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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2009
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OPINION
July 11, 2013 | MEGHAN DAUM
The crisis communications firm Hennes-Paynter knows what it's doing. On Monday, it released a video statement from Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight, the women who were held captive in a Cleveland basement for years until they were discovered and rescued in May. Looking healthy and speaking clearly, if sometimes haltingly, the women expressed their gratitude for the outpouring of public support and asked for privacy so they can continue to...
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OPINION
November 5, 2006
Re "40 years have seen openness, civility fade as cynicism gains," column, Nov. 2 I doubt the rose-colored version of the political past that George Skelton paints. I wasn't alive to see Ronald Reagan as governor, but I understand that he said, "If it takes a bloodbath to silence the demonstrators, let's get it over with," in reference to the 1960s student unrest at Berkeley. Is this quotation apocryphal? Students there started the Free Speech Movement in 1964, a watershed that led to the antiwar movement.
HEALTH
July 25, 2011 | By Regina Nuzzo, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If Cupid wanted to improve his game with science, he'd shoot first, then hand out rose-colored glasses with instructions attached: To be worn when viewing your relationship and your partner's personality or body. For best results, keep using well after "I do. " Remove carefully at your own risk. Psychologists have long known that new love can be blind and new lovers delusional. Research has shown that newlyweds exaggerate their partner's good qualities, forget the bad ones, rate their own relationship with annoying superiority and so on. But newer research tantalizingly suggests that this myopia is good for more than driving your single friends crazy.
MAGAZINE
August 25, 1991
Your illustrations for the features on Manuel Noriega and Jacques Derrida suggest that your art editor views life through rose-colored fruit-jar bottoms. ED KYSAR Reseda
OPINION
January 12, 2007
Re "Through rose-colored microscopes," Current, Jan. 7 Puzzled that all of the scientists and thinkers were male who responded to the question "What are you optimistic about?" I went to the website for the online salon Edge. Sadly, out of 160 respondents, only 17 were female. Still, I wonder why you chose not to include any women in your article. Did you regard a feminine perspective insignificant? KAREN LING Porterville, Calif.
TRAVEL
November 6, 1988
For years I've tried to explain why I return each year to Venice, why I find it the most special place on this planet. Thanks to Ali MacGraw, "Voluptuous Venice" (Oct. 23), in Traveling in Style, all my thoughts and feelings were beautifully expressed. Also, there's a special glow adding to the beauty of this city from the rose-colored street lamps along the Riva dei Schiavoni during an evening stroll. JOHN BRANDT Beverly Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1990
The president of El Salvador is seeing his situation through rose-colored glasses. He should come to Los Angeles and live incognito and learn from his fellow Salvadorans just how "so-called" the democracy is in that country. He can try to "red herring" us by pointing out actions of FMLN or actions by his forces done to discredit FMLN, but he cannot conceal the overwhelming use of killing and torture done by forces under his direction. MARLENE BRONTE, Los Angeles
NEWS
February 13, 1985 | From the Washington Post
Have you ever wanted to look at life through rose-colored glasses? The American Optical Corp. of Southbridge, Mass., has invented a way to look at video screens through rose-colored "video terminal glasses." The glasses come in three tints--pink, gray and blue--to reduce glare and brighten the characters on a video screen, says Neal David, American Optical's senior marketing manager.
TRAVEL
June 26, 1994
I must comment on recent letters in the Travel section. It seems many Americans think the world is one big Disneyland. One letter explained that Petra should have a shuttle system ("Letters," March 27). The best way to see Petra is to walk in. One of my fondest memories is walking in at sunrise and seeing the color changes on the rose-colored walls. The article about the Orient Express ("On Different Tracks," May 8) shows how truly ugly Americans can be. The best way to meet Thais and see Thailand is in second class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2009
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2009 | MARK SWED, MUSIC CRITIC
Popular culture and classical music have had different sorts of relationships over the years. Old-timers conjure up a time when radio stations supported great orchestras, television networks commissioned opera and Leopold Stokowski could shake hands with Mickey in "Fantasia" and then go home to Garbo. Classical music has never left the cinema, Broadway stage, airways or gossip columns. But relationships change. For the most part rose-colored glasses have come off. Once portrayed as stick-figure heroes, classical artists are now more likely shown as deeply flawed misfits, outsiders to an era obsessed by pop culture like none before it. Still, they are seen, and seen quite a bit in current films and plays that attempt to engage with the subject of classical music in pop culture terms.
