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Rosalind Elias

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1992 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It may be trendy in some circles, but Rosalind Elias, opera singer-turned-director, is not about to update Bizet's "Carmen." "I'm not so bored yet with directing that I want to put Carmen on roller skates, or put Micaela in toe shoes, which has been done before. I won't do anything for shock value, and if they say I'm just a traditionalist, I say fine. I leave it to somebody else to have some singer masturbate while singing an aria."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1992 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It may be trendy in some circles, but Rosalind Elias, opera singer-turned-director, is not about to update Bizet's "Carmen." "I'm not so bored yet with directing that I want to put Carmen on roller skates, or put Micaela in toe shoes, which has been done before. I won't do anything for shock value, and if they say I'm just a traditionalist, I say fine. I leave it to somebody else to have some singer masturbate while singing an aria."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
As a singer at the Metropolitan Opera in New York for nearly 30 years, mezzo-soprano Rosalind Elias was always itching to tell the stage director what to do. "I would think, 'Ah, gee, I wish he would do this and I wish he would do that,' " Elias said recently. "Of course, sometimes I would speak up, but usually you have to leave it to their creativity." Since 1983, however, Elias has been doing what she long wants.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
As a singer at the Metropolitan Opera in New York for nearly 30 years, mezzo-soprano Rosalind Elias was always itching to tell the stage director what to do. "I would think, 'Ah, gee, I wish he would do this and I wish he would do that,' " Elias said recently. "Of course, sometimes I would speak up, but usually you have to leave it to their creativity." Since 1983, however, Elias has been doing what she long wants.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
While L.A. Music Center Opera unveiled its new co-production of Rossini's "Tancredi," Opera Pacific in not-far-away Costa Mesa trotted out the well-worn, well-used and, to some, beloved old Alfred Siercke production of the composer's "Il Barbiere di Siviglia"--mounted first in post-World War II Hamburg and, after its arrival in San Francisco in the early 1960s, familiar all over this continent. Just two Februaries ago, for instance, it returned to San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER
Opera Pacific added a bright new cast to its hand-me-down production of "Il Barbiere di Siviglia" on Sunday afternoon at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. Alfred Siercke's clever set was, of course, familiar. The celebrated three-tier doll house, originally designed for the exigencies of a shallow stage in post-War Hamburg, has been a San Francisco staple since 1963. San Diego got to see it in 1987, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In his announcement Wednesday of San Diego Opera's next two seasons--1992 and 1993--general director Ian Campbell kept one promise and broke another. As anticipated, in 1992 the local company will expand the number of Civic Theatre performances from four to five of each of the five opera productions. But in 1993, 20th-Century opera will disappear from the local lineup.
NEWS
January 15, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Richard Strauss' sumptuous "Der Rosenkavalier" and his unconventional "Ariadne auf Naxos" will be among four new productions during Los Angeles Opera's 2004-05 season, along with Samuel Barber's "Vanessa" and Charles Gounod's "Romeo and Juliet." The company announced Wednesday that the season will begin Sept. 8 with Mozart's early opera "Idomeneo," featuring company general director Placido Domingo, Anna Netrebko and Angelika Kirschlager.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1987 | HERBERT GLASS
Fritz Reiner (1888-1963), the Hungarian-born conductor who raised the Chicago Symphony to the heights during the last decade of his life with a method compounded equally of skill and intimidation, ranked with Arturo Toscanini and George Szell among the legendary tyrants of the podium. There is ample documentation of his blazing temper, his tiny beat (which, he claimed, forced the players to concentrate)--and his acutely sensitive ear for pitch and balance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2002 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Opera closes its 2001-02 season with a rarity of a double bill: two acknowledged masterpieces from the 20th century, Bela Bartok's "Duke Bluebeard's Castle" and Puccini's "Gianni Schicchi." Bartok's single opera and Puccini's single comedy, both first produced in 1918, are different stage animals but are complementary. The former is mysterious, allusive, symbolic and ambiguous; the latter, accessible, beautifully crafted and easy to love.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1992 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar.
Sony seems determined to inundate the planet with mid-priced releases of the bulk of its Leonard Bernstein recordings from the late 1950s through late '70s via the massive "Royal Edition," so called for its utilization, in a coincidental marvel of mistiming, of paintings by HRH the Prince of Wales (i.e., Charles) as cover art. Living with the series to its present midpoint has at times proven frustrating for its frequent lack of selectivity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1992 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Another "Carmen." Another Carmen. Gypsy pipsies come and go in Bizet's ever-popular hum-along opera. They usually come with hand on hip and rose in teeth. Some are tempestuous, some are seductive. A few are both and many--alas--are neither. Adria Firestone, the little-known American mezzo-soprano who womanned the castanets and the exotic bodice language for the San Diego Opera on Saturday, is both.
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