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Rosalind Wiener Wyman

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BUSINESS
July 13, 1988 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Some things are worth fighting for. Front-row box seats behind the Dodger dugout at Dodger Stadium, for instance. And so Rosalind Wiener Wyman, a former Los Angeles City Council member and well-connected Democratic party activist, Tuesday sued her late husband's law firm, claiming that it has breached an agreement that would let her buy the box seat tickets she had used until his death in 1973.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-six-year-old Alex Padilla isn't even close to being the youngest person elected to the Los Angeles City Council. That record is still held by Rosalind Wyman, who was elected in 1953 at 22, fresh out of college. "He's an old-timer at 26," joked Wyman, a Bel-Air resident who is now a member of the Democratic National Committee and was on the panel that picked Los Angeles to host the party's 2000 presidential convention.
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NEWS
December 21, 1989 | BETTIJANE LEVINE
When Rosalind Wyman, 59, a community activist and former member of the Los Angeles City Council, looks to the future, "two things come to mind that worry me. One is the American educational system. "I think we are falling down terribly, and I have great concern about the future of the people who have to run this world," says Wyman, who has racked up an impressive list of firsts in politics and public service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even at 26, Alex Padilla isn't even close to being the youngest person elected to the Los Angeles City Council. That record is still held by Rosalind Wyman, who was elected in 1953 when she was just 22 and right out of college. "He's an old-timer at 26," joked Wyman, a Bel-Air resident who is now a member of the Democratic National Committee and was on the committee that picked Los Angeles to host the party's 2000 convention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-six-year-old Alex Padilla isn't even close to being the youngest person elected to the Los Angeles City Council. That record is still held by Rosalind Wyman, who was elected in 1953 at 22, fresh out of college. "He's an old-timer at 26," joked Wyman, a Bel-Air resident who is now a member of the Democratic National Committee and was on the panel that picked Los Angeles to host the party's 2000 presidential convention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even at 26, Alex Padilla isn't even close to being the youngest person elected to the Los Angeles City Council. That record is still held by Rosalind Wyman, who was elected in 1953 when she was just 22 and right out of college. "He's an old-timer at 26," joked Wyman, a Bel-Air resident who is now a member of the Democratic National Committee and was on the committee that picked Los Angeles to host the party's 2000 convention.
MAGAZINE
August 13, 2000 | DAVE LESHER, Dave Lesher is an Assistant Political Editor on the National Desk
I'm trying to get Roz Wyman to crack, to join the rest of us in our rant about a political system that has run amok. * What about the Buddhist temple? I ask. And soft money and impeachment and independent counsels and PACs and the Lincoln Bedroom? I could keep going, but this isn't making a dent. * What about Social Security, she counters. And what about Medicare? What about my senator--Dianne Feinstein? "Do you want a hero?
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | BETTIJANE LEVINE
When Rosalind Wyman, 59, a community activist and former member of the Los Angeles City Council, looks to the future, "two things come to mind that worry me. One is the American educational system. "I think we are falling down terribly, and I have great concern about the future of the people who have to run this world," says Wyman, who has racked up an impressive list of firsts in politics and public service.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1988 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Some things are worth fighting for. Front-row box seats behind the Dodger dugout at Dodger Stadium, for instance. And so Rosalind Wiener Wyman, a former Los Angeles City Council member and well-connected Democratic party activist, Tuesday sued her late husband's law firm, claiming that it has breached an agreement that would let her buy the box seat tickets she had used until his death in 1973.
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