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Rosalina Tuyuc

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NEWS
January 18, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosalina Tuyuc was a young mother of two when her husband left for work one day and never returned. The family had fled their rural homeland and moved to the capital in search of safety. But in Guatemala in the 1980s, there wasn't much safety for Mayan Indians, regarded by the army as pro-communist guerrilla sympathizers and decimated in military scorched-earth campaigns that wiped out entire villages. For Tuyuc, the destruction around her became a call to action.
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NEWS
April 2, 1994 | EDWARD ORLEBAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A wave of hysteria fueled by rumors of child-snatching foreigners has victimized three Americans, triggered rioting in Guatemalan villages and threatens to provoke a backlash by government security forces. An American woman was beaten nearly to death Tuesday in a remote Indian village and remained in a coma Friday.
OPINION
January 5, 1997 | Victor Perera, Victor Perera is author of "Unfinished Conquest: The Guatemalan Tragedy" and "The Cross and the Pear Tree: A Sephardic Journey" (California)
The guerrilla commanders' arrival in war-torn Guatemala from Mexico two weeks ago to sign "a firm and lasting peace" abounded in mixed metaphors as much as in official ceremony. The graying comandantes were greeted in Guatemala City's airport by marimba music and armed escorts supplied by the military who had defeated them. The musicians belonged to indigenous Maya communities decimated by the 36-year-long conflict.
OPINION
February 6, 1994 | Victor Perera, Victor Perera, who teaches at the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley, is the author of "Unfinished Conquest: The Guatemalan Tragedy" and "Rites: A Guatemalan Boyhood," due out in paperback from Mercury House next fall
A new, indigenous opposition is emerging in Guatemala that could determine the fate of President Ramiro de Leon Carpio's anti-corrup tion constitutional reforms, ap proved last Sunday in a referendum that attracted fewer than 20% of the country's eligible voters.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | William R. Long, This article was reported by Times staff writers Juanita Darling in Mexico, Tracy Wilkinson in Guatemala and William R. Long in Peru and by special correspondent Stan Yarbro in Colombia. It was written by Long
Tupac Amaru, fed up with the oppressive treatment of Peruvian Indians in the 18th Century, headed a bloody native rebellion against the Spanish colonial Establishment until he was captured and brutally executed. The Spanish crushed the revolt but ended up granting a few of the reforms that Tupac Amaru had demanded. The struggle for Indian rights in Latin America, it seems, has never been easy. But the struggle goes on.
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