: "If it were put to a vote today, the public would legalize this noble sport." I'm sure the public would vote to send all those immigrants who enjoy cockfighting back where they came from. Charles F. Queenan Encino Turner points out that "millions of chickens are killed daily to feed the population of America" and asks "why should the death of a few thousand in blood sport cause such an uproar?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1996 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun comes up and a rooster crowing "cock-a-doodle-doo" greets the new day. Ahhh. Morning in Chatsworth. "That rooster really drove people crazy," said Lee Shapiro, a Pierce College teacher who used to live in Chatsworth and was awakened daily by the rooster's reveille. He and his neighbors were experiencing a problem well known to those who live urban but wake up rural, creating a legal problem unexpected in a megalopolis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Bob Pool
"Hogwash!" was the cry when Neil, Sierra Madre's beloved pot-bellied pig, was cited for being overweight. Specifically, an animal control officer labeled him a hog, which is illegal to possess in the town northeast of Pasadena. The officer had actually been sent to the Montecito Avenue neighborhood to investigate reports of a noisy rooster, which is also illegal in Sierra Madre. But when she looked over the picket fence into the yard next door, past the mailbox painted with a fanciful pig's head, she noticed Neil rooting around in the dirt.
MAGAZINE
December 29, 1985 | CAROL ANN HOWELL
His namesake is Kaliman, a Mexican comic-book superhero. He's muscular, but skinny. A scroungy yard dog fed on tortillas and masa. Kaliman lives in Villa Comaltitlan, a town of 5,000 in the state of Chiapas in southern Mexico. His home is only a few feet from the river Chalaca, where he sometimes swims. His backyard consists of fruit trees, a well, a pila (or basin); chickens, ducks and turkeys--all running free--and a carpenter shop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
Riverside County officials have euthanized 134 roosters found on a property near the small desert town of Oasis during an investigation into a suspected cockfighting ring, authorities said Saturday. Deputies from the Riverside County Sheriff's Department discovered the roosters, several boxes of blades, a cockfighting ring and a trophy after responding to a report of animal cruelty at the property on Thursday, said Cpl. Joshua Morales, a department spokesman. The roosters had to be euthanized because they were raised to fight and are too aggressive to enter a normal population, Morales said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Bob Pool
“Hogwash!” was the cry when Neil, Sierra Madre's pot-bellied pig, got cited for being overweight. Specifically, an animal control officer labeled him a hog, which is illegal to possess in the tiny town northeast of Pasadena. The officer had been sent to the Montecito Avenue neighborhood where the 17-year-old pig lives to investigate reports of a noisy rooster, which is also illegal in Sierra Madre. When she looked over the picket fence next door, past the mailbox painted with a fanciful pig's head, she noticed Neil in the yard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Bob Pool
"Hogwash!" was the cry when Neil, Sierra Madre's beloved pot-bellied pig, was cited for being overweight. Specifically, an animal control officer labeled him a hog, which is illegal to possess in the town northeast of Pasadena. The officer had actually been sent to the Montecito Avenue neighborhood to investigate reports of a noisy rooster, which is also illegal in Sierra Madre. But when she looked over the picket fence into the yard next door, past the mailbox painted with a fanciful pig's head, she noticed Neil rooting around in the dirt.
SCIENCE
March 18, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Roosters, famously, crow in the early morn -- but scientists don't fully understand why they unleash their voices when they do.  After all, roosters have also been known to make a racket when other animals or birds are about, when a car starts, or when lights turn on in the middle of the night.  So do they crow because they see the morning light, or because they hear other roosters? Or do they have some kind of internal body clock that lets them know that's it's time to unleash their peals?
NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jeff Bridges had to sort through what he calls an "interesting batch of emotions" when the Coen brothers approached him with the idea of playing Rooster Cogburn in "True Grit. " "I said, 'Why do you want to remake that,' you know?" Bridges recalls. "But they were thinking about the book and not the movie, which was a relief for me. I didn't want to be emulating John Wayne. Who would?" He pauses, shakes his head and lets out a laugh. "Who could?" Bridges made the whiskey-soaked marshal enough of his own man to win an Oscar nomination, making Cogburn the 16th film character to earn more than one actor love from academy voters.
OPINION
February 8, 2011
An incident in Central California last week was so bizarre that the headlines it generated wouldn't be out of place in a supermarket tabloid next to tales of alien babies and Elvis sightings: "Man Killed by Rooster. " More specifically, one of the feathered contestants in an illegal cockfight in Tulare County, armed with a blade attached to its leg, apparently stabbed 35-year-old Jose Luis Ochoa in the calf, and Ochoa was declared dead of "sharp force injury" two hours later. This isn't the first time someone has died in what is supposed to be blood sport for birds; last summer in Merced, two men got into an argument over a $10 bet, one pulled out a gun and killed the other, and the victim's brother and another man allegedly beat the shooter to death.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The Morning News' annual Tournament of Books has started its engines. On Tuesday, the ToB announced its lineup of contenders to be named the winner -- actually, the Rooster -- for 2014. Initially conceived as "a goof" that took the college basketball tournament model and filled brackets with books, the ToB has proved both long-lasting and inspirational. While it has been followed by dozens of book-bracket imitators that set up all kinds of reading competitions -- children's books, books about Los Angeles -- the race for the Rooster remains central.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1986
Unfortunately, the arrogant attitude of William Huggins toward Central America appears to be identical with that of the Reagan Administration. His admiration of the macho image of the "men that settled the West and made America the banty rooster of young nations" is reprehensible. It is simplistic to equate the U.S. involvement in the war with Germany and Japan with our involvement in attempting by overt and covert means to overthrow a duly elected Nicaraguan administration.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
It wasn't the celluloid ghost of John Wayne that inspired the Coen brothers to go off into the dusty ravines and bleak prairie land of New Mexico to make "True Grit," their 15th feature film and first western. No, this was a project with a storybook beginning. The Coens grew up in a Minneapolis suburb, the children of academics. And in a house full of books, one of the novels that tugged at their imaginations was "True Grit," the quirky but intense 1968 western by Charles Portis.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2010 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
The building that is likely to be the biggest commercial real estate development started in Los Angeles County this year is not part of a movie studio, aerospace venture or other type of business readily associated with the area. It's all about hot sauce. Huy Fong Foods, best known as the maker of Sriracha Hot Chili Sauce with a rooster depicted on the label, broke ground this week on a 655,000-square-foot, $40-million headquarters and factory in Irwindale. The project will nearly triple the space occupied by Huy Fong, which now operates out of two buildings in Rosemead that it will give up when the new facility is finished.
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