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Roots Television Program

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1992
More than 30-plus years ago when I was television editor of the Houston Post and rather full of myself, I wrote a column disparaging Patti Page. After I grew up I regretted doing that and wished I could have apologized. Perhaps Rosenberg will feel the same about Smith when he grows up. DAVID WESTHEIMER Los Angeles
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1997 | Susan King, Susan King is a Times staff writer
LeVar Burton Role: Kunta Kinte MEMORIES: "I was the first one there [on location] in Savannah. Everyone came in after I arrived, and the buzz among the actors was, 'This is material that we do not often see.' These were all veterans in the industry and really venerable actors in my eyes, and they all had a special feeling in their voices when talking about the script. "There's such a thing as the 'Roots' family.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1992 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
Alex Haley's 1977 miniseries, "Roots," not only gave America a lasting emotional experience about black history, it also revolutionized prime-time television storytelling with its book-like novelization of a gigantic story. Haley, who died Monday, knew--like others connected with the 12-hour production--that even the huge success of "Roots" did not open future doors for black performers on TV as much as many hoped it would.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alex Haley told friends he was just a writer trying to make a living. But his death is a poignant reminder that the former Coast Guard cook tapped the hearts of Americans with two monumental books that transcended literature to become cultural icons. "Roots" and "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" inspired millions to trace their family origins, take pride in racial identity and broaden their grasp of history.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1988 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
Fiddler: Freedom, is that something that make a man want to risk his life? Kunta: Fiddler, it's a chance to be who you was born to be. And you don't have to ask no white man or nobody for nothing. --A scene from "Roots: The Gift" They're back. After 11 years, just in time for Christmas, those legendary characters from the landmark miniseries "Roots," based on Alex Haley's multigenerational novel, have returned--not in reruns, but in a new two-hour movie, "Roots: The Gift."
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alex Haley told friends he was just a writer trying to make a living. But his death is a poignant reminder that the former Coast Guard cook tapped the hearts of Americans with two monumental books that transcended literature to become cultural icons. "Roots" and "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" inspired millions to trace their family origins, take pride in racial identity and broaden their grasp of history.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1997 | Susan King, Susan King is a Times staff writer
LeVar Burton Role: Kunta Kinte MEMORIES: "I was the first one there [on location] in Savannah. Everyone came in after I arrived, and the buzz among the actors was, 'This is material that we do not often see.' These were all veterans in the industry and really venerable actors in my eyes, and they all had a special feeling in their voices when talking about the script. "There's such a thing as the 'Roots' family.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
At this certain time, in this certain village, lived this certain person. --Grandma Yaisa, telling a story to enthralled Mandinka children in "Roots," by Alex Haley. Perhaps it was because enormous commercial success came to him relatively late in his life. Perhaps it was because of his upbringing in Henning, Tenn. Whatever the reason, humility was among "Roots" author Alex Haley's greatest assets and most endearing qualities.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
At this certain time, in this certain village, lived this certain person. --Grandma Yaisa, telling a story to enthralled Mandinka children in "Roots," by Alex Haley. Perhaps it was because enormous commercial success came to him relatively late in his life. Perhaps it was because of his upbringing in Henning, Tenn. Whatever the reason, humility was among "Roots" author Alex Haley's greatest assets and most endearing qualities.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1992 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
Alex Haley's 1977 miniseries, "Roots," not only gave America a lasting emotional experience about black history, it also revolutionized prime-time television storytelling with its book-like novelization of a gigantic story. Haley, who died Monday, knew--like others connected with the 12-hour production--that even the huge success of "Roots" did not open future doors for black performers on TV as much as many hoped it would.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1992
More than 30-plus years ago when I was television editor of the Houston Post and rather full of myself, I wrote a column disparaging Patti Page. After I grew up I regretted doing that and wished I could have apologized. Perhaps Rosenberg will feel the same about Smith when he grows up. DAVID WESTHEIMER Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1988 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
Fiddler: Freedom, is that something that make a man want to risk his life? Kunta: Fiddler, it's a chance to be who you was born to be. And you don't have to ask no white man or nobody for nothing. --A scene from "Roots: The Gift" They're back. After 11 years, just in time for Christmas, those legendary characters from the landmark miniseries "Roots," based on Alex Haley's multigenerational novel, have returned--not in reruns, but in a new two-hour movie, "Roots: The Gift."
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