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Rorschach Test

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By Sharon Mizota
The symmetrical irregularity of a Rorschach test - an inkblot folded over on itself - serves as a scrim on which to project deep-seated biases, assumptions, fears. But what if these murky ciphers leaped off the paper and walked among us? Mexican artist Oscar Cueto explores this outlandish but intriguing scenario in a series of 18 postcard-size watercolors at Walter Maciel Gallery. Based on his own photographs, the paintings look like typical tourist snaps - buildings, oceans, people strolling in the park - except that each one is graced by a Rorschach “creature” or two, looming at the end of a road or flying through the sky like a bat. These figures, with their jagged, organic edges, evoke the increasingly abstract terrors of recent horror movies, yet they sit rather quietly in the landscape, as if just out to take the air. Indeed, it's tempting to read these tiny paintings as metaphors for a psychological airing - our deepest fears, anxieties and secrets bearing down upon us - but the intimate scale of the works and Cueto's light, casual hand belie such a hysterical reading.
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NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Stacey Leasca
Hermann Rorschach is celebrated in Friday's inkblot Google Doodle, inviting users to let their freak flags fly. Two buffaloes, a couple about to kiss, two mustachioed men, and a T-rex doing circus tricks. Those are just some of the things users shared that they could see in the Rorschach test. As Los Angeles Times reporter Deborah Vankin explains, the Rorschach test "is meant to shed light on the personalities and emotional states of its subjects, who the psychoanalyst felt projected their subconscious feelings onto the amorphous blobs of ink when describing their shapes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1997 | SCOTT HARRIS
If readers ever confuse my efforts here for an ink blot, well, I can only hope it was due to a malfunction in the presses and not in my brain. Still, it's remarkable the way certain stories act like a Rorschach test, striking different nerves in different people. Such was the case last Tuesday with a tale that carried the headline "The Day I Looked Crime Straight in the Face."
OPINION
November 28, 2012 | Doyle McManus
In the rest of the country, it may be just another movie, but in Washington, Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" has become a political Rorschach test. It seems as if every pundit in the capital has gone to see the masterful biopic about our 16th president, and - surprise - they all found something to support their views about contemporary politics. The analogies are hard to resist. The movie is set in the first months after Lincoln won a second term, facing an unruly lame-duck Congress.
OPINION
July 30, 1995 | Gaddis Smith, Gaddis Smith is a professor of history at Yale University. His books include "American Diplomacy in the Second World War" (McGraw Hill)
Americans are bitterly divided over the meaning of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki 50 years ago. The sequence of events is beyond dispute: the United States dropped the first bomb on Hiroshima (Aug. 6, 1945); the Soviet Union declared war on Japan (Aug. 8); the United States dropped the second bomb on Nagasaki (Aug. 9); Japan offered to surrender on condition that the imperial throne be preserved (Aug. 10), and the surrender was accepted (Aug. 14).
HEALTH
May 19, 2003 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
The red-and-black splashes on the card are bustling with images: bad-tempered crows, a butterfly in a belly and even a couple of blood-stained kidneys -- if it isn't a pair of monkeys contemplating their rears. You, however, would see other things, for this card and nine others in the world-famous Rorschach test have strange powers and are said to reveal much about a person's mind when a skillful seer interprets them. The cards have another uncanny power: to really, really tick people off.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Stacey Leasca
Hermann Rorschach is celebrated in Friday's inkblot Google Doodle, inviting users to let their freak flags fly. Two buffaloes, a couple about to kiss, two mustachioed men, and a T-rex doing circus tricks. Those are just some of the things users shared that they could see in the Rorschach test. As Los Angeles Times reporter Deborah Vankin explains, the Rorschach test "is meant to shed light on the personalities and emotional states of its subjects, who the psychoanalyst felt projected their subconscious feelings onto the amorphous blobs of ink when describing their shapes.
HEALTH
May 19, 2003 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
Hermann Rorschach was not the first psychiatrist to experiment with inkblots, and the origins of his famous test are not entirely clear. But, according to Rorschach lore, he may have been inspired by a 19th century parlor game called Klecksographie, or Blotto, in which participants made ink blots and then described what they saw. As a Swiss schoolboy, Rorschach was reportedly a fan of the game, even earning the nickname, "Klex."
HEALTH
December 25, 2000 | ROSIE MESTEL
You may be different, but I don't tend to think of orthopedic devices when I think of ancient Egypt. But guess what? German pathologists, writing in the British journal the Lancet, say they've found an Egyptian mummy (dating from 1550-700 BC) of a woman age 50 to 55 who had a prosthetic toe. A nice, realistically carved wooden one, in fact--painted brown and snugly attached to the foot with the help of two small wooden plates and seven leather laces.
