Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRosamund Felsen
IN THE NEWS

Rosamund Felsen

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1993 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is chair, department of liberal arts and sciences, Otis School of Art and Design. and
Los Angeles artists, collectors and dealers meet September with a sense of anticipation. In L.A., the evening air turns slightly cooler, the populace regains a sense of urgency and by mid-month, there are smart turnouts at museum and gallery receptions. The season has begun. Many of the artists, at least, can talk about their summer shows in Europe at the Venice Biennale, the Basel art fair, the Vienna art museum.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
Jean Lowe is not an illusionist in the conventional sense of the term. Her painted images and papier-mache sculptures don't typically fool the eye by closely resembling the things they represent. Her game has more to do with the machinations of the mind, the conflations and confusions between what we know, want and believe. Maybe a better term for her would be delusionist, for she stabs satirically at broad-scale practices of deception, as well as personal patterns of self-deception.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1991 | SUVAN GEER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is something totally appealing about Marc Pally's large lyric abstractions. He can turn organic shapes into beguiling games of randomly meshing imagery by deftly shuffling his 15 panel canvases around the wall like two-dimensional Rubik's cubes. But Pally apparently longs for his paintings to do more than lilt, he wants them to challenge--at least intellectually.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By David Pagel
By the time Monet got around to painting pictures of haystacks, viewers pretty much knew that his works were not about farming. All kinds of subjects, including perception, time, workmanship and mortality, as well as paint's capacity to make and convey meaning, played into the Impressionist's images of life in the French countryside. Times have changed - and not for the better. Today it seems that people look at pictures and see little more than what they depict, without bothering to pay attention to the hows or whys of the process.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
A dozen new table-top sculptures by Patrick Nickell represent a significant evolution, which the artist also signals by titling his beguiling exhibition “Letting Go.” Serendipity has always been a prominent feature of his meandering abstractions, but now it has brought him to an implied - and sometimes even frank - figuration. Nickell's last show at Rosamund Felsen Gallery two years ago, which featured some of the mid-career artist's finest work, featured looping interlaces of painted plaster over a metal armature, painted and set on top of simple, homemade white tables that function as homey pedestals.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
Jean Lowe is not an illusionist in the conventional sense of the term. Her painted images and papier-mache sculptures don't typically fool the eye by closely resembling the things they represent. Her game has more to do with the machinations of the mind, the conflations and confusions between what we know, want and believe. Maybe a better term for her would be delusionist, for she stabs satirically at broad-scale practices of deception, as well as personal patterns of self-deception.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By David Pagel
By the time Monet got around to painting pictures of haystacks, viewers pretty much knew that his works were not about farming. All kinds of subjects, including perception, time, workmanship and mortality, as well as paint's capacity to make and convey meaning, played into the Impressionist's images of life in the French countryside. Times have changed - and not for the better. Today it seems that people look at pictures and see little more than what they depict, without bothering to pay attention to the hows or whys of the process.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | Holly Myers
There is something wonderfully peculiar about the paintings of Gegam Kacherian , but it's difficult to pinpoint just what it is. Each of the 15 works in his second solo show at Rosamund Felsen Gallery begins in a reasonable, even orthodox manner with an aerial view of a city skyline, or else the billowing clouds of a turbulent sky-scape. He has a knack for spatial atmospherics and most of these scenes would make for very handsome compositions in their own right. Over these, however, he layers a whirling miscellany of fantastical imagery: animals, figures, flora, architecture, and various totemic objects, all wound in ectoplasmic strands of abstract pigment.
NEWS
November 22, 2001
* Nancy Jackson (Rosamund Felsen Gallery, 2525 Michigan Ave., B-4, Santa Monica, [310] 828-8488). Drawings, paintings and sculpture, including an untitled work, above. Ends Dec. 22.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1997
* "Modotti and Weston: Mexicanidad"'--Photo of Diego Rivera (1923), above, by Edward Weston, is among those on exhibit at the Laguna Art Museum through Jan. 4. * "Windows on Wilshire"--Site-specific artworks by Cindy Bernard, Terry Braunstein and Gisela Weimann can be seen at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art through Dec. 31. * "Jim Shaw"--An exhibition of dream-based paintings, drawings and sculpture opens Saturday at Rosamund Felsen Gallery in Santa Monica, and runs through Dec. 20.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
A dozen new table-top sculptures by Patrick Nickell represent a significant evolution, which the artist also signals by titling his beguiling exhibition “Letting Go.” Serendipity has always been a prominent feature of his meandering abstractions, but now it has brought him to an implied - and sometimes even frank - figuration. Nickell's last show at Rosamund Felsen Gallery two years ago, which featured some of the mid-career artist's finest work, featured looping interlaces of painted plaster over a metal armature, painted and set on top of simple, homemade white tables that function as homey pedestals.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | Holly Myers
There is something wonderfully peculiar about the paintings of Gegam Kacherian , but it's difficult to pinpoint just what it is. Each of the 15 works in his second solo show at Rosamund Felsen Gallery begins in a reasonable, even orthodox manner with an aerial view of a city skyline, or else the billowing clouds of a turbulent sky-scape. He has a knack for spatial atmospherics and most of these scenes would make for very handsome compositions in their own right. Over these, however, he layers a whirling miscellany of fantastical imagery: animals, figures, flora, architecture, and various totemic objects, all wound in ectoplasmic strands of abstract pigment.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1993 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is chair, department of liberal arts and sciences, Otis School of Art and Design. and
Los Angeles artists, collectors and dealers meet September with a sense of anticipation. In L.A., the evening air turns slightly cooler, the populace regains a sense of urgency and by mid-month, there are smart turnouts at museum and gallery receptions. The season has begun. Many of the artists, at least, can talk about their summer shows in Europe at the Venice Biennale, the Basel art fair, the Vienna art museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1991 | SUVAN GEER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is something totally appealing about Marc Pally's large lyric abstractions. He can turn organic shapes into beguiling games of randomly meshing imagery by deftly shuffling his 15 panel canvases around the wall like two-dimensional Rubik's cubes. But Pally apparently longs for his paintings to do more than lilt, he wants them to challenge--at least intellectually.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1995
When my Marin County sister came to town, I could hardly wait to show Bergamot Station off. She bought two Lichtenstein paper plates, a stunning silver bracelet at Rosamund Felsen's (created by her San Francisco daughter), we marveled at the display of dishes--many styles we remembered from our first apartment days--at Track 16 and had a surprisingly good and cheap lunch. I feel as if a new playground has been opened in my back yard. MARTY RAUCH Los Angeles
Los Angeles Times Articles
|