OPINION
January 12, 2007
Re "Through rose-colored microscopes," Current, Jan. 7 Puzzled that all of the scientists and thinkers were male who responded to the question "What are you optimistic about?" I went to the website for the online salon Edge. Sadly, out of 160 respondents, only 17 were female. Still, I wonder why you chose not to include any women in your article. Did you regard a feminine perspective insignificant? KAREN LING Porterville, Calif.
OPINION
January 7, 2007 | Richard Dawkins;Max Tegmark;Jonathan Haidt;James O'Donnell;Steven Pinker;Jean Pigozzi;Jared Diamond;J. Craig Venter;Roger Highfield
EVERY YEAR SINCE 1996, the online salon Edge has e-mailed a question to scientists and thinkers about the state of the world. This year's question was: "What are you optimistic about?" Below are excerpts of some of the responses. For full responses (and those of other contributors), go to www.edge.org.
OPINION
November 17, 2006
Re "Policy on pepper spray questioned," Nov. 15 A combative suspect spits what could be disease-loaded saliva at the arresting officer. To prevent another spit, the officer pepper sprays the suspect and the spitting stops. Only American Civil Liberties Union lawyers and other liberals who line up behind them would consider the officer's actions appalling. I suggest that ACLU lawyer Catherine Lhamon go into the dirty, dangerous side of society and arrest someone who will do whatever it takes to avoid being arrested.
OPINION
November 5, 2006
Re "40 years have seen openness, civility fade as cynicism gains," column, Nov. 2 I doubt the rose-colored version of the political past that George Skelton paints. I wasn't alive to see Ronald Reagan as governor, but I understand that he said, "If it takes a bloodbath to silence the demonstrators, let's get it over with," in reference to the 1960s student unrest at Berkeley. Is this quotation apocryphal? Students there started the Free Speech Movement in 1964, a watershed that led to the antiwar movement.
OPINION
February 4, 1990
I remember the first time I ever saw Yosemite. It was 1967 and I was 6 years old. There were still some fish in the Merced River. The meadows were not wiped out from the hordes of tourists that Jones claims infest the valley "only 3 or 4 weekends each summer." Over the last 22 years I have visited Yosemite many times, spent summers working there. Make no mistake about it, Yosemite has changed. It has changed in a thousand little ways; less flora, more trash, more cars, more people.
TRAVEL
August 11, 1985
The deluge of letters (June 30) critical of Michael Carlton's June 16 article on travel in China prompts me to write in his defense. In May I visited China for the second time, crisscrossing that country and enjoying much of the experience. However, Carlton is absolutely right about the problems of travel there. Standards of airline scheduling and safety are far below those of the United States, and standards of sanitation are deplorable. The water is not potable and the food is often contaminated.
NATIONAL
January 1, 2005 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
Every hour is happy hour at Modern Drunkard magazine. It's barely 3 p.m., and Frank Kelly Rich, who edits the bimonthly homage to getting soused, is draining his gin and tonic and eyeing a whiskey bottle on the top shelf. Moments later, he's drinking that as well. A huge bar dominates the office, the fridge is stocked with beer and the handful of employees is invited to drink. Smoking is OK too.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2004 | Matea Gold and Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writers
Sen. John F. Kerry had solemn matters on his mind last week as he took on such weighty issues as nuclear proliferation, bioterrorism and an overtaxed military. But even as he charged that the Bush administration had failed to effectively confront those concerns, the presumed Democratic presidential nominee tried to strike an optimistic tone. "I didn't come to Missouri tonight to point out what was wrong," Kerry told a crowd of about 1,500 gathered in a Kansas City airport hanger Wednesday.
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