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March 7, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Kid Gloves," the opening track of Rory Gallagher's new "Fresh Evidence" album, tells of a character who takes on life's struggles with a pugilistic tenacity, declaring, "I'll do anything but die." While the 42-year-old Irish musician drew his inspiration for the song largely from a 1947 John Garfield boxing flick, "Body and Soul," he also admits there's a bit of himself in it. "I wrote it in that kind of mood all right," Gallagher said by phone Monday from a Los Angeles hotel room.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Irish blues-rocker Rory Gallagher may have had his struggles with a fear of flying (his reason for not touring the States in more than six years), but he clearly doesn't have any such apprehensions about soaring on stage. His Peppers Golden Bear show Thursday evening gusted along with all of the legendary Strat basher's customary grit and fury. Some of it was a mite too customary: His show featured more songs from his 1972 "Rory Gallagher, Live!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN
British blues-rocker Rory Gallagher may have had his struggles with a fear of flying (his reason for not touring the States in more than six years), but he clearly doesn't have any such apprehensions about soaring on stage. His show Thursday at Peppers' Golden Bear gusted along with all of the legendary Strat-basher's customary grit and fury. Some of it was a mite too customary, with a show featuring more songs from his 1972 "Rory Gallagher, Live!"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN
British blues-rocker Rory Gallagher may have had his struggles with a fear of flying (his reason for not touring the States in more than six years), but he clearly doesn't have any such apprehensions about soaring on stage. His show Thursday at Peppers' Golden Bear gusted along with all of the legendary Strat-basher's customary grit and fury. Some of it was a mite too customary, with a show featuring more songs from his 1972 "Rory Gallagher, Live!"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Irish blues-rocker Rory Gallagher may have had his struggles with a fear of flying (his reason for not touring the States in more than six years), but he clearly doesn't have any such apprehensions about soaring on stage. His Peppers Golden Bear show Thursday evening gusted along with all of the legendary Strat basher's customary grit and fury. Some of it was a mite too customary: His show featured more songs from his 1972 "Rory Gallagher, Live!"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1990 | STEVE HOCHMAN
More than you need to know about blues-rocker Rory Gallagher and less than you'd like to know about Sinead O'Connor: Though updated from the 1987 "Irish Rock" for American publication, this detailed guide seems out of date and parochial considering the worldwide impact of O'Connor, who only gets a brief mention, though her picture is on the cover. What's more, a deserved dissertation on Van Morrison suffers from Prendergast's labored critical analyses.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
Ireland's Hothouse Flowers tore it up Thursday night at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, making their Orange County debut a memorable one with sizzling, rootsy rock played with the fervor of old-time revivalists. Along the way, the five-man band from Dublin also tore apart and tossed away the stereotype that if a rocker speaks with a brogue, it must necessarily follow that he plays with the musical accent of U2.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
New York rock band Black 47 is coming to Orange County on Monday, but the main point isn't to sell records. "We're coming in there to do Bob Dornan's wake--that's what the theme of this gig is gonna be," said group leader Lance Kirwan. "I only hope he'll show up." Not likely. The notoriously conservative Republican who recently lost his seat in Congress would have little in common with this group's scathing leftist politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In its performance at the Coach House on Wednesday night, Badlands proved to be a damn fine hard-rock band, while at the same time being emblematic of just how moribund our musical culture has become. Deep into the 1-hour, 45-minute set, singer Ray Gillen declared, "We play rock 'n' roll the way we want to--we're no bandwagon band!" That's basically true.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to keep noise from blasting through its ceiling into an upstairs movie theater, Peppers Golden Bear has closed, ending its bid to become a major concert venue for pop, rock and jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Kid Gloves," the opening track of Rory Gallagher's new "Fresh Evidence" album, tells of a character who takes on life's struggles with a pugilistic tenacity, declaring, "I'll do anything but die." While the 42-year-old Irish musician drew his inspiration for the song largely from a 1947 John Garfield boxing flick, "Body and Soul," he also admits there's a bit of himself in it. "I wrote it in that kind of mood all right," Gallagher said by phone Monday from a Los Angeles hotel room.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
Like a blue chip stock, John Anderson has managed to ride out cyclical changes in the country music business--sometimes up, sometimes down--over the past 15 years, but always on the board and paying dividends to fans who have invested in his records and shows. Raised in the central Florida town of Apopka, he took his first musical steps playing rock 'n' roll inspired by the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. But by age 17 he had headed to Nashville, Tenn.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1985 | ROBERT HILBURN
The acidic British rock press doesn't mince words when dealing with its home-grown stars. Melody Maker's Barry McIlheney dismissed fellow countryman Phil Collins' best-selling "No Jacket Required" album as "bland . . . fairly ordinary (music) for very ordinary people to play at their desperately ordinary parties." Duran Duran's "Seven and the Ragged Tiger" was ridiculed in Record Mirror as "so assuredly awful that it breaks new ground in badness."
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