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Rose Center For Earth And Space

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NEWS
January 27, 2001 | From Associated Press
A leading science museum has quietly shaken up the universe by suggesting that Pluto is not necessarily a planet but may be just a lump of ice. The suggestion comes from scientists at the Rose Center for Earth and Space, which opened last year at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. There is a model of Jupiter hanging from the ceiling at the center. There are Saturn with its rings, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Neptune and Uranus.
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NEWS
January 27, 2001 | From Associated Press
A leading science museum has quietly shaken up the universe by suggesting that Pluto is not necessarily a planet but may be just a lump of ice. The suggestion comes from scientists at the Rose Center for Earth and Space, which opened last year at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. There is a model of Jupiter hanging from the ceiling at the center. There are Saturn with its rings, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Neptune and Uranus.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2000 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
For decades, New Yorkers have been drawn to the American Museum of Natural History as much for its musty, nostalgic charm as for its remarkable collections of obscure species and exhibits on human evolution. Its dark rooms of life-like dioramas--from reconstructions of a foraging cave family to an embalmed gorilla in its mountain habitat--conjure a Victorian era of specimen jars and butterfly nets. The Rose Center for Earth and Space brings that image into the present with a bang.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2000 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
For decades, New Yorkers have been drawn to the American Museum of Natural History as much for its musty, nostalgic charm as for its remarkable collections of obscure species and exhibits on human evolution. Its dark rooms of life-like dioramas--from reconstructions of a foraging cave family to an embalmed gorilla in its mountain habitat--conjure a Victorian era of specimen jars and butterfly nets. The Rose Center for Earth and Space brings that image into the present with a bang.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2000
What's happening the next few weeks: * "From Bruegel to Rubens: Netherlandish and Flemish Drawings" features more than 100 works spanning the Gothic through the Flemish Baroque periods, at the Morgan Library, 29 E. 36th St., through April 30. (212) 685-0610.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2002 | Susan Freudenheim
The design for a new $400-million interactive museum focusing on news and the media was unveiled Tuesday in Washington by the nonprofit Freedom Forum. Opened in 1997 in nearby Arlington, Va., the Newseum attracted more than 2.25 million visitors in its nearly five years of operation before closing in preparation for the new building. New York-based Polshek Partnership Architects designed the 531,000-square-foot structure, which will be at Pennsylvania Avenue and 6th Street N.W., between the U.S.
TRAVEL
August 13, 2000
An 86,000-square-foot science center focusing on astronomy, with what's described as a cutting-edge planetarium, debuts Saturday in the hills near Oakland. The facility replaces an observatory and planetarium, about 10 minutes away, that dates to 1915. Chabot (pronounced sha-BO) Space & Science Center, on 13 acres of East Bay parkland, will open with two refractor telescopes for public use: an 8-inch and a 20-inch.
TRAVEL
February 20, 2000
New York City added an architectural landmark this weekend with the opening of the Frederick Phineas & Sandra Priest Rose Center for Earth and Space, a 120-foot-high "cosmic cathedral" of glass and steel at the American Museum of Natural History.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
Thousands of people on Saturday flocked to the opening of the Museum of Natural History's new $210-million planetarium complex, praised for its daring architecture and use of technology to portray a realistic picture of the cosmos. "Very impressive, very well done. My kids love it," Madelyn English, of Bernardsville, N.J., said of the Rose Center for Earth and Space. Eleven-year-old Michael Naumowicz of Maspeth gave the facility a thumbs-up as well: "It's so exciting."
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
A group of American Indians says a 16-ton meteorite that will be the main attraction at the Museum of Natural History's new planetarium is a holy tribal object and should be returned to Oregon. The meteorite--about the size of a small car--will be displayed in the planetarium's main hall when it opens Saturday. The meteorite hit Earth more than 10,000 years ago and was moved by glacial ice to a hillside in West Linn, Ore.
MAGAZINE
October 10, 2004 | Leslee Komaiko
If you've always yearned to say "Little Rock" in the same breath as "London, Paris and Bilbao," now's the time. The William Jefferson Clinton Presidential Center and Park is to open next month, but critics are already calling it one for the architectural history books.
NEWS
June 27, 2001 | LINDA HALES, WASHINGTON POST
Not so long ago, everything cool was black. Sound systems, laptops, cell phones and designer T-shirts all contributed to a somber tableau of minimalist chic. Then designers developed coloritis. In the iMac era, Apples and New Beetles rolled out in kiwi green and lemon yellow. Vacuum cleaners were transformed into decorative objects by hues once reserved for motorcycle helmets. Pasta forks popped up in tangerine plastic. So what if orange clashed with the red clam sauce?
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