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Rosanna Gamson

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Susan Josephs
In fall 2005, Rosanna Gamson had one of those jarring, do-or-die career epiphanies as she watched a production by the avant-garde Polish theater company Song of the Goat at UCLA. "The way those performers sang, danced and told a story moved and impressed me to the point where I knew I had to go learn how to do that," she recalls. A Los Angeles-based choreographer with a zest for cross-cultural collaboration and multimedia productions, Gamson wound up traveling twice to Poland and studying with three avant-garde theater companies faithful to the performance techniques created by experimental director Jerzy Grotowski.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2010
DANCE The centerpiece of CalArts' "Winter Dance" presentation is a restaging of Trisha Brown's landmark 1983 work "Set and Reset," here rechristened "Set and Reset/Reset," which features the institution's most esteemed dancers and a score by Laurie Anderson. Also slated for the evening are excerpts from Barak Marshall's "Rooster," Daniel Charon's "Juncture" and a new short piece from Rosanna Gamson, whose "Tov" premiered at the theater last spring. REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. 8:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2007 | Susan Josephs, Special to The Times
As a college dropout in New York in the late '70s and early '80s, Rosanna Gamson toyed with the idea of pursuing poetry as a career. She studied with such poets as Stanley Kunitz, Louise Gluck and Charles Simic and vicariously shared the experiences of friends enrolled in writing programs. Eventually she decided to return to academia -- this time to NYU's Tisch School of the Arts, where she went on to earn undergraduate and graduate degrees in dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Susan Josephs
In fall 2005, Rosanna Gamson had one of those jarring, do-or-die career epiphanies as she watched a production by the avant-garde Polish theater company Song of the Goat at UCLA. "The way those performers sang, danced and told a story moved and impressed me to the point where I knew I had to go learn how to do that," she recalls. A Los Angeles-based choreographer with a zest for cross-cultural collaboration and multimedia productions, Gamson wound up traveling twice to Poland and studying with three avant-garde theater companies faithful to the performance techniques created by experimental director Jerzy Grotowski.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1999 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"That's a good question," choreographer Rosanna Gamson calls out from the bleachers. It's rehearsal time for her dance company, Rosanna Gamson/World Wide, and a dancer has questioned a gap in getting from one move to the next. Gamson tries to think of an answer, not for the first time. Sometimes she doesn't have one. Sometimes she says, "Well, we'll just have to work that one out."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2009
The Sharon Disney Lund School of Dance presents three new works in a highly physical and visually rich program performed by CalArts' dancers. Colin Connor's "Flying in the Face of Time" features seven dancers and a live performance of Beethoven's "Grosse Fuge." Stephanie Nugent's "Would I Then Be," inspired by the 1992 film "Orlando" and Rosanna Gamson's "Ink" explores human relationships amid a landscape created by black silk. REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. 8:30 p.m. Fri. and Sat. $20. (213)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1998 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF
Today the issue of truth--what is true, what isn't--is omnipresent. In Rosanna Gamson's "Grand Hope Flower," the choreographer has constructed a dance-theater epic that ultimately reveals an authoritative, postmodern portrait of her adopted city, Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2010
DANCE The centerpiece of CalArts' "Winter Dance" presentation is a restaging of Trisha Brown's landmark 1983 work "Set and Reset," here rechristened "Set and Reset/Reset," which features the institution's most esteemed dancers and a score by Laurie Anderson. Also slated for the evening are excerpts from Barak Marshall's "Rooster," Daniel Charon's "Juncture" and a new short piece from Rosanna Gamson, whose "Tov" premiered at the theater last spring. REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. 8:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2002 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Give Rosanna Gamson credit. As artistic director of Rosanna Gamson/World Wide, the choreographer-dancer presented her company members in an evening of their own works over the weekend at Highways Performance Space. The seven pieces, performed under the banner "Terra Nova: New Dance/New Theater," ran the, well, gamut. On the plus side was Gamson's "Darker," exquisitely danced by Peter Kwong and the choreographer. With a live, mournful cello score by Shane W.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2001 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
In "Rita Goes to Hell," Rosanna Gamson creates Jungian dance theater from the concept that our deepest human drives and needs represent a kind of underworld: a realm of conflict and desire populated by powerful personifications (Love, Art, a judgmental Mother figure, etc.) that intersect with our conventional lives under major stress. However promising the idea, the result faltered badly in its premiere Thursday at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2009
