Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRosa Parks
IN THE NEWS

Rosa Parks

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2002 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James F. Blake, the Montgomery, Ala., bus driver who had Rosa Parks arrested in 1955 when she refused to give up her seat to a white passenger, has died. He was 89. Blake died of a heart attack Thursday at his home in Montgomery. He had been in failing health for some time. The arrest of Parks for violating Montgomery's segregation laws was a galvanizing moment in the civil rights movement. It thrust a young Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 11, 2014 | By Betty DeRamus
Black History Month reminds me of a really great golden oldies station, always blaring the same handful of terrific tunes. Every February, it plays Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks and Harriet Tubman soul - with a chorus or two of the George Washington Carver blues. Now don't get me wrong. This is my kind of history, and my kind of heroes, and I understand why we must tell every generation their stories. I just think that including some fresh tales too would produce a far fuller picture of how blacks enriched America.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By David Ng
President Obama took time out of his schedule Wednesday to help unveil a new statue of civil rights activist Rosa Parks at the Capitol building in Washington. Parks, who died in 2005, is the first black woman to be honored with a life-size likeness in the Capitol's Statuary Hall. The bronze statue, by Robert Firmin and Eugene Daub, depicts Parks seated with her hands on her lap holding a purse. In 1955, Parks refused to move from her seat on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Ala. Her subsequent arrest turned her into a symbol for the civil rights movement.
SPORTS
September 5, 2013 | By Chris Dufresne
Time magazine caught up with the Johnny Manziel story by featuring the Texas A&M quarterback on its cover with another turn-back-the-clock idea: "It's Time to Pay College Athletes. " Wow, what a concept. Time has entered the dangerous area of using Manziel, not a sympathetic figure, to promote an idea that sounds easy but is as complicated as the day is long. The idea that Manziel, a player who comes from a family with money, should be the poster boy for this cause makes a lot of people uncomfortable.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- President Obama paid tribute to civil rights icon Rosa Parks on Wednesday, comparing the Jim Crow-era tolerance of segregation to the acceptance of inequality that persists into the present day. People often live their lives "as if in a fog," Obama said, "accepting injustice, rationalizing inequity, tolerating the intolerable. " "We make excuses for inaction," he said. "We say to ourselves, 'That's not my responsibility. There is nothing I can do.'" Obama spoke at the unveiling of a Parks statue, the first full-length statue of a black woman in the Capitol.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- Rosa Parks made history in 1955 by refusing to move to the back of the bus.  She will make history again next week when her statue is placed in the U.S. Capitol.  It will be the first full-size statue of an African American in the Capitol collection of more than 180 statues, a popular tourist attraction.  There are busts of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Sojourner Truth. A statue of Frederick Douglass is expected to be added soon. "It's another breakthrough for someone who has made so many of them possible," House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio)
OPINION
November 6, 2005
Let's say one last word about Rosa Parks. She is a reminder that in this country, an ordinary citizen can be more important to it than its leaders or celebrities. She is the hallmark of my generation and maybe of 20th century America. God bless. RON COHN Ridgecrest
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
Civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks will not attend tonight's NAACP Image Awards because the event's host, Cedric the Entertainer, made jokes about her in the film "Barbershop" that she considered offensive. In a letter dated Thursday, the co-founder of the Rosa & Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development, Elaine Steele, said they appreciated the invitation from the NAACP. But she said that the jokes in the film represent "a sensitive area to us."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1989 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
As a boy growing up in New Orleans, some of the first words Cyril Neville learned to read were Colored Only and Whites Only. His mother made sure her young sons knew the meaning of those stark reminders of the segregated South so--as he put it--"you wouldn't stumble into death." In 1955, when Cyril was 7, a Montgomery, Ala.
