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Rosarito Beach

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NEWS
December 20, 1990 | HILARY DOLE KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At first glance, the Rosarito Beach Cafe might be taken for just another Mexican diner. Its street-front window, lit up in bright orange neon, and its fairly plain decor do nothing to dispel this initial impression. But then I looked at the menu and realized there wasn't a single combination plate to be found. Another clue: no complimentary chips.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Here's a beachy getaway that's good now or later. Travelzoo offers a two-night stay at the Rosarito Beach Hotel in Baja, Mexico, for $249 for two people. The deal comes with breakfast, massages and even a bottle of wine. The deal: The Rosarito Beach Escape from Travelzoo offers an inexpensive seaside getaway in Mexico . The resort is about 155 miles from Los Angeles. For two people, it costs $249 for a two-night stay and $329 for a three-night stay. Extras include two 60-minute massages, a bottle of wine and half a dozen margaritas, and daily breakfast.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1995 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's been a couple of years since Sandy Smith stopped serving lunch at his Rosarito Beach Cafe in Ventura. It wasn't that lunch was unpopular. It was that Smith, owner and executive chef of the 9-year-old establishment, wanted to preserve his health and well-being. "Lunch was always successful, but being the chef was just nuts," he said. "All of the food preparation had to happen before 10:30 in the morning. As it is, we prepare all day for dinner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
SAN YSIDRO - Two eternal truths about crossing the Mexican border: It's worth the drive to Rosarito Beach for Tacos El Yaqui. And coming back is hell. In the last several years, crossing the border from the Mexican side has become a test of nerves. Two-, three-, even four-hour waits are typical. As you burn gas, jockey for position in the lanes and swerve to avoid the vendors and begging children who weave on foot between cars, you are consumed by feelings of helplessness and rage that cannot be assuaged by all the striped blankets, Sponge Bob piñatas and plaster Last Suppers in the world.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When I used to eat at Rosarito Beach Cafe at its former location on Main Street, I was always struck by the glaring dichotomy between its funky storefront ambience and its flashy exotic menu. In that location, the upscale Mexican cuisine, the fancy wine glasses and the white lines seemed so incongruous as to be almost discordant. What saved the place from ridicule or pity was the marvelous food.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2002 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal to turn this tourist resort just south of the U.S. border into a major energy hub has unleashed a fury of resentment among local leaders. They are waging a fierce fight against a sophisticated corporate public relations campaign in favor of a liquid natural gas terminal. Just last Tuesday, a dozen global energy company executives in dark suits filed into a banquet room at the Rosarito Beach Hotel to pitch their plan to build a $460-million gas plant in the heart of town.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1997 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that would create more than 1,000 jobs in Baja California over the next two years, Sharp Electronics Corp. of Japan said Monday that it will build a mammoth manufacturing facility in the once-sleepy resort town of Rosarito Beach, Mexico. A spokeswoman at Sharp's U.S. headquarters in Mahwah, N.J., said the facility's initial phase will cost $27 million, involve almost half a million square feet of plant space and be used for assembly of 1 million televisions and 1.
MAGAZINE
May 14, 2000 | CHRIS KRAUL
The mayor of Rosarito Beach is overwhelmed. He has a population explosion on his hands that has obliterated the city's flimsy infrastructure and meager financial resources. Thousands of his constituents live in shantytowns with no sewage or paved streets in the hills east of Mexico's touristy Baja California beach area. The town is running out of water and schools are so overcrowded that hundreds of youths are left to roam the streets, a law-and-order time bomb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
SAN YSIDRO - Two eternal truths about crossing the Mexican border: It's worth the drive to Rosarito Beach for Tacos El Yaqui. And coming back is hell. In the last several years, crossing the border from the Mexican side has become a test of nerves. Two-, three-, even four-hour waits are typical. As you burn gas, jockey for position in the lanes and swerve to avoid the vendors and begging children who weave on foot between cars, you are consumed by feelings of helplessness and rage that cannot be assuaged by all the striped blankets, Sponge Bob piñatas and plaster Last Suppers in the world.
TRAVEL
March 9, 2009 | Christopher Reynolds
The music thumps, the lights flash, the shot glasses wait for willing lips. But the bouncers are reduced to kicking at the curb, hoping somebody, anybody, will round the corner. Friday nights are slow lately in Rosarito Beach's party zone, and everyone knows the drug war is to blame. Hundreds of corpses discovered in and near Tijuana. Some of them headless, others dissolved in barrels of lye. People hear that, and they stay away. At least, most people do.
