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Rosanne Cash

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2009 | Randy Lewis; August Brown; Greg Kot; Mikael Wood
Rosanne Cash "The List" (Manhattan Records) When Rosanne Cash was 18, her father, music legend Johnny Cash, gave her a list of 100 country, blues, folk and gospel songs he felt it vital that she learn to love. For her latest full-length release, she's chosen a dozen songs from that master list, and she brings the wistful mood that's infused much of her own writing to the material, which uniformly focuses on loss and heartache. The instrumentation is spare, yet elegant; this isn't the stripped-down music Johnny made with producer Rick Rubin in his final years, but it is often haunting just the same.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
It wasn't as if Carlene Carter was short on source material to draw on for her new album, “Carter Girl,” the first of her 37-year recording career in which she fully embraces her place in country music hiistory as the daughter of June Carter (Cash) and the granddaughter of Mother Maybelle Carter of the original Carter Family. “I made a list of every Carter Family song I knew that they had sung or I had sung when I was with them,” she said of her periodic drop-ins as a member of the Carter Sisters touring unit that included her mother and two aunts, Helen and Anita Carter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Within the space of two years, Rosanne Cash lost her mother (Vivian Liberto), her father (Johnny Cash) and stepmother (June Carter), deaths she wrestled with on her two previous albums: 2009's "The List" and 2006's "Black Cadillac. " She takes the longer view in "The River & the Thread," her sterling new album informed by her nearly 10 years as an adult orphan in the world. In deeply personal and insightful songs, Cash assesses who she is and where she came from as well as what has been bequeathed to her by her parents and by geography on the road to figuring out what truly is her own. The album's title stems from a line in the opening track, "A Feather's Not a Bird," in which she evenhandedly recognizes the forces that shape a person, with the understanding that it's up to each person how those elements direct their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Within the space of two years, Rosanne Cash lost her mother (Vivian Liberto), her father (Johnny Cash) and stepmother (June Carter), deaths she wrestled with on her two previous albums: 2009's "The List" and 2006's "Black Cadillac. " She takes the longer view in "The River & the Thread," her sterling new album informed by her nearly 10 years as an adult orphan in the world. In deeply personal and insightful songs, Cash assesses who she is and where she came from as well as what has been bequeathed to her by her parents and by geography on the road to figuring out what truly is her own. The album's title stems from a line in the opening track, "A Feather's Not a Bird," in which she evenhandedly recognizes the forces that shape a person, with the understanding that it's up to each person how those elements direct their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2010 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to cannily delivering a punch line, neither Russell Brand nor Jay Leno has anything on singer and songwriter Rosanne Cash. Arriving at New York hospital about four years ago for brain surgery to relieve long-misdiagnosed chronic pain, a nurse asked her what she was in for. "Liposuction," Cash deadpanned. "Her eyes grew wide, and she froze," Cash writes in her new book, "Composed: A Memoir. " "I could see her mentally running through the list of possible consequences of her misunderstanding: disciplinary board hearings, lawsuits, job loss ?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Rosanne Cash is facing brain surgery for a rare but benign condition and must cancel the last four dates on her "Black Cadillac" tour. The announcement was made Tuesday by Manhattan Records, the 52-year-old singer's music label. Cash is expected to make a full recovery and resume recording and touring next spring. "She does want everyone to know that it's a benign condition, and it's not life-threatening," said her manager, Danny Kahn. "It's nothing like a tumor or hemorrhage or anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Give Peace a Chance"--the all-star video featuring teen-age Sean Lennon's pale update of his father's metronomic lyrics recited in we-are-the-rappin'-world style--may be on the shelf now, but another John Lennon theme is alive in one of the new year's most moving pop videos. Rosanne Cash draws off from the former Beatles' idea--"All you need is love"--and gives it a more melancholy spin around the tape spool.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1988 | HOLLY GLEASON
Rosanne Cash is relaxing backstage at the Grand Ole Opry, where the taping of a show commemorating the Country Music Assn.'s 30th anniversary is in progress. Sharing a dressing room with several other artists who represent the new breed in country music (including her husband, Rodney Crowell), Cash calls out Beatles songs for the group to sing as they wait for their turn in makeup.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Country singer Rosanne Cash strummed a guitar and sang about child abuse, then told Missouri lawmakers her song would have to carry a parental warning if they enact pending legislation. The sponsor of the legislation, Rep. Jean Dixon, responded today that Cash's song is "nice, but totally irrelevant" to the proposed requirement that warning stickers go on albums, compact discs and cassettes with messages that glorify sex, drugs and violence.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1996 | Jean Rosenbluth
