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Rosalie Sorrels

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even a traveling lady has to slow down eventually. Deceleration is almost at hand for Rosalie Sorrels, the highway-rambling folk singer whose many autobiographical songs and stories include a proud theme called "Traveling Lady." At age 63, Sorrels spent the first half of this year charging down the road as vigorously as ever, touring all over the country in her usual way. She says she logged 20,000 miles at the wheel in one four-month stretch crisscrossing the western United States.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even a traveling lady has to slow down eventually. Deceleration is almost at hand for Rosalie Sorrels, the highway-rambling folk singer whose many autobiographical songs and stories include a proud theme called "Traveling Lady." At age 63, Sorrels spent the first half of this year charging down the road as vigorously as ever, touring all over the country in her usual way. She says she logged 20,000 miles at the wheel in one four-month stretch crisscrossing the western United States.
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NEWS
February 10, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM
If you want a quick, Valentine's-card answer to the question that Sorrels, one of the great figures of American folk music, poses in this album's title, you should turn elsewhere. It takes her more than an hour to explore her theme, but, as she says at one point, quoting Colette on child-raising, "It is important not to be in a hurry." Sorrels comes at love from surprising, often oblique angles as she strings together the varied pearls of her distinctive performing style.
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
If Dan Quayle thinks he is presidential timber, maybe he should stop tilting at fictitious windmills like Murphy Brown and take on somebody who actually is somebody, and a pretty formidable somebody at that.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
Rosalie Sorrels has led the kind of life that lends itself to being mythologized, perhaps because some of the fundamental currents and contradictions in American life have been played out so vividly in her own. At 58, the woman from Idaho has been a presence on the folk music scene for nearly 30 years, singing songs, telling tales and releasing 17 albums. Hers is a story of freewheeling mobility, but also of a desire to be firmly rooted.
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
If Dan Quayle thinks he is presidential timber, maybe he should stop tilting at fictitious windmills like Murphy Brown and take on somebody who actually is somebody, and a pretty formidable somebody at that.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1994
John Roos' pop music review of Irish harpist Kim Robertson's concert at Shade Tree ("World Tour--With String Attached," March 2) is a critique that's done just right. Though I missed the concert (and too many others because travel is difficult), I did not miss it altogether: Roos' description was like an "out of body experience" (see Jim Washburn's story about "journeys into consciousness" in that same day's View section). While reading Roos' review, I could almost feel that I was there at the concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Between songs, Rosalie Sorrels would lean forward over her guitar, her left elbow resting on its neck, her hands folded atop the strings, looking for all the world like a neighbor holding forth across a back-yard fence. As her long, warmly engaging performance Saturday night at the Anaheim Cultural Arts Center progressed, it became clear that she is the sort of neighbor everyone would like to have.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The strongest testimony to Rosalie Sorrels' power to touch people came during intermission of her concert Saturday night at Ball Junior High School. On the patio outside the auditorium, you could overhear a softly weeping middle-age man softly telling his companions about the pain of his "fractured relationship" with his daughter, feelings sparked by Sorrels' songs and readings about families struggling to find a mutual understanding.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1998 | JERRY CROWE
* Kinks leader Ray Davies, right, will be at the Veterans Wadsworth Theater on April 30 for a night of music and reminiscences. Tickets go on sale Sunday. . . . Tickets will be available Sunday for "Stormy Weather '98," a benefit concert starring Stevie Nicks, Sheryl Crow, Gwen Stefani, Paula Cole and Trisha Yearwood, among others, April 16 at the Wiltern Theatre. . . . Michael Crawford will be at the Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre on May 29 and the Hollywood Bowl on May 30.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1994
John Roos' pop music review of Irish harpist Kim Robertson's concert at Shade Tree ("World Tour--With String Attached," March 2) is a critique that's done just right. Though I missed the concert (and too many others because travel is difficult), I did not miss it altogether: Roos' description was like an "out of body experience" (see Jim Washburn's story about "journeys into consciousness" in that same day's View section). While reading Roos' review, I could almost feel that I was there at the concert.
NEWS
February 10, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM
If you want a quick, Valentine's-card answer to the question that Sorrels, one of the great figures of American folk music, poses in this album's title, you should turn elsewhere. It takes her more than an hour to explore her theme, but, as she says at one point, quoting Colette on child-raising, "It is important not to be in a hurry." Sorrels comes at love from surprising, often oblique angles as she strings together the varied pearls of her distinctive performing style.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The strongest testimony to Rosalie Sorrels' power to touch people came during intermission of her concert Saturday night at Ball Junior High School. On the patio outside the auditorium, you could overhear a softly weeping middle-age man softly telling his companions about the pain of his "fractured relationship" with his daughter, feelings sparked by Sorrels' songs and readings about families struggling to find a mutual understanding.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Between songs, Rosalie Sorrels would lean forward over her guitar, her left elbow resting on its neck, her hands folded atop the strings, looking for all the world like a neighbor holding forth across a back-yard fence. As her long, warmly engaging performance Saturday night at the Anaheim Cultural Arts Center progressed, it became clear that she is the sort of neighbor everyone would like to have.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
Rosalie Sorrels has led the kind of life that lends itself to being mythologized, perhaps because some of the fundamental currents and contradictions in American life have been played out so vividly in her own. At 58, the woman from Idaho has been a presence on the folk music scene for nearly 30 years, singing songs, telling tales and releasing 17 albums. Hers is a story of freewheeling mobility, but also of a desire to be firmly rooted.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
Folk music venues are hard to come by, and Orange County may have lost one of its most vital with the closing of the Anaheim Cultural Arts Center. The Occasional String Band held twice-monthly events at the center, a traditional "Old Time Dance Party" on the third Saturday of each month and a "Living Tradition" series of folk concerts featuring such performers as Rosalie Sorrels on the second Saturday. The group continues to sponsor a monthly Cajun dance party in Culver City.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2001
8pm Pop Music Rosalie Sorrels has been a fixture in the folk-music revival since the early '60s, but with her latest album she turns the focus on another folk matriarch. "No Closing Chord: The Songs of Malvina Reynolds," includes such staples of the activist repertoire as the satirical "Little Boxes" and the chilling "What Have They Done to the Rain," and features guest appearances by Terry Garthwaite and Bonnie Raitt. * Rosalie Sorrels, Dabney Hall Lounge, Caltech, Pasadena, 8 p.m. $15.
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