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Rosamund Felsen Gallery

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January 17, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
A dozen new table-top sculptures by Patrick Nickell represent a significant evolution, which the artist also signals by titling his beguiling exhibition “Letting Go.” Serendipity has always been a prominent feature of his meandering abstractions, but now it has brought him to an implied - and sometimes even frank - figuration. Nickell's last show at Rosamund Felsen Gallery two years ago, which featured some of the mid-career artist's finest work, featured looping interlaces of painted plaster over a metal armature, painted and set on top of simple, homemade white tables that function as homey pedestals.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By David Pagel
By the time Monet got around to painting pictures of haystacks, viewers pretty much knew that his works were not about farming. All kinds of subjects, including perception, time, workmanship and mortality, as well as paint's capacity to make and convey meaning, played into the Impressionist's images of life in the French countryside. Times have changed - and not for the better. Today it seems that people look at pictures and see little more than what they depict, without bothering to pay attention to the hows or whys of the process.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | Holly Myers
There is something wonderfully peculiar about the paintings of Gegam Kacherian , but it's difficult to pinpoint just what it is. Each of the 15 works in his second solo show at Rosamund Felsen Gallery begins in a reasonable, even orthodox manner with an aerial view of a city skyline, or else the billowing clouds of a turbulent sky-scape. He has a knack for spatial atmospherics and most of these scenes would make for very handsome compositions in their own right. Over these, however, he layers a whirling miscellany of fantastical imagery: animals, figures, flora, architecture, and various totemic objects, all wound in ectoplasmic strands of abstract pigment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
A dozen new table-top sculptures by Patrick Nickell represent a significant evolution, which the artist also signals by titling his beguiling exhibition “Letting Go.” Serendipity has always been a prominent feature of his meandering abstractions, but now it has brought him to an implied - and sometimes even frank - figuration. Nickell's last show at Rosamund Felsen Gallery two years ago, which featured some of the mid-career artist's finest work, featured looping interlaces of painted plaster over a metal armature, painted and set on top of simple, homemade white tables that function as homey pedestals.
NEWS
November 22, 2001
* Nancy Jackson (Rosamund Felsen Gallery, 2525 Michigan Ave., B-4, Santa Monica, [310] 828-8488). Drawings, paintings and sculpture, including an untitled work, above. Ends Dec. 22.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1992 | DAVID PAGEL
In Jeff Gambill's beautifully crafted paintings, the space of the computer screen meets the memory of Surrealism. The smooth fusion mutates into an imaginary world of animated weightlessness. Here, meaty, organ-like forms float against abstract landscapes--flat fields of synthetic colors, neat symbols and 3-D grids. These landscapes don't describe the world outside; they map the interface between consciousness and technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1998
Anatomy Lesson: At Rosamund Felsen Gallery, the decidedly cool temperatures of Grant Mudford's black-and-white photographs documenting the construction of a hospital emergency wing could not be further away from the fevered pitch we usually associate with lifesaving medical procedures. Mudford documents inchoate sites that are in flux or that haven't yet taken on a recognizable identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1996 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Bantam Yard," Steve Rogers' quirky, endearing exhibition of glazed terra-cotta bas-reliefs and linoleum cuts at Rosamund Felsen Gallery, pays homage to chickens. Although it's strange for contemporary art to pay homage to anything, much less to chickens, Rogers manages to turn this seemingly anachronistic approach and extremely unstylish subject into an engaging show.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ann Preston's sculptures and drawings at Rosamund Felsen Gallery push their dissection of Expressionism (in the visual arts) to such an extreme pitch that they initiate a philosophical meditation on the simplest forms of human communication. This fiendish exhibition compels viewers to entertain the idea that our most basic facial expressions are not self-evident representations of inner states but inscrutable masks that conceal far more than they reveal.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1998 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dozens of lovely Asian women cavort in gorgeous American landscapes in Marnie Weber's L.A. solo debut. At Rosamund Felsen Gallery, 35 modestly scaled collages turn an age-old cliche on its ear by delivering just what it promises. Except for pencil-thin supermodels, the bodies of women have long been associated with untrammeled natural landscapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | Holly Myers
There is something wonderfully peculiar about the paintings of Gegam Kacherian , but it's difficult to pinpoint just what it is. Each of the 15 works in his second solo show at Rosamund Felsen Gallery begins in a reasonable, even orthodox manner with an aerial view of a city skyline, or else the billowing clouds of a turbulent sky-scape. He has a knack for spatial atmospherics and most of these scenes would make for very handsome compositions in their own right. Over these, however, he layers a whirling miscellany of fantastical imagery: animals, figures, flora, architecture, and various totemic objects, all wound in ectoplasmic strands of abstract pigment.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2008 | Leah Ollman, Ollman is a freelance writer.
"What if I could draw a bird that could change the world?" Kathleen Henderson poses the question in an urgent, childlike scrawl. "In a good way, I mean. In a good way." The words fan out across the body of a clumsy, angry, turkey-like creature drawn in dense black and blue. "I know this is not that bird," the text concludes. "I know that." If it's audacious to imagine art having world-changing power, it's also essential to act as though it does. Art wields whatever power we assign it.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2008 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
Artist Robert Rauschenberg used to say he intended for his work to fill the gap between art and life -- and the morning after his death, friends and colleagues were left struggling for words to describe the gap he left in their lives and in the art world. "My first thought was, the world won't be the same without him, but then I thought: We still have him," said Rosamund Felsen, owner of the Rosamund Felsen Gallery at Santa Monica's Bergamot Station, who heard of Rauschenberg's death Tuesday morning in a call from her daughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2008 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Karen Liebowitz's paintings of pretty women mending fishing nets, riding leviathans and blowing up inflatable pool toys blend classical mythology and pop culture in an ambitious mixture of fantasy-fueled Realism. The combo is loaded: provocative, promising and pointed, yet a bit too pedestrian to get viewers to suspend disbelief and abandon themselves to the pleasures of these beautifully painted pictures. Two gigantic oils on canvas anchor Leibowitz's exhibition at the Rosamund Felsen Gallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2006 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
A perceptive critic once aptly characterized a Steve Hurd painting as a "drunken Trojan Horse." That wasn't the painting's image but a description of the way his art operates: He pulls right up to the enemy gate with an audacious subterfuge, but he's making too much sloppy noise to get away with anything heroic. For art the enemy fortress is mass culture, which hogs society's spotlight while rarely making good on grandiose promises.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2006 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Florian Maier-Aichen gives an obvious nod to Edward Ruscha in his photograph "20th Century Fox," the smallest of eight mostly large-scale works from 2005 at Blum & Poe Gallery. It shows the famous movie-studio logo, sliced by a crisscrossed web of scanning searchlights. In 1962, Ruscha used the cinema logo to emphasize an up-to-the-minute, all-American graphic design, neatly throwing a monkey wrench into our assumptions about the relative merits of fine versus applied arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2005 | Leah Ollman, Times Staff Writer
Once upon a time there was a girl named Marnie Weber. She liked to dress up in costume and perform stories. She cut out pictures and glued them together in new combinations. She designed her own dollhouse, furnishing it from her imagination. Sounds like ordinary child's play -- and it is, but it's also the foundation of a prolific and ambitious artistic oeuvre, encompassing film and video, sculpture, installation, performance and photo collage. The L.A.
NEWS
November 22, 2001
* Nancy Jackson (Rosamund Felsen Gallery, 2525 Michigan Ave., B-4, Santa Monica, [310] 828-8488). Drawings, paintings and sculpture, including an untitled work, above. Ends Dec. 22.
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