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Rooster Cogburn

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Most remakes of classic films are shadows of the originals. But Joel and Ethan Coen's version of the western "True Grit" ? with Jeff Bridges as Rooster Cogburn, newcomer Hailee Steinfeld as the plucky Mattie Ross and Matt Damon as Texas Ranger LaBoeuf ? has won over critics, audiences and even Kim Darby, who played the resolute Mattie in the 1969 original for which John Wayne won his only Oscar as the irascible Cogburn. "It's a wonderful movie," said Darby, now 63. "It's top drawer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2011 | Susan King
Ethan Wayne, the youngest son of Hollywood legend John Wayne, hates to have anything in his pockets because as a young boy he couldn't go out of the house with his dad without a stack of business cards that read, "Good Luck, John Wayne" on one side and the Duke's name typed on the other side stuffed in his pockets. "He would always take care of the fans no matter how busy he got," said Wayne, 49, who is named after his father's character in John Ford's influential 1956 western "The Searchers.
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NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jeff Bridges had to sort through what he calls an "interesting batch of emotions" when the Coen brothers approached him with the idea of playing Rooster Cogburn in "True Grit. " "I said, 'Why do you want to remake that,' you know?" Bridges recalls. "But they were thinking about the book and not the movie, which was a relief for me. I didn't want to be emulating John Wayne. Who would?" He pauses, shakes his head and lets out a laugh. "Who could?" Bridges made the whiskey-soaked marshal enough of his own man to win an Oscar nomination, making Cogburn the 16th film character to earn more than one actor love from academy voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Time
Harry Jackson, an acclaimed Western artist who created the bronze equestrian sculpture of cowboy movie legend John Wayne that was installed in front of what was then the Great Western Savings & Loan office building on Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills in the 1980s, has died. He was 87. Jackson died Monday at the VA Medical Center in Sheridan, Wyo., after dealing with a number of health issues over the last year, said his son Matthew. The Chicago-born artist was considered one of the most promising New York Abstract Expressionist painters in the early 1950s before he turned to realism and became a highly successful Western artist in the tradition of Frederic Remington and Charles Russell.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
It wasn't the celluloid ghost of John Wayne that inspired the Coen brothers to go off into the dusty ravines and bleak prairie land of New Mexico to make "True Grit," their 15th feature film and first western. No, this was a project with a storybook beginning. The Coens grew up in a Minneapolis suburb, the children of academics. And in a house full of books, one of the novels that tugged at their imaginations was "True Grit," the quirky but intense 1968 western by Charles Portis.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
No one is the same after encountering feisty, fearless and plain-spoken Mattie Ross, age 14, from near Dardanelle in Yell County, Ark. Not the other characters in the Charles Portis novel she dominates, and certainly not the filmmaking Coen brothers, Ethan and Joel. The Coens corralled stars Jeff Bridges, Matt Damon, Josh Brolin and Barry Pepper and newcomer Hailee Steinfeld and came away with "True Grit," one of their most broadly entertaining films yet. Mattie has a habit of turning people around, she really does.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2010 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Sometimes you read a book at the wrong time. That was the case for me with Charles Portis' 1968 novel "True Grit" (Tusk/Overlook: 236 pp., $14.95 paper), which I first picked up in the early 1970s, after seeing the film with John Wayne. Back then, I had no idea what Portis was doing; I read the book as if it were in the vein of, say, Sid Fleischman's "By the Great Horn Spoon!," a novel for young readers about the Gold Rush. Both take place in the Old West, and both involve adolescent protagonists, but there the resemblance ends.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Time
Harry Jackson, an acclaimed Western artist who created the bronze equestrian sculpture of cowboy movie legend John Wayne that was installed in front of what was then the Great Western Savings & Loan office building on Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills in the 1980s, has died. He was 87. Jackson died Monday at the VA Medical Center in Sheridan, Wyo., after dealing with a number of health issues over the last year, said his son Matthew. The Chicago-born artist was considered one of the most promising New York Abstract Expressionist painters in the early 1950s before he turned to realism and became a highly successful Western artist in the tradition of Frederic Remington and Charles Russell.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2011 | Susan King
Ethan Wayne, the youngest son of Hollywood legend John Wayne, hates to have anything in his pockets because as a young boy he couldn't go out of the house with his dad without a stack of business cards that read, "Good Luck, John Wayne" on one side and the Duke's name typed on the other side stuffed in his pockets. "He would always take care of the fans no matter how busy he got," said Wayne, 49, who is named after his father's character in John Ford's influential 1956 western "The Searchers.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp
If you want to watch a Coen brothers movie with your kids, the options make for a pretty brief film festival. "Raising Arizona," with its loopy comic energy and nods to the Road Runner, isn't a bad starting point, though you still might have some explaining to do about the whole kidnapping thing. "The Hudsucker Proxy" has that marvelous, wordless sequence in which we see the hula hoop take flight in children's minds. But that's three minutes out of nearly two hours. "O Brother, Where Art Thou?"
NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jeff Bridges had to sort through what he calls an "interesting batch of emotions" when the Coen brothers approached him with the idea of playing Rooster Cogburn in "True Grit. " "I said, 'Why do you want to remake that,' you know?" Bridges recalls. "But they were thinking about the book and not the movie, which was a relief for me. I didn't want to be emulating John Wayne. Who would?" He pauses, shakes his head and lets out a laugh. "Who could?" Bridges made the whiskey-soaked marshal enough of his own man to win an Oscar nomination, making Cogburn the 16th film character to earn more than one actor love from academy voters.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jeff Bridges has a long history of success working with first-timers, including, of course, his Oscar win in 2010 for "Crazy Heart" with first-time director Scott Cooper. But that history didn't make Bridges any less worried when the Coen brothers chose Thousand Oaks youngster Hailee Steinfeld for the lead in "True Grit. " Steinfeld, then 13, had never acted in a movie before, and now here she was, responsible for carrying the film. "I was so concerned about that because, God, it's a tough role," Bridges says of the part of Mattie Ross, the 14-year-old frontier girl determined to track down the man who killed her father.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp
If you want to watch a Coen brothers movie with your kids, the options make for a pretty brief film festival. "Raising Arizona," with its loopy comic energy and nods to the Road Runner, isn't a bad starting point, though you still might have some explaining to do about the whole kidnapping thing. "The Hudsucker Proxy" has that marvelous, wordless sequence in which we see the hula hoop take flight in children's minds. But that's three minutes out of nearly two hours. "O Brother, Where Art Thou?"
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Most remakes of classic films are shadows of the originals. But Joel and Ethan Coen's version of the western "True Grit" ? with Jeff Bridges as Rooster Cogburn, newcomer Hailee Steinfeld as the plucky Mattie Ross and Matt Damon as Texas Ranger LaBoeuf ? has won over critics, audiences and even Kim Darby, who played the resolute Mattie in the 1969 original for which John Wayne won his only Oscar as the irascible Cogburn. "It's a wonderful movie," said Darby, now 63. "It's top drawer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
On a clear New Mexico morning this year, Matt Damon sat and watched the Coen brothers and the crew of "True Grit" as they prepared horses, six-shooters and the camera for the next scene. With more than three dozen feature films under his belt, it could have been just another mundane moment between close-ups, but instead Damon holds on to the snapshot memory with scrapbook affection. "We were halfway through the movie and I was sitting on the set, we were doing this corn dodger scene ?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
No one is the same after encountering feisty, fearless and plain-spoken Mattie Ross, age 14, from near Dardanelle in Yell County, Ark. Not the other characters in the Charles Portis novel she dominates, and certainly not the filmmaking Coen brothers, Ethan and Joel. The Coens corralled stars Jeff Bridges, Matt Damon, Josh Brolin and Barry Pepper and newcomer Hailee Steinfeld and came away with "True Grit," one of their most broadly entertaining films yet. Mattie has a habit of turning people around, she really does.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
On a clear New Mexico morning this year, Matt Damon sat and watched the Coen brothers and the crew of "True Grit" as they prepared horses, six-shooters and the camera for the next scene. With more than three dozen feature films under his belt, it could have been just another mundane moment between close-ups, but instead Damon holds on to the snapshot memory with scrapbook affection. "We were halfway through the movie and I was sitting on the set, we were doing this corn dodger scene ?
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jeff Bridges has a long history of success working with first-timers, including, of course, his Oscar win in 2010 for "Crazy Heart" with first-time director Scott Cooper. But that history didn't make Bridges any less worried when the Coen brothers chose Thousand Oaks youngster Hailee Steinfeld for the lead in "True Grit. " Steinfeld, then 13, had never acted in a movie before, and now here she was, responsible for carrying the film. "I was so concerned about that because, God, it's a tough role," Bridges says of the part of Mattie Ross, the 14-year-old frontier girl determined to track down the man who killed her father.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
On the set of "True Grit," the new Coen brothers western, Hailee Steinfeld established a crafty money-making scheme. Surrounded by a cast and crew of adults, the then 13-year-old created a "swear jar. " Every time someone uttered the f-word, she'd collect $5 from the perpetrator; other bad words were worth a buck. As a trade-off, she had to pay up 50 cents if she said "like. " Her total haul ? $350 ? was impressive. Many teenage girls would head straight to the mall and spend the dough on lip gloss, an iPod or a new wardrobe from Forever 21. Not Steinfeld.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2010 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Sometimes you read a book at the wrong time. That was the case for me with Charles Portis' 1968 novel "True Grit" (Tusk/Overlook: 236 pp., $14.95 paper), which I first picked up in the early 1970s, after seeing the film with John Wayne. Back then, I had no idea what Portis was doing; I read the book as if it were in the vein of, say, Sid Fleischman's "By the Great Horn Spoon!," a novel for young readers about the Gold Rush. Both take place in the Old West, and both involve adolescent protagonists, but there the resemblance ends.
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