HEALTH
May 26, 2003
"Rorschach Tested" (May 19) hypes a few dramatic criticisms and gives short shrift to the considerable scientific support for the Rorschach. A test is evaluated according to how closely its results correlate with the independent criteria it is supposed to measure. Rorschach scores correlate with personality functioning as well as Pap smears detect cervical abnormalities and as well as screening mammograms predict breast cancer within one year. All tests are imperfect, but their results are utilized in context of other information for what they have been shown to contribute.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By Sharon Mizota
The symmetrical irregularity of a Rorschach test - an inkblot folded over on itself - serves as a scrim on which to project deep-seated biases, assumptions, fears. But what if these murky ciphers leaped off the paper and walked among us? Mexican artist Oscar Cueto explores this outlandish but intriguing scenario in a series of 18 postcard-size watercolors at Walter Maciel Gallery. Based on his own photographs, the paintings look like typical tourist snaps - buildings, oceans, people strolling in the park - except that each one is graced by a Rorschach “creature” or two, looming at the end of a road or flying through the sky like a bat. These figures, with their jagged, organic edges, evoke the increasingly abstract terrors of recent horror movies, yet they sit rather quietly in the landscape, as if just out to take the air. Indeed, it's tempting to read these tiny paintings as metaphors for a psychological airing - our deepest fears, anxieties and secrets bearing down upon us - but the intimate scale of the works and Cueto's light, casual hand belie such a hysterical reading.
HEALTH
May 26, 2003
"Rorschach Tested" (May 19) hypes a few dramatic criticisms and gives short shrift to the considerable scientific support for the Rorschach. A test is evaluated according to how closely its results correlate with the independent criteria it is supposed to measure. Rorschach scores correlate with personality functioning as well as Pap smears detect cervical abnormalities and as well as screening mammograms predict breast cancer within one year. All tests are imperfect, but their results are utilized in context of other information for what they have been shown to contribute.
HEALTH
May 19, 2003 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
The red-and-black splashes on the card are bustling with images: bad-tempered crows, a butterfly in a belly and even a couple of blood-stained kidneys -- if it isn't a pair of monkeys contemplating their rears. You, however, would see other things, for this card and nine others in the world-famous Rorschach test have strange powers and are said to reveal much about a person's mind when a skillful seer interprets them. The cards have another uncanny power: to really, really tick people off.
HEALTH
May 19, 2003 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
Hermann Rorschach was not the first psychiatrist to experiment with inkblots, and the origins of his famous test are not entirely clear. But, according to Rorschach lore, he may have been inspired by a 19th century parlor game called Klecksographie, or Blotto, in which participants made ink blots and then described what they saw. As a Swiss schoolboy, Rorschach was reportedly a fan of the game, even earning the nickname, "Klex."
HEALTH
December 25, 2000 | ROSIE MESTEL
You may be different, but I don't tend to think of orthopedic devices when I think of ancient Egypt. But guess what? German pathologists, writing in the British journal the Lancet, say they've found an Egyptian mummy (dating from 1550-700 BC) of a woman age 50 to 55 who had a prosthetic toe. A nice, realistically carved wooden one, in fact--painted brown and snugly attached to the foot with the help of two small wooden plates and seven leather laces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1997 | SCOTT HARRIS
If readers ever confuse my efforts here for an ink blot, well, I can only hope it was due to a malfunction in the presses and not in my brain. Still, it's remarkable the way certain stories act like a Rorschach test, striking different nerves in different people. Such was the case last Tuesday with a tale that carried the headline "The Day I Looked Crime Straight in the Face."
OPINION
December 8, 1991 | Jefferson Morley, Jefferson Morley is a former associate editor of the New Republic and former Washington editor of the Nation
How we make sense of the assassination of John F. Kennedy is directly related to how we make sense of American public life. To explain how the President of the United States came to have his head blown off in broad daylight, we must choose among the millions of available facts.
OPINION
November 28, 2012 | Doyle McManus
In the rest of the country, it may be just another movie, but in Washington, Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" has become a political Rorschach test. It seems as if every pundit in the capital has gone to see the masterful biopic about our 16th president, and - surprise - they all found something to support their views about contemporary politics. The analogies are hard to resist. The movie is set in the first months after Lincoln won a second term, facing an unruly lame-duck Congress.
OPINION
July 30, 1995 | Gaddis Smith, Gaddis Smith is a professor of history at Yale University. His books include "American Diplomacy in the Second World War" (McGraw Hill)
Americans are bitterly divided over the meaning of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki 50 years ago. The sequence of events is beyond dispute: the United States dropped the first bomb on Hiroshima (Aug. 6, 1945); the Soviet Union declared war on Japan (Aug. 8); the United States dropped the second bomb on Nagasaki (Aug. 9); Japan offered to surrender on condition that the imperial throne be preserved (Aug. 10), and the surrender was accepted (Aug. 14).
OPINION
December 8, 1991 | Jefferson Morley, Jefferson Morley is a former associate editor of the New Republic and former Washington editor of the Nation
How we make sense of the assassination of John F. Kennedy is directly related to how we make sense of American public life. To explain how the President of the United States came to have his head blown off in broad daylight, we must choose among the millions of available facts.
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