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Roque Dalton

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May 29, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The death of Salvadoran poet Roque Dalton in 1975 is one of the great tragedies of Latin American literature and of the Latin American left. And it was a tragedy the left inflicted on itself. Dalton had joined one of the armed rebel groups fighting against El Salvador's dictatorship. He had, by then, already established an international reputation as a writer. Most of his best writing came during his exile in Cuba, where he wrote seven books of poetry, and “ Miguel Marmol ,” a biography of a 1930s Salvadoran revolutionary that's one of the great, underappreciated masterpieces of Latin American historical writing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The death of Salvadoran poet Roque Dalton in 1975 is one of the great tragedies of Latin American literature and of the Latin American left. And it was a tragedy the left inflicted on itself. Dalton had joined one of the armed rebel groups fighting against El Salvador's dictatorship. He had, by then, already established an international reputation as a writer. Most of his best writing came during his exile in Cuba, where he wrote seven books of poetry, and “ Miguel Marmol ,” a biography of a 1930s Salvadoran revolutionary that's one of the great, underappreciated masterpieces of Latin American historical writing.
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WORLD
May 25, 2010 | By Alex Renderos, Special to the Los Angeles Times
An old killing has come back to haunt the government of President Mauricio Funes, scarcely a year after he took office as El Salvador's first leftist leader. Roque Dalton, the nation's most famous poet, was killed 35 years ago by comrades in the leftist guerrilla movement that fought in the long civil war. Now the slaying has emerged as a thorny problem for Funes just as his government prepared a calendar full of official ceremonies commemorating Dalton, who would have turned 75 this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
The FSG Book of Twentieth-Century Latin American Poetry An Anthology Edited by Ilan Stavans Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 729 pp., $50 Here's the answer to a hypothetical "Jeopardy" query: "Who are Pablo Neruda and, um…?" And now, the question: "Which modern Latin American poets could an average U.S. reader likely name without using Google?" No fair if you're counting Ricky Martin, by the way. Until fairly recently, that would've been my own blushing response. For five years I lived in Mexico City and worked in an office near a beautiful, leafy street named for Rubén Darío, the great Nicaraguan journalist, cultural diplomat and poet.
NEWS
August 9, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are no 'mysteries' in History. Only suppressions, the lies of those who write History. -- from poem titled "Reflection" from "The Banned History of Tom Thumb" by Roque Dalton * As one of this country's best-known poets and an unabashed revolutionary, Roque Dalton escaped many brushes with death. Right-wing Salvadoran dictatorships captured him time and again, but he always got away. It was at the hands of his own leftist guerrilla comrades that Dalton's luck ran out.
BOOKS
December 21, 1986 | Margarite Nieto
FICTION INTERNATIONAL, 16.2: CENTRAL AMERICAN WRITING, edited by Harold Jaffee and Larry McCafferty (San Diego State University: $8, paperback; 224 pp. illustrated).
NEWS
September 6, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two decades after his death, Roque Dalton, one of El Salvador's best-known poets and revolutionaries, is once again calling his countrymen's attention to the violence and poverty that caused a 12-year civil war--and which still exist.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
The FSG Book of Twentieth-Century Latin American Poetry An Anthology Edited by Ilan Stavans Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 729 pp., $50 Here's the answer to a hypothetical "Jeopardy" query: "Who are Pablo Neruda and, um…?" And now, the question: "Which modern Latin American poets could an average U.S. reader likely name without using Google?" No fair if you're counting Ricky Martin, by the way. Until fairly recently, that would've been my own blushing response. For five years I lived in Mexico City and worked in an office near a beautiful, leafy street named for Rubén Darío, the great Nicaraguan journalist, cultural diplomat and poet.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Jack Vance, prolific author of science fiction, mystery and epic fantasy, died Sunday at 96 , his son John told the Associated Press. He had written more than 60 books during his long life. Vance, whose real name was John Holbrook, also published under the names John Holbrook Vance, Alan Wade, Peter Held, John van See and Jay Kavanse, and he wrote three Ellery Queen novels. His best-known series, "The Dying Earth," was set in a future in which the sun is slowly dying out, and a world where technology and the supernatural exist side-by-side.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
If you're planning to hit the beach -- or mountains or woods or backyard patio -- don't forget to bring along a book or two. In our list of 156 summer book picks, you'll find thrillers and young adult books, science books and novels, memoirs and science fiction, books about pop culture and just for kids. There's really something for everyone. A special summer books pull-out tablet -- online here -- appears in the L.A. Times print edition on Sunday. It includes an essay from book critic David L. Ulin, in which he contemplates the luxury of time the summer affords us to read -- a luxury that may be more imaginary than real.
WORLD
May 25, 2010 | By Alex Renderos, Special to the Los Angeles Times
An old killing has come back to haunt the government of President Mauricio Funes, scarcely a year after he took office as El Salvador's first leftist leader. Roque Dalton, the nation's most famous poet, was killed 35 years ago by comrades in the leftist guerrilla movement that fought in the long civil war. Now the slaying has emerged as a thorny problem for Funes just as his government prepared a calendar full of official ceremonies commemorating Dalton, who would have turned 75 this month.
NEWS
September 6, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two decades after his death, Roque Dalton, one of El Salvador's best-known poets and revolutionaries, is once again calling his countrymen's attention to the violence and poverty that caused a 12-year civil war--and which still exist.
NEWS
August 9, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are no 'mysteries' in History. Only suppressions, the lies of those who write History. -- from poem titled "Reflection" from "The Banned History of Tom Thumb" by Roque Dalton * As one of this country's best-known poets and an unabashed revolutionary, Roque Dalton escaped many brushes with death. Right-wing Salvadoran dictatorships captured him time and again, but he always got away. It was at the hands of his own leftist guerrilla comrades that Dalton's luck ran out.
BOOKS
December 21, 1986 | Margarite Nieto
FICTION INTERNATIONAL, 16.2: CENTRAL AMERICAN WRITING, edited by Harold Jaffee and Larry McCafferty (San Diego State University: $8, paperback; 224 pp. illustrated).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2009 | Reed Johnson
Collective memory in El Salvador has long been a fragile commodity. An infamous 1932 government massacre of mainly Indian peasants was officially purged from history books for decades afterward. The country's brutal 12-year civil war of 1980-92 not only claimed tens of thousands of lives and razed entire villages. It also ravaged the country's heritage, fostering widespread amnesia about Salvadoran literature, music, indigenous culture and the performing arts. Over the next week, an ambitious multimedia happening with the umbrella title "Preservación de la Memoria Histórica Salvadoreña" (Salvadoran Preservation of Historic Memory)
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly a decade, guerrilla commander Joaquin Villalobos operated out of a remote mountain base in northeastern El Salvador, earning himself a reputation as the rebels' best and meanest military strategist. He was a communist wolf to the country's right-wing elite and an enigma to the rest of El Salvador. Villalobos let years go by without talking to the press and often refused to leave his post even to meet with his own civilian allies on the left.
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