Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRosario Robles
IN THE NEWS

Rosario Robles

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 15, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Mexico City Mayor Rosario Robles signed an initiative that would decriminalize abortion when the life of the mother is threatened or when the fetus has been diagnosed with severe birth defects. The move came days after legislators in the central state of Guanajuato voted to prohibit abortion in cases of rape, heightening fears about the conservative agenda of the newly powerful National Action Party.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a battle that highlights increasing demands here for accountability in politics, four city lawmakers filed a complaint Monday urging prosecutors to investigate possible irregularities during former Mexico City Mayor Rosario Robles' recently completed term. It was the latest twist in a battle that began in April when Robles brought a libel suit against the newspaper Reforma over a report suggesting that her administration had failed to provide receipts for about $600 million in expenses.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2001
Public officials in a democratic society know they are subject to public scrutiny and sometimes harsh criticism, whether they like it or not. They also know that the press must be able to carry out its watchdog role without interference. But in ever more democratic Mexico, there are still some politicians who have not gotten the word. Take, for instance, the former head of Mexico City's government, Rosario Robles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2001
Public officials in a democratic society know they are subject to public scrutiny and sometimes harsh criticism, whether they like it or not. They also know that the press must be able to carry out its watchdog role without interference. But in ever more democratic Mexico, there are still some politicians who have not gotten the word. Take, for instance, the former head of Mexico City's government, Rosario Robles.
NEWS
June 12, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a battle that highlights increasing demands here for accountability in politics, four city lawmakers filed a complaint Monday urging prosecutors to investigate possible irregularities during former Mexico City Mayor Rosario Robles' recently completed term. It was the latest twist in a battle that began in April when Robles brought a libel suit against the newspaper Reforma over a report suggesting that her administration had failed to provide receipts for about $600 million in expenses.
WORLD
August 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Rosario Robles announced her resignation as head of Mexico's third-largest political party, the leftist Democratic Revolution. The announcement followed media reports that the party's debt was spiraling out of control. But she said there was an internal campaign to discredit and undermine her authority.
WORLD
March 11, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The former head of Mexico's biggest left-wing party quit the organization in a corruption scandal. Rosario Robles, who headed the Democratic Revolution Party from 2002 to 2003, was linked with a businessman who was shown in a televised video last week apparently bribing another party member. Robles said at a news conference that she had "committed errors," but did not elaborate. The politician in the video has said the money was a political donation.
NEWS
March 25, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The top female politician in Mexico was declared the winner of last week's chaotic election to lead the country's third-largest political party. With polling places in all 31 states and Mexico City accounted for, former Mexico City Mayor Rosario Robles received 417,226 votes for the leadership of the leftist Democratic Revolution Party. Sen. Jesus Ortega, who placed second, will be secretary-general. The election was marred by violence, fraud charges and infighting.
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | Reuters
Mexico's capital got its second leftist mayor in a row Tuesday when former labor leader Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador took office, pledging to fight crime by fighting poverty. Lopez Obrador, 46, who ran on a campaign slogan of "valiant honesty," is the second democratically elected leader of Mexico City, which was governed by a regent named by the president until 1997. Mexico's business and cultural center, the capital is notorious for its pollution and crime.
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
Two years after he became the first elected mayor in Mexico City's modern history, Cuauhtemoc Cardenas has announced he will leave his post to dedicate his full attention to his presidential campaign. Cardenas' indefinite leave of absence, which must be approved by the city council, will cap two years in which he has been stymied by the deep-rooted problems of the world's second-largest city and growing divisions in his left-center Democratic Revolution Party.
NEWS
August 15, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Mexico City Mayor Rosario Robles signed an initiative that would decriminalize abortion when the life of the mother is threatened or when the fetus has been diagnosed with severe birth defects. The move came days after legislators in the central state of Guanajuato voted to prohibit abortion in cases of rape, heightening fears about the conservative agenda of the newly powerful National Action Party.
WORLD
February 4, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez
MEXICO CITY - President Enrique Peña Nieto said Tuesday that his government would invest the equivalent of about $3.4 billion in social and infrastructure programs for the beleaguered Mexican state of Michoacan, where armed vigilante groups have been clashing with a drug gang. The program, which Peña Nieto announced in Morelia, the state capital, represents a significantly larger investment in Michoacan than the one unveiled last month by his social development secretary, Rosario Robles, who promised to spend about $225 million.
WORLD
September 16, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Two powerful storms gripped Mexico in a pincer movement Monday, dumping tons of rain on both coasts, forcing closures of roads and airports in several cities and killing at least 34 people. Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong called the weather phenomenon “historic” and said two-thirds of national territory was suffering from the two storms' impact, affecting more than 1.2 million people. President Enrique Peña Nieto interrupted Independence Day ceremonies Monday, called an emergency Cabinet meeting and then rushed to Acapulco, the Pacific coast tourist city in one of the hardest-hits states, Guerrero.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|