NATIONAL
February 4, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
If you're going to make "forever" stamps, it's hard to go wrong by invoking Rosa Parks' long-lasting legacy. On Monday, the United States Postal Service began to issue their new Parks stamps -- called forever stamps because their rates never change -- to honor the civil-rights figure, who died in 2005. The stamp shows a portrait of Parks painted by Thomas Blackshear II. Monday would have been her 100th birthday. In 1955, in Montgomery, Ala., Parks -- then 42 years old -- refused to give up her seat on a city bus so that a white man could sit down.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By David Ng
President Obama took time out of his schedule Wednesday to help unveil a new statue of civil rights activist Rosa Parks at the Capitol building in Washington. Parks, who died in 2005, is the first black woman to be honored with a life-size likeness in the Capitol's Statuary Hall. The bronze statue, by Robert Firmin and Eugene Daub, depicts Parks seated with her hands on her lap holding a purse. In 1955, Parks refused to move from her seat on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Ala. Her subsequent arrest turned her into a symbol for the civil rights movement.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- President Obama paid tribute to civil rights icon Rosa Parks on Wednesday, comparing the Jim Crow-era tolerance of segregation to the acceptance of inequality that persists into the present day. People often live their lives "as if in a fog," Obama said, "accepting injustice, rationalizing inequity, tolerating the intolerable. " "We make excuses for inaction," he said. "We say to ourselves, 'That's not my responsibility. There is nothing I can do.'" Obama spoke at the unveiling of a Parks statue, the first full-length statue of a black woman in the Capitol.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- Rosa Parks made history in 1955 by refusing to move to the back of the bus.  She will make history again next week when her statue is placed in the U.S. Capitol.  It will be the first full-size statue of an African American in the Capitol collection of more than 180 statues, a popular tourist attraction.  There are busts of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Sojourner Truth. A statue of Frederick Douglass is expected to be added soon. "It's another breakthrough for someone who has made so many of them possible," House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio)
NATIONAL
February 4, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
If you're going to make "forever" stamps, it's hard to go wrong by invoking Rosa Parks' long-lasting legacy. On Monday, the United States Postal Service began to issue their new Parks stamps -- called forever stamps because their rates never change -- to honor the civil-rights figure, who died in 2005. The stamp shows a portrait of Parks painted by Thomas Blackshear II. Monday would have been her 100th birthday. In 1955, in Montgomery, Ala., Parks -- then 42 years old -- refused to give up her seat on a city bus so that a white man could sit down.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Was that janitor wearing a hood? Because nothing says "white supremacy" like picking up litter, a Ku Klux Klan group in Georgia has applied to adopt a one-mile stretch of highway through the Appalachian Mountains. That creates a quandary for that state's Department of Transportation, which is reportedly meeting with officials from the attorney general's office to decide what to do. Past experience suggests only one outcome: The Klan will get to adopt its highway. Rancor and vandalism will infect that stretch of road like the stink from a flattened skunk, and the International Keystone Knights (that's Knights, not Kops)
OPINION
October 24, 2011 | By Sam Wineburg
"Students' Knowledge of Civil Rights History Has Deteriorated," one headline announced. "Civil Rights Movement Education 'Dismal' in American Schools," declared another. The alarming headlines, which appeared in newspapers across the country, grew out of a report released three weeks ago by the Southern Poverty Law Center, "Teaching the Movement," which claims that the civil rights movement is widely ignored in history classrooms. By not teaching it, the report claims, American education is "failing in its responsibility to educate its citizens to be agents of change.
NEWS
April 22, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Lawmakers voted to give civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks, 86, a Congressional Gold Medal, its highest civilian award, for an act of defiance more than 40 years ago. Often hailed as the "first lady" or "mother" of the civil rights movement, Parks refused in Montgomery, Ala., to give up her seat to a white man on a segregated city bus. Her arrest set off a lengthy bus boycott by blacks that lasted until the Supreme Court declared Montgomery's bus segregation law unconstitutional and it was changed.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | From Associated Press
Rosa Parks, whose refusal to move to the back of the bus 35 years ago was a key moment in the civil rights struggle, was honored Thursday by House Democratic leaders, who said she had changed the nation. "Rosa, let me thank you personally for sitting down so long ago so I could stand here today," said Rep. William H. Gray III (D-Pa.), the House Democratic whip, who credited Parks with triggering changes that have allowed blacks such as himself to attain high office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2011 | Associated Press
Manning Marable, an influential historian whose forthcoming biography of Malcolm X could revise perceptions of the slain civil rights leader, has died only days before the book described as his life's work was to be published. He was 60. Marable died Friday of complications of pneumonia at New York-Presbyterian Hospital in Manhattan, said his wife, Leith Mullings. She said Marable had suffered for 24 years from sarcoidosis, a disease characterized by inflammation in the lungs or other tissue, and had undergone a double lung transplant in July.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2010 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
United States history is filled with such heroes as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Rosa Parks and Bank of America. Well, maybe not, but the colossal bank is doing its best to join the pantheon. After being excoriated for its role in the financial crisis and government bailout, BofA has been looking for ways to show its influence on the U.S. economy in a positive light. The History channel's uplifting "America: The Story of Us," an ambitious 12-part series that recounts 400 years of U.S. history, offered the opportunity.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|