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Rosalyn Sterling Scott

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1995 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of a devastating government report about medical care at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center, Los Angeles County Supervisor Yvonne Brathwaite Burke on Friday called for the county to hire an independent evaluation of the inner-city hospital's medical procedures.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2003 | Charles Ornstein and Tracy Weber, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles County officials vowed Monday to try starting a new surgical training program from scratch at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center, less than one week after learning that the accreditation of the hospital's existing program had been revoked. "We're committed to going back and submitting a new program" for approval, said Dr. Thomas Garthwaite, director of the county Department of Health Services.
NEWS
July 21, 1995 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO and VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an unprecedented condemnation of medical care at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center, a government investigation has concluded that the death of a police officer who was shot in the line of duty three years ago resulted from "gross negligence" in his postoperative care at the county-run hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1993 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sound of taps has long faded from the cemetery where Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Nelson Yamamoto was buried last year after undergoing surgery for gunshot wounds. But the case is far from closed. For 18 months, a high-stakes criminal investigation has quietly focused on whether Yamamoto's death was caused by the gross negligence of doctors at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center.
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was on her way up, the first black woman in the country certified as a thoracic surgeon, hellbent on becoming a chief of surgery, then, someday, a medical school dean. Dr. Rosalyn Sterling Scott was no stranger to high-profile cases: She'd operated on a senator who'd been shot, a SWAT team member who'd accidentally shot himself, a little girl gunned down in a schoolyard. But the case of Sheriff's Deputy Nelson Yamamoto nearly decimated her dreams.
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