TRAVEL
March 9, 2009 | Christopher Reynolds
The music thumps, the lights flash, the shot glasses wait for willing lips. But the bouncers are reduced to kicking at the curb, hoping somebody, anybody, will round the corner. Friday nights are slow lately in Rosarito Beach's party zone, and everyone knows the drug war is to blame. Hundreds of corpses discovered in and near Tijuana. Some of them headless, others dissolved in barrels of lye. People hear that, and they stay away. At least, most people do.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2009 | Associated Press
The Justice Department's Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives has taken the unusual step of urging college students to avoid parts of northern Mexico during spring break. The bureau's Los Angeles field division said Monday that it discourages travel to Tijuana and Rosarito Beach. It noted that both cities, which are just south of San Diego, have had a lot of drug-fueled violence. Rosarito has long been a popular destination for Southern California students on spring break.
WORLD
November 12, 2008 | Richard Marosi, Marosi is a Times staff writer.
Mayor Hugo Torres has always pitched his seaside city as a cut-rate paradise. But even this relentless hometown booster is stumped these days: How do you sell the Mexican good life in the midst of a drug war? The city's bustling main drag, Benito Juarez Boulevard, has been the scene of two shootings since September, including a drive-by slaying of a 15-year-old boy and three others in a pet store filled with frenzied puppies and canaries. Gunmen shot down one police officer guarding a park.
REAL ESTATE
June 22, 2008 | Kathy Price-Robinson, Special to The Times
When Don and Gigi Maurizio set out to gut and redo their condo in Rosarito Beach, Mexico, they didn't have to hold a yard sale or haul stuff to a thrift shop or the dump. The Claremont couple simply alerted the staff at La Paloma, the gated development where their beachfront condo is located, that whatever was in the two-bedroom, two-bathroom unit -- sofas, televisions, cookware, dishes -- was free for the taking.
WORLD
June 22, 2006 | Richard Marosi, Times Staff Writer
Mexican authorities discovered the decapitated bodies of three police officers and a fourth man Wednesday near an empty lot in the seaside town of Rosarito Beach, about 15 miles south of the border. The officers had gone missing Tuesday after responding to a report of a kidnapping. Witnesses said that the officers were intercepted by about 100 heavily armed, masked men dressed as Mexican federal agents, said a spokesman for the Baja California state attorney general's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2005 | Richard Marosi, Times Staff Writer
A funeral procession for the slain police chief wound its way through a dusty hillside neighborhood Sunday as authorities moved to restore a sense of order in time for the high season in this popular tourist destination. Carlos Bowser Miret, the 49-year-old director of public safety, was ambushed outside his home Saturday morning by two masked assailants -- one of whom sprayed his car with several rounds from an AK-47 assault rifle. Police have not identified suspects or determined a motive.
REAL ESTATE
May 2, 2004
"One Is Not Enough," the story on second homes by Allison B. Cohen, April 18, is right on. I live in Rosarito Beach -- 20 miles south of San Diego. Since 9/11, our real estate market has really been brisk with those California second-home buyers, with Arizona, Oregon, Washington state and Nevada right behind California. Diane Gibbs Rosarito Beach, Mexico
WORLD
June 22, 2006 | Richard Marosi, Times Staff Writer
Mexican authorities discovered the decapitated bodies of three police officers and a fourth man Wednesday near an empty lot in the seaside town of Rosarito Beach, about 15 miles south of the border. The officers had gone missing Tuesday after responding to a report of a kidnapping. Witnesses said that the officers were intercepted by about 100 heavily armed, masked men dressed as Mexican federal agents, said a spokesman for the Baja California state attorney general's office.
REAL ESTATE
May 2, 2004
"One Is Not Enough," the story on second homes by Allison B. Cohen, April 18, is right on. I live in Rosarito Beach -- 20 miles south of San Diego. Since 9/11, our real estate market has really been brisk with those California second-home buyers, with Arizona, Oregon, Washington state and Nevada right behind California. Diane Gibbs Rosarito Beach, Mexico
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An Oxnard filmmaker has become a central actor in a police corruption drama unfolding in a Mexican beach town about 20 miles south of San Diego. Lex Miles, 41, says all he wanted to do was film young Americans on spring break in Rosarito Beach, Mexico. Then opportunity knocked -- quite literally -- on March 26, when city police officers came to the door of the house Miles and his crew were renting.
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