I've got a woman's life And it means everything to me. * That stark declaration, coming as it does near the end of Rosanne Cash's brilliant new album, is no less powerful for its superfluousness. After 11 songs (never mind the album's title) chronicling what it means to be female and 40 (or thereabouts), it's obvious to the listener that Cash would not have it any other way. Which is not to say that "10 Song Demo" is all sunshine and lollipops--far from it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2012 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
As much as anything he tried to do with his music and in his life, Woody Guthrie consistently stressed the "unity" in "community," an attitude that was fully embraced by some three dozen participants in Saturday's kickoff event in a yearlong national and international salute to the legacy of America's greatest folk troubadour, who would have turned 100 on July 14. Guthrie's son, Arlo, was musical ringmaster of the star-studded 31/2-hour demonstration of...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Marshall Grant, who played standup bass in Johnny Cash's original trio and helped create the legendary singer's distinctive, rhythmic sound in the 1950s, has died. He was 83. Grant, who remained with Cash as a bass player for more than two decades and later managed the Statler Brothers, died Sunday in a hospital in Jonesboro, Ark., according to a spokesman for Memorial Park Funeral Home and Cemetery in Memphis. A resident of Hernando, Miss., Grant was in Jonesboro last week for a Johnny Cash Music Festival to raise funds for the restoration of Cash's boyhood home.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010
It used to be easier to pick out music for your tune-obsessed relatives. There were far fewer releases than there are now, and unless it was a hot album, chances are good that with enough research one could find sounds desired yet unpurchased. No more. With the instant gratification of iTunes, Amazon and miscellaneous pirate portals, a music freak who wants a particular set of tunes probably already has it, and if not, doesn't want it. Still, that leaves a ton of music-centric gift options that aren't run-of-the-mill compact discs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2010 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to cannily delivering a punch line, neither Russell Brand nor Jay Leno has anything on singer and songwriter Rosanne Cash. Arriving at New York hospital about four years ago for brain surgery to relieve long-misdiagnosed chronic pain, a nurse asked her what she was in for. "Liposuction," Cash deadpanned. "Her eyes grew wide, and she froze," Cash writes in her new book, "Composed: A Memoir. " "I could see her mentally running through the list of possible consequences of her misunderstanding: disciplinary board hearings, lawsuits, job loss ?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2009 | Randy Lewis; August Brown; Greg Kot; Mikael Wood
Rosanne Cash "The List" (Manhattan Records) When Rosanne Cash was 18, her father, music legend Johnny Cash, gave her a list of 100 country, blues, folk and gospel songs he felt it vital that she learn to love. For her latest full-length release, she's chosen a dozen songs from that master list, and she brings the wistful mood that's infused much of her own writing to the material, which uniformly focuses on loss and heartache. The instrumentation is spare, yet elegant; this isn't the stripped-down music Johnny made with producer Rick Rubin in his final years, but it is often haunting just the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Rosanne Cash is facing brain surgery for a rare but benign condition and must cancel the last four dates on her "Black Cadillac" tour. The announcement was made Tuesday by Manhattan Records, the 52-year-old singer's music label. Cash is expected to make a full recovery and resume recording and touring next spring. "She does want everyone to know that it's a benign condition, and it's not life-threatening," said her manager, Danny Kahn. "It's nothing like a tumor or hemorrhage or anything.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM
' Can I have your autograph ?' he said, To the fat, blond actress. Y'know, I know everything you've done; Anyway, I hate divorces. --From "New Age" by the Velvet Underground * Rodney Crowell isn't fat, blond or an over-the-hill thespian, but one suspects he can relate to the protagonist of that old Velvets classic, whose fans know more about her intimate life than she might prefer. The song's author, Lou Reed, later put out an album called "Growing Up in Public."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2006 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
THE first sound is a toddler huffing into a microphone, a sound familiar to any parent who has vainly tried to coax a child into speaking for posterity. The next sound is the child's father. His voice, a hickory rumble, is instantly recognizable as the late, great Johnny Cash. "Rosanne, say 'C'mon.'
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2006 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
THE first sound is a toddler huffing into a microphone, a sound familiar to any parent who has vainly tried to coax a child into speaking for posterity. The next sound is the child's father. His voice, a hickory rumble, is instantly recognizable as the late, great Johnny Cash. "Rosanne, say 'C'mon.'
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2006 | Randy Lewis
Rosanne Cash "Black Cadillac" (Capitol) *** COMING to terms with the death of a parent is a monumental task for anyone. When that parent is a cultural titan on the level of a Johnny Cash, the layers of grief and loss grow even more complex.
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