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Rosalind Stewart

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles city official in charge of helping build a network of neighborhood councils resigned Thursday, dogged by criticism that she was not effectively helping communities organize. Rosalind Stewart, head of the Department of Neighborhood Empowerment, submitted her resignation Thursday, and told Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn she would remain in her position until Aug. 31. Her resignation letter did not indicate why she was leaving.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles city official in charge of helping build a network of neighborhood councils resigned Thursday, dogged by criticism that she was not effectively helping communities organize. Rosalind Stewart, head of the Department of Neighborhood Empowerment, submitted her resignation Thursday, and told Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn she would remain in her position until Aug. 31. Her resignation letter did not indicate why she was leaving.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1999 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Richard Riordan has selected an experienced community organizer and a respected congressional aide to head the city's new Department of Neighborhood Empowerment, the mayor announced Wednesday, fulfilling an important step toward implementation of the City Charter that voters overwhelmingly approved earlier this year.
OPINION
February 13, 2000 | MOLLY SELVIN, Molly Selvin is an editorial writer for The Times
After a decade of mediating nasty neighborhood squabbles, Rosalind Stewart would have been forgiven if she vowed never to attend another community meeting. Instead, Stewart, 50, has signed on for a future of community meetings without end. Last September, Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan named the former field deputy to Councilmembers Marvin Braude and Cindy Miscikowski as general manager of the city's new Department of Neighborhood Empowerment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1999 | SUE FOX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Councilwoman Cindy Miscikowski remembers the day a few months ago that her office received a call from a disgruntled constituent. The man called often, and almost always to complain. "I call him the grumbler," Miscikowski said. "It's the kind of call many people would cringe at and just give lip service to." But this time the woman on the receiving end was Rosalind Stewart, Miscikowski's deputy for special projects.
OPINION
February 13, 2000 | MOLLY SELVIN, Molly Selvin is an editorial writer for The Times
After a decade of mediating nasty neighborhood squabbles, Rosalind Stewart would have been forgiven if she vowed never to attend another community meeting. Instead, Stewart, 50, has signed on for a future of community meetings without end. Last September, Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan named the former field deputy to Councilmembers Marvin Braude and Cindy Miscikowski as general manager of the city's new Department of Neighborhood Empowerment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1999 | AGNES DIGGS
The City Council on Wednesday gave the go-ahead to permits for three new San Fernando Valley construction projects. The council approved a measure exempting the Marvin Braude Constituent Service Center--planned for Van Nuys Boulevard and Sylvan Street--from a 15-foot building-line setback requirement in effect since the 1950s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO and (B1), The Van Nuys Homeless Outreach Team received grants to expand its services Valleywide. At left, mother and sons walk to a shelter. Valley Roundup, B3.
A pilot project that moved intoxicated and addicted homeless people off downtown Van Nuys streets and into assistance programs has received two grants to continue operations in the Valley. The Homeless Outreach Team (HOT), which operates near the civic center, will receive one federal grant of $30,000 through the city's Targeted Neighborhood Initiative. That money will continue the program in Van Nuys for six more months, said John Horn, the L.A. Family Housing Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
Tarzana became the first community in the Valley to establish a business improvement district along Ventura Boulevard. In a 12-0 vote, the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday approved a property-based business improvement district for Tarzana for a half-mile between Reseda and Burbank boulevards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2001
Drafters of Los Angeles' 2-year-old city charter envisioned a network of neighborhood councils as one answer to the city's rootlessness and anonymity. The idea was that these councils would draw together residents, business owners and religious and school leaders--not just homeowners--to solve common problems and implement a common vision, from getting street trash picked up to having a say in new developments. Last week, Mayor James K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1999 | SUE FOX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Councilwoman Cindy Miscikowski remembers the day a few months ago that her office received a call from a disgruntled constituent. The man called often, and almost always to complain. "I call him the grumbler," Miscikowski said. "It's the kind of call many people would cringe at and just give lip service to." But this time the woman on the receiving end was Rosalind Stewart, Miscikowski's deputy for special projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1999 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Richard Riordan has selected an experienced community organizer and a respected congressional aide to head the city's new Department of Neighborhood Empowerment, the mayor announced Wednesday, fulfilling an important step toward implementation of the City Charter that voters overwhelmingly approved earlier this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Officials have called it nothing less than a revolution in urban governance--a system of charter-mandated neighborhood councils that will give ordinary residents political clout, unite disparate communities and usher in a new age of democracy. On Saturday, though, a group of Angelenos seemed most interested in knowing whether the city's soon-to-be-adopted system of neighborhood councils would fix potholes and shattered sidewalks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a 50% jump in costs, the city's top two administrators are prepared to recommend that Los Angeles go ahead with construction of a new civic center building in Van Nuys to provide centralized services for the San Fernando Valley, officials said Monday. A report by Chief Legislative Analyst Ron Deaton and Acting City Administrative Officer Paul Cauley was being finalized Monday for release as early as today so it can be acted on next month by the City Council, officials said.
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