The Sharon Disney Lund School of Dance presents three new works in a highly physical and visually rich program performed by CalArts' dancers. Colin Connor's "Flying in the Face of Time" features seven dancers and a live performance of Beethoven's "Grosse Fuge." Stephanie Nugent's "Would I Then Be," inspired by the 1992 film "Orlando" and Rosanna Gamson's "Ink" explores human relationships amid a landscape created by black silk. REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. 8:30 p.m. Fri. and Sat. $20. (213)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2007 | Susan Josephs, Special to The Times
As a college dropout in New York in the late '70s and early '80s, Rosanna Gamson toyed with the idea of pursuing poetry as a career. She studied with such poets as Stanley Kunitz, Louise Gluck and Charles Simic and vicariously shared the experiences of friends enrolled in writing programs. Eventually she decided to return to academia -- this time to NYU's Tisch School of the Arts, where she went on to earn undergraduate and graduate degrees in dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2005 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
In form and content, "Aura" is exactly what many people are afraid a modern dance performance will be but seldom is on major stages: a woozy grab bag of movement ideas that fail to connect with one another, showcase the dancers effectively or dramatize the synopsis in the program booklet. Presented at the REDCAT on Wednesday, this collaboration between Cecilia Appleton's Contradanza from Mexico and Rosanna Gamson/World Wide from L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2005 | Sara Wolf, Special to The Times
When the ambitious, binational dance-theater piece "Aura" receives its U.S. premiere tonight at REDCAT, the first words the audience hears, fittingly, will be "Traductor deseado" -- "Translator wanted." That's because at the heart of "Aura," which was inspired by and titled after a novella by Mexican literary lion Carlos Fuentes, lies the question that inaugurated the project 2 1/2 years ago: To what extent can people truly communicate when they do not share a language?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2002 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Give Rosanna Gamson credit. As artistic director of Rosanna Gamson/World Wide, the choreographer-dancer presented her company members in an evening of their own works over the weekend at Highways Performance Space. The seven pieces, performed under the banner "Terra Nova: New Dance/New Theater," ran the, well, gamut. On the plus side was Gamson's "Darker," exquisitely danced by Peter Kwong and the choreographer. With a live, mournful cello score by Shane W.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2001 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
In "Rita Goes to Hell," Rosanna Gamson creates Jungian dance theater from the concept that our deepest human drives and needs represent a kind of underworld: a realm of conflict and desire populated by powerful personifications (Love, Art, a judgmental Mother figure, etc.) that intersect with our conventional lives under major stress. However promising the idea, the result faltered badly in its premiere Thursday at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1999 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With her new work called "Lovesickness," which opened Thursday night,Rosanna Gamson creates a neat little valentine to desire--to constantly thwarted desire, actually, but the piece is so inventive and rhapsodic, it makes inevitable the idea that love and lack of it are constant, intimate companions. Gamson fills the small space at Highways in Santa Monica with constantly flowing events--dancing, songs, speech and projections.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2005 | Sara Wolf, Special to The Times
When the ambitious, binational dance-theater piece "Aura" receives its U.S. premiere tonight at REDCAT, the first words the audience hears, fittingly, will be "Traductor deseado" -- "Translator wanted." That's because at the heart of "Aura," which was inspired by and titled after a novella by Mexican literary lion Carlos Fuentes, lies the question that inaugurated the project 2 1/2 years ago: To what extent can people truly communicate when they do not share a language?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1999 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With her new work called "Lovesickness," which opened Thursday night,Rosanna Gamson creates a neat little valentine to desire--to constantly thwarted desire, actually, but the piece is so inventive and rhapsodic, it makes inevitable the idea that love and lack of it are constant, intimate companions. Gamson fills the small space at Highways in Santa Monica with constantly flowing events--dancing, songs, speech and projections.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1999 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"That's a good question," choreographer Rosanna Gamson calls out from the bleachers. It's rehearsal time for her dance company, Rosanna Gamson/World Wide, and a dancer has questioned a gap in getting from one move to the next. Gamson tries to think of an answer, not for the first time. Sometimes she doesn't have one. Sometimes she says, "Well, we'll just have to work that one out."
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