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Rory Stewart

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NEWS
January 29, 2002 | DAVID ZUCCHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For breakfast Sunday morning, Rory Stewart ate four fried eggs and a fistful of naan, the flat Afghan bread. Then he walked to the local bazaar and bought 20 tablets of the antibiotic Cipro, two dog-eared English-language books and a walking stick. Now he was ready to walk across Afghanistan. Stewart, an Oxford-educated Scotsman, set out Sunday afternoon on a 600-mile walk through some of the most inhospitable terrain on Earth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2006 | Teresa Wiltz, Washington Post
There really is no good reason why Rory Stewart did it, except that, well, he wanted to do it: something about adventure and the lure of the land, the thrill of putting one foot in front of the other, leaving a trail of footprints. Walking meditation a la the Sufis, etc., etc. Go forth and ruminate.
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BOOKS
August 6, 2006 | Kit R. Roane, Kit R. Roane, a senior editor at U.S. News & World Report, was one of a handful of un-embedded journalists to make it to Baghdad with advancing coalition forces in 2003.
BUILDING a civil society in postwar Iraq has been a mighty struggle. The infrastructure remains shattered; electricity and clean water are still in short supply. Despite efforts to infuse Iraq with political stability through elections and a constitution, the daily kidnappings, killings and insurgent attacks serve as mortal reminders that chaos reigns. Why isn't Iraq on better footing more than three years after America toppled Saddam Hussein? L.
BOOKS
August 6, 2006 | Kit R. Roane, Kit R. Roane, a senior editor at U.S. News & World Report, was one of a handful of un-embedded journalists to make it to Baghdad with advancing coalition forces in 2003.
BUILDING a civil society in postwar Iraq has been a mighty struggle. The infrastructure remains shattered; electricity and clean water are still in short supply. Despite efforts to infuse Iraq with political stability through elections and a constitution, the daily kidnappings, killings and insurgent attacks serve as mortal reminders that chaos reigns. Why isn't Iraq on better footing more than three years after America toppled Saddam Hussein? L.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2006 | Teresa Wiltz, Washington Post
There really is no good reason why Rory Stewart did it, except that, well, he wanted to do it: something about adventure and the lure of the land, the thrill of putting one foot in front of the other, leaving a trail of footprints. Walking meditation a la the Sufis, etc., etc. Go forth and ruminate.
WORLD
July 23, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
A Protestant extremist shot a 19-year-old Catholic to death as he walked home from a Belfast pub early Monday, after a night of violence that saw two other men wounded in shootings. The Ulster Defense Assn., Northern Ireland's biggest outlawed anti-Catholic group, claimed responsibility for several attacks, including 19-year-old Gerald Lawlor's killing, in a message that threatened further violence.
BOOKS
January 28, 2007
Rankings are based on a Times poll of Southland bookstores. *--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction 1 The Memory Keeper's Daughter by Kim Edwards (Penguin: $14) A father hides the birth of a twin from his wife. 2 The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho (HarperSanFrancisco: $13) An Andalusian shepherd boy searches for treasure in Egypt. 3 The Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai (Grove: $14) A retired judge is caught up in Nepal's independence movement. 4 Snow by Orhan Pamuk (Vintage: $14.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | DAVID ZUCCHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For breakfast Sunday morning, Rory Stewart ate four fried eggs and a fistful of naan, the flat Afghan bread. Then he walked to the local bazaar and bought 20 tablets of the antibiotic Cipro, two dog-eared English-language books and a walking stick. Now he was ready to walk across Afghanistan. Stewart, an Oxford-educated Scotsman, set out Sunday afternoon on a 600-mile walk through some of the most inhospitable terrain on Earth.
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