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Rosario Ibarra

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1995 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosario Ibarra once seemed destined to live the tranquil existence of a well-to-do Mexican housewife, a doctor's spouse and mother of four in the relatively prosperous northern city of Monterrey. That all changed in 1975, when, during a period of brutal Mexican government repression targeting suspected leftists, security forces arrested her son and he "disappeared."
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WORLD
November 6, 2003 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
The Mexican Supreme Court on Wednesday gave a major boost to the government's efforts to bring so-called dirty-war criminals to justice by ruling that there was no statute of limitations on prosecuting those believed responsible for the kidnappings and disappearances of leftists in the 1970s and early 1980s.
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WORLD
November 6, 2003 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
The Mexican Supreme Court on Wednesday gave a major boost to the government's efforts to bring so-called dirty-war criminals to justice by ruling that there was no statute of limitations on prosecuting those believed responsible for the kidnappings and disappearances of leftists in the 1970s and early 1980s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1995 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosario Ibarra once seemed destined to live the tranquil existence of a well-to-do Mexican housewife, a doctor's spouse and mother of four in the relatively prosperous northern city of Monterrey. That all changed in 1975, when, during a period of brutal Mexican government repression targeting suspected leftists, security forces arrested her son and he "disappeared."
NEWS
December 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Prosecutors investigating the state's role in the disappearance of hundreds of leftists during the 1970s are demanding that 27 of the vanished come forward to testify, human rights leaders said. "I don't have the slightest idea what this means," said Rosario Ibarra, head of an organization for family members of Mexico's disappeared. Her son, last seen in 1975, is among those ordered to testify.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1999 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Rosario Ibarra, one of Mexico's most prominent human rights activists, the struggle for a better life among indigenous people in her country knows no boundaries. On Saturday, the fiery 71-year-old former member of the Mexican Senate spoke at Loyola Law School, urging support of a plebiscite in her country sponsored by the Zapatista Army of National Liberation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1988 | SERGIO MUNOZ, Sergio Munoz is executive editor of La Opinion, Los Angeles
The change in Mexico is irreversible. This is the claim heard throughout the country, even though not all matters concerning the presidential election have been settled yet. Nor have all Mexicans accepted the Federal Election Commission's declaration that Carlos Salinas de Gortari was the winner of the voting on July 6. I, for one, having witnessed this historical moment from within, believe that much has changed in Mexico. The people of Mexico are different than before.
WORLD
June 16, 2005 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
Mexico's Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that a special prosecutor could present genocide charges against former President Luis Echeverria for his alleged role in a 1971 massacre that left many student protesters dead or missing. In a 3-2 vote, the high court said a 30-year statute of limitations on the charges had not expired, as a judge ruled in July, because the clock had not started ticking until the leader left office in 1976.
NEWS
July 10, 1988 | Associated Press
Partial results from Mexico's presidential election show the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party winning, but with the lowest margin in its six decades of rule, sources said Friday. The figures from the Federal Electoral Commission, which a reliable source leaked to the press, show presidential candidate Carlos Salinas de Gortari ahead with 47.4% of the popular vote. Cuauhtemoc Cardenas of the leftist coalition National Democratic Front was second with 26.7%, and Manuel J.
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS and MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writers
His wealth, his girth and his crude style would seem to make Manuel J. Clouthier an easy target of typical government propaganda against privileged, right-wing politicians in Mexico. That suits Clouthier just fine: He thinks that riches, fat and a little straight talk are what Mexico needs these days.
NEWS
December 6, 1985 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Four bodies found in the ruins of the building that contained the Mexico City prosecutor's office were not like the thousands of others dug out after the devastating September earthquakes. For one thing, they were bound and gagged. And people who saw the bodies said they bore bruises and burns not likely to have been caused by the rubble that fell on them. These people, who asked not to be identified, concluded that the four, Colombians arrested in Mexico, were tortured while in custody.
OPINION
December 6, 1987 | SERGIO MUNOZ, Sergio Munoz is executive editor of La Opinion, the Spanish-language daily in Los Angeles.
Five characters in search of the presidency of Mexico have hit the campaign trail, and the question remains the same as in the past 60 years: Will any of them seriously challenge the government party's monopoly on power? Apart from Carlos Salinas de Gortari, the candidate of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), three other candidates are running from the left and two from the right. To paraphrase Dr.
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