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Rosario Marin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2004 | George Skelton
If a good personal story were the ticket to a Senate seat, Rosario Marin already could be drafting her swearing-in speech and calling Washington real estate agents. She'd be the heavy favorite to win the Republican Senate nomination March 2 and send Democratic U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer packing in November. Marin, 45 -- charming, articulate and tenacious -- has a compelling American Dream story with many subplots, as emerging Latino politicians often do.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2009 | Michael Rothfeld
A former member of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's Cabinet who resigned in March has paid $5,400 in fines to a state watchdog agency for violating a ban on accepting speaking fees, while saying administration officials knew what she was doing and never advised her to stop. Rosario Marin, who led the State and Consumer Services Agency for three years, admitted to three violations of the state's ethics law under a settlement with the California Fair Political Practices Commission.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2003 | Michael Finnegan, Times Staff Writer
Former U.S. Treasurer Rosario Marin took her first formal step Thursday toward joining the race for the Republican nomination to challenge Sen. Barbara Boxer's bid for reelection. In a written statement, Marin said she had formed an exploratory committee to prepare for a possible Senate campaign. The statement cast Boxer as too liberal for California, but offered little information on Marin's own ideological leanings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2004 | Richard Marosi, Times Staff Writer
After stepping down as U.S. treasurer last summer, Rosario Marin returned to the working-class Latino community of Huntington Park where she has lived since arriving from Mexico as a poor 14-year-old. She bought a new house on Hope Street. She painted it white and blue -- to go with the red roof. And she embarked on a campaign to convince her fellow Republicans that she is the candidate to knock Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer from office. Marin talks like it's destiny. "The future is now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosario Marin was burning up the corporate fast track, racking up promotions and eyeing an executive position in the banking industry. Then she gave birth to her son Eric, a boy with Down's syndrome. The struggle of coping with his disability propelled the young mother into politics, first as a child advocate, then as a two-time councilwoman in one of Los Angeles County's poorest cities. Now, Marin is on the verge of the biggest promotion of her life.
NEWS
May 14, 1995
Ten years ago, Rosario Marin gave birth to her son, Eric. The event changed her life more than she could possibly have anticipated because Eric was born with Down's syndrome, a chromosomal abnormality affecting intellectual and physical development. Marin made a decision that day to end her career in banking and devote herself to her son, eventually becoming "the Latino voice within the disabled community and the disabled voice within the Latino community."
NATIONAL
April 2, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. Treasurer Rosario Marin, the highest-ranking Latino woman in the Bush administration, is encouraging speculation that she will seek the Republican nomination to run for California's U.S. Senate seat held by Democrat Barbara Boxer. Marin, 44, invited reporters to a speech to Californians in Washington where she criticized Democratic Gov. Gray Davis over California's budget deficit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Since Councilwoman Rosario Marin's confirmation as U.S. treasurer, her colleagues on the council are trying to decide how to fill her seat. The remaining four council members must decide whether to appoint a new member or authorize a special election. They will have 30 days from the date of Marin's resignation, which will be official Thursday, the same day she will be sworn in as treasurer. On Monday night, Marin attended her last council meeting, where she announced her resignation. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Huntington Park City Councilwoman Rosario Marin, a Mexican immigrant who crusaded for the rights of disabled children in her rise through the Republican ranks, has been nominated to be U.S. treasurer by President Bush. The nomination, subject to U.S. Senate confirmation, was announced Tuesday by the White House press office. A council member since 1994, Marin said she was grateful to the president for the nomination.
OPINION
June 15, 1997
I read with interest "Is the Value We Place on a Child's Life Colorblind" by Gregory Rodriguez (Opinion, June 8) and found myself nodding in agreement with the perception of the perpetual division that tends to fascinate us as a society. Suddenly, however, it came to me how often we fail to recognize those instances where the opposite is true. Case in point is the death of Erika Izquierdo, an 11-year-old shot and killed in Huntington Park, a 98% Latino, mostly immigrant community, near Halloween in 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2004 | George Skelton
If a good personal story were the ticket to a Senate seat, Rosario Marin already could be drafting her swearing-in speech and calling Washington real estate agents. She'd be the heavy favorite to win the Republican Senate nomination March 2 and send Democratic U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer packing in November. Marin, 45 -- charming, articulate and tenacious -- has a compelling American Dream story with many subplots, as emerging Latino politicians often do.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2004 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
The United States must increase pressure on Mexico to improve its economic conditions and discourage illegal immigration, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Rosario Marin said Thursday in her first major policy speech of the campaign. The root cause of such movement has been masked by the contentious debates over immigrant driver's licenses and President Bush's proposal for a temporary guest-worker program, she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2003 | Michael Finnegan, Times Staff Writer
Former U.S. Treasurer Rosario Marin took her first formal step Thursday toward joining the race for the Republican nomination to challenge Sen. Barbara Boxer's bid for reelection. In a written statement, Marin said she had formed an exploratory committee to prepare for a possible Senate campaign. The statement cast Boxer as too liberal for California, but offered little information on Marin's own ideological leanings.
NATIONAL
May 23, 2003 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Thursday nominated a trusted White House aide, Josh Bolten, to be his budget director -- moving to fill a key post with a domestic policy expert who has broad experience in law, finance and politics. If confirmed by the Senate, Bolten will step down as Bush's deputy chief of staff. His title belied his far-flung responsibilities, which have ranged from homeland security matters to trade. He also acted as a gatekeeper to the Oval Office, helping decide who visits with Bush.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. Treasurer Rosario Marin, the highest-ranking Latino woman in the Bush administration, is encouraging speculation that she will seek the Republican nomination to run for California's U.S. Senate seat held by Democrat Barbara Boxer. Marin, 44, invited reporters to a speech to Californians in Washington where she criticized Democratic Gov. Gray Davis over California's budget deficit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Since Councilwoman Rosario Marin's confirmation as U.S. treasurer, her colleagues on the council are trying to decide how to fill her seat. The remaining four council members must decide whether to appoint a new member or authorize a special election. They will have 30 days from the date of Marin's resignation, which will be official Thursday, the same day she will be sworn in as treasurer. On Monday night, Marin attended her last council meeting, where she announced her resignation. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2004 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
The United States must increase pressure on Mexico to improve its economic conditions and discourage illegal immigration, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Rosario Marin said Thursday in her first major policy speech of the campaign. The root cause of such movement has been masked by the contentious debates over immigrant driver's licenses and President Bush's proposal for a temporary guest-worker program, she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2004 | Richard Marosi, Times Staff Writer
After stepping down as U.S. treasurer last summer, Rosario Marin returned to the working-class Latino community of Huntington Park where she has lived since arriving from Mexico as a poor 14-year-old. She bought a new house on Hope Street. She painted it white and blue -- to go with the red roof. And she embarked on a campaign to convince her fellow Republicans that she is the candidate to knock Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer from office. Marin talks like it's destiny. "The future is now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosario Marin was burning up the corporate fast track, racking up promotions and eyeing an executive position in the banking industry. Then she gave birth to her son Eric, a boy with Down's syndrome. The struggle of coping with his disability propelled the young mother into politics, first as a child advocate, then as a two-time councilwoman in one of Los Angeles County's poorest cities. Now, Marin is on the verge of the biggest promotion of her life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Huntington Park City Councilwoman Rosario Marin, a Mexican immigrant who crusaded for the rights of disabled children in her rise through the Republican ranks, has been nominated to be U.S. treasurer by President Bush. The nomination, subject to U.S. Senate confirmation, was announced Tuesday by the White House press office. A council member since 1994, Marin said she was grateful to the president for the nomination.
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