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Rose Ann Demoro

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2005 | Paul Pringle, Times Staff Writer
Her name is Rose Ann DeMoro, but in Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's office she might be better known as Trouble. DeMoro is the 56-year-old, Missouri-born, Bruce Springsteen-loving executive director of the California Nurses Assn., a 60,000-member labor union that has led the fight against much of Schwarzenegger's policy agenda. In David-vs.-Goliath fashion, the battle appears to be going DeMoro's way.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2005 | Paul Pringle, Times Staff Writer
Her name is Rose Ann DeMoro, but in Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's office she might be better known as Trouble. DeMoro is the 56-year-old, Missouri-born, Bruce Springsteen-loving executive director of the California Nurses Assn., a 60,000-member labor union that has led the fight against much of Schwarzenegger's policy agenda. In David-vs.-Goliath fashion, the battle appears to be going DeMoro's way.
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NEWS
November 2, 1986
The California Nurses Assn. said it has broken off contract negotiations with management of the University of California hospitals and plans to ask for federal mediation.
OPINION
September 30, 2005
Re "Hospital Halts Organ Program," Sept. 27 The scandal at St. Vincent Medical Center is just one more example of why profit needs to be taken out of healthcare, even in a supposed nonprofit hospital. In a country where tens of millions cannot afford health insurance, where healthcare costs are the No. 1 cause of personal bankruptcy, where drug companies boast obscene profits and where public hospitals are forced to shut their doors for lack of funds, it is horrific yet not surprising that body parts are sold to the highest bidder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2009 | Evelyn Larrubia
A California nurses union will join with two others across the country to create what they say will be the nation's largest registered nurses union. The new group, the United American Nurses-National Nurses Organizing Committee, will merge United American Nurses, the Massachusetts Nurses Assn. and California Nurses Assn./National Nurses Organizing Committee, which together represent 150,000 nurses. Rose Ann DeMoro, president of the 85,000-member California Nurses Assn., said the move is meant to capitalize on labor's longed-for passage of the proposed Employee Free Choice Act, which would revamp labor laws to make union membership easier.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1998 | Julie Marquis
Nurses at St. Vincent Medical Center in Los Angeles have voted to join the California Nurses Assn. CNA officials are calling the action the first major hospital union victory in several years. The 179-119 vote means the union will represent the hospital's 350 registered nurses in negotiating a labor contract. CNA Executive Director Rose Ann DeMoro said the union drive was sparked by concerns over "woefully inadequate staffing." A St.
OPINION
April 19, 2005
Re "Nurses Union Leader Is a Tonic for Governor's Foes," April 17: The coalition allied against the governor finds satisfaction in his declining popularity. Meanwhile, the budget deficit grows and looms on the horizon as far out as analysts can see. Rose Ann DeMoro's not being a healthcare professional may explain her inability to differentiate a symptom from a disease. The squeeze on funding for essential public services is not left/right, Republican/Democrat or private/public sector.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2000 | Nancy Cleeland
Registered nurses at Long Beach Memorial Hospital narrowly rebuffed unionization this week, while union drives at three smaller area hospitals were successful. The slim margin in the Long Beach vote, which was 591-581, was a stunning setback for the California Nurses Assn., the fastest-growing nurses union in the state. CNA Director Rose Ann DeMoro claimed that the hospital illegally pressured nurses. She said the union would appeal the results to the National Labor Relations Board.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2000 | Nancy Cleeland
Unionized nurses and administrators at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles have ended a bruising two-year dispute by signing a first labor contract, both sides announced. Nurses, who were originally offered a pay freeze, will receive raises of at least 7.5% over three years, with some lower-paid nurses receiving substantially more. A hospital proposal to cut premium pay for weekend work was removed.
NEWS
March 26, 1998 | Associated Press
A tentative contract agreement was reached Wednesday between Kaiser Permanente and thousands of registered nurses at hospitals and clinics throughout Northern California. The agreement calls for a 12% raise over the next four years, according to Rose Ann DeMoro, executive director of the California Nurses Assn. Kaiser Permanente spokesman Tom Debley said management was "very pleased with the agreement." "It's a win-win for the nurses and Kaiser Permanente," he said.
OPINION
October 8, 2006
Re "U.S. Ruling Could Eliminate Union Eligibility for Millions," Oct. 4 As a registered nurse with more than 35 years at the bedside, I applaud the decision that permanent charge nurses have a supervisory role. Contrary to the assertions being made by California Nurses Assn. Executive Director Rose Ann DeMoro, this is good for nursing. Why? For too long, charge nurses have had all the responsibilities of a manager without being recognized as such by nurses and hospital administrators alike.
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