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Rosalia Arteaga

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NEWS
February 10, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Rosalia Arteaga became interim president of Ecuador under a compromise reached Sunday to end a political crisis that saw three people claiming the right to lead this Andean nation. Under a formula worked out with Congress and the military, Arteaga will lead the nation for about a week while constitutional reforms are passed to clarify presidential succession. Her successor will serve until new presidential elections are held and the winner begins a four-year term Aug. 10, 1998.
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NEWS
February 10, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Rosalia Arteaga became interim president of Ecuador under a compromise reached Sunday to end a political crisis that saw three people claiming the right to lead this Andean nation. Under a formula worked out with Congress and the military, Arteaga will lead the nation for about a week while constitutional reforms are passed to clarify presidential succession. Her successor will serve until new presidential elections are held and the winner begins a four-year term Aug. 10, 1998.
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NEWS
February 12, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Congress selected its own leader, Fabian Alarcon, as interim president in a move aimed at ending a weeklong political crisis. Alarcon, who received the presidential sash in a swearing-in ceremony, is to call elections within 12 months and govern until August 1998. Flamboyant former President Abdala Bucaram, who calls himself El Loco, or "the crazy one," was sacked Thursday by Congress for "mental instability."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1997
In the pre-Lenten Carnival season, life turns upside down for three frantic days. In Ecuador, it takes longer. Some may argue that in Ecuador the madness began last July 7, the day that Abdala Bucaram, better known as "El Loco," was elected president. That political carnival continues, and an even larger crisis--economic disaster--looms unresolved on the horizon. At one time last week, there were three people simultaneously claiming to be Ecuador's president.
NEWS
February 8, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
At least one person was killed in violence that erupted late Friday between protesters and police guarding Ecuador's presidential palace, authorities said. The unrest came as this small Andean nation found itself with three presidents--the one Ecuadoreans elected, the one Congress named when it dismissed him and the country's vice president, who claims the position is hers.
NEWS
February 9, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Struggling to stay in power, elected President Abdala Bucaram on Saturday called for supporters to launch a general strike unless two rivals for the presidency join him in talks Wednesday to resolve this nation's constitutional crisis. Dripping wet from rain and in shirt sleeves, Bucaram entered the state government building in the port of Guayaquil and proclaimed, "I am going to defend the constitution."
NEWS
February 9, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political crisis that gave Ecuador three competing presidents appeared to be nearing an end early today as the vice president, Congress and armed forces reached an agreement for a peaceful transition of power. Details of the agreement were not immediately available. But the consensus appeared to end elected President Abdala Bucaram's bid to stay in power.
NEWS
February 8, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Abdala Bucaram maintained a tenuous hold on power here Friday night, daring his opponents to challenge his authority after protests in the capital left one youth dead. Although three people claimed to be president of this country, no one was clearly in charge. Police used tear gas to turn back demonstrators who marched from Congress toward the presidential palace on Friday afternoon to demand that Bucaram, the president Ecuadoreans elected last year, step down.
NEWS
January 31, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cindy Espinoza took to the gutted, gravelly streets of this barrio last year to campaign for president. Knocking on the doors of cinder-block shanties and wielding a bullhorn to be heard by voters behind barred windows and doors, she pledged to work for better schools, new community services, paved roads and more parks in the crime-infested slum.
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