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Rose Elizabeth Bird

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1986
Much has been made of my critical comments about Chief Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird, which appeared in the last edition of the American Lawyer. I believe it important to clarify the criticism that was never directed at the chief justice in her judicial role. I believe Rose Elizabeth Bird to be a great chief justice. I am critical of her political ineptitude. She has attempted a statewide campaign without a campaign manager because she is not a "manageable" person; that may be the very quality that makes her a great chief justice.
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NEWS
January 7, 2000
A public memorial service for former state Supreme Court Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird will be held Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Skirball Cultural Center's Magnin Auditorium, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Brentwood. Speakers will include Cruz Reynoso, former California Supreme Court justice; Delores Huerta, co-founder and secretary-treasurer of the United Farm Workers; Rep. Howard L. Berman (D-Mission Hills); Judge Stephen Reinhardt of U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1986
Your "Is He Kidding?" editorial is fascinating. Let's change the year to 1977, change the President to the governor, and change Daniel A. Manion to Rose Elizabeth Bird and you'll have an accurate commentary for the era. WARREN F. JONES Glendale
NEWS
December 6, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Former California Chief Justice Rose Bird, who died Saturday, will probably be remembered more for the anger she aroused in voters than for her pioneering legal and political career, her friends and colleagues said Sunday. Bird, 63, died at Stanford University Hospital on Saturday afternoon after many years of battling breast cancer.
NEWS
January 1, 1986
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors registered its disapproval of the California Supreme Court for overturning nearly all death penalty cases that have come before it while Rose Elizabeth Bird has been chief justice. Three supervisors present unanimously passed a resolution expressing concern that the court under Bird has overturned 41 of 44 death sentences. Supervisors approving the resolution were Mike Antonovich, Kenneth Hahn and Deane Dana.
NEWS
January 7, 1987
Gov. George Deukmejian formally appointed state Supreme Court Justice Malcolm M. Lucas as chief justice of California. Deukmejian had announced his intention to name Lucas chief justice on Nov. 26, but he could not make the formal appointment until Rose Elizabeth Bird's term had expired. Lucas, 59, a law partner of Deukmejian in the 1960s, served 12 years as a federal district judge before Deukmejian appointed him as associate justice of the state Supreme Court in 1984.
NEWS
December 31, 1985
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors today voted its disapproval of the California Supreme Court for overturning nearly all the death penalty cases that have come before it while Rose Elizabeth Bird has been chief justice. Since 1978, a supervisors' resolution said, the court under Bird has overturned 41 out of 44 death sentences. The present at today's board session, Mike Antonovich, Kenneth Hahn and Deane Dana.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1988
Howard Rosenberg's gushing praise for Rose Elizabeth Bird as a KABC-TV commentator was pure poppycock ("Bird Commentaries Open New Vistas at Channel 7," March 16). Rosenberg lauds Bird's "thoughtful and eloquent" commentaries, citing her lament that the Rev. Jesse Jackson may be denied the Democratic nomination for President "merely because he's black." That is simplistic and insulting to millions of people like me who would never vote for Jesse Jackson, not because he's black, but because of many other factors such as the fact that he never held public office, called Jews "hymies," hugged Yassar Arafat.
NEWS
January 30, 1988 | Associated Press
Former California Chief Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird, who frequently charged that the news media was too superficial in covering her tenure, auditioned for a job as a commentator at KGO-TV, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. Bird, who was voted out of office in November, 1986, has made several studio tapes, according to Saturday's editions of the newspaper.
NEWS
January 7, 2000
A public memorial service for former state Supreme Court Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird will be held Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Skirball Cultural Center's Magnin Auditorium, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Brentwood. Speakers will include Cruz Reynoso, former California Supreme Court justice; Delores Huerta, co-founder and secretary-treasurer of the United Farm Workers; Rep. Howard L. Berman (D-Mission Hills); Judge Stephen Reinhardt of U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Rose Elizabeth Bird, who headed the California Supreme Court for nearly 10 years before voters ousted her in a historic recall, died Saturday after a long fight with breast cancer. She was 63. Bird died about 3 p.m. at Stanford University Hospital, where she had been admitted less than two weeks ago. The exact cause of her death has not been determined, said Raj Chabre, a friend of Bird.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Rose Elizabeth Bird, who headed the California Supreme Court for nearly 10 years before voters ousted her in a historic recall, died Saturday after a long fight with breast cancer. She was 63. Bird died about 3 p.m. at Stanford University Hospital, where she had been admitted less than two weeks ago. The exact cause of her death has not been determined, said Raj Chabre, a friend of Bird.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1998 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rose Elizabeth Bird, rarely seen in public since being ousted from the California Supreme Court more than a decade ago, temporarily abandoned her reclusiveness Thursday to be honored by 200 loyal fans. Much of the state treated Bird as a pariah in 1986 when the electorate--upset by her anti-death penalty rulings--voted the chief justice and two high court colleagues out of office.
NEWS
November 15, 1995 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The tall, matronly woman with chin-length blond hair dropped in at an East Palo Alto poverty law clinic and asked if she could volunteer. She gave her name, but it rang no bells. Staff members assumed she was a bored homemaker and assigned her to the copying machine. For months, the woman photocopied documents for the clinic's busy young lawyers. It took a tip from a law school dean to alert the staff to her identity: Rose Elizabeth Bird, the former chief justice of the California Supreme Court.
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | GAILE ROBINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many people have made changes in their appearance, but not everyone acknowledges make-overs or even admits to a close encounter with an image consultant. And, of course, some have self-helped themselves into political correctness. Sometimes a small change--such as the cut of a jacket--can make all the difference. At other times, candidates use cosmetic surgeons to carve a new image. Consider these cases.
NEWS
April 20, 1992 | Jerry Hicks
CHANGING GUARDS: Orange County played a big role in reviving capital punishment in the state. . . . Local prosecutor Tony Rackauckas--now a judge--led two statewide groups which eventually brought the 1986 ouster of then-Chief Justice Rose Bird for her anti-death penalty voting record. More than two-thirds in the county voted against her and two others. . . . "If Rose Bird were still on the bench we would not be seeing (the likelihood of) Robert Harris' execution," says county Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1990
In response to "Death Penalty Controversy Trails Bird," Part A, May 14: Calling (former chief justice of California) Rose Elizabeth Bird a victim is akin to calling Ted Bundy a victim. The real victims are the California voters and the loved ones of the long dead who are still waiting for justice. While claiming to be unbiased regarding the death penalty, this audacious woman reversed 62 out of 62 capital cases. I have kept the following anonymous quote at my desk since her recall: "The Bird court may have acquired enormous stature among the intellectuals and the law schools, but it hasn't had a lot of credibility with the average citizen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1990
In response to "Death Penalty Controversy Trails Bird," Part A, May 14: Calling (former chief justice of California) Rose Elizabeth Bird a victim is akin to calling Ted Bundy a victim. The real victims are the California voters and the loved ones of the long dead who are still waiting for justice. While claiming to be unbiased regarding the death penalty, this audacious woman reversed 62 out of 62 capital cases. I have kept the following anonymous quote at my desk since her recall: "The Bird court may have acquired enormous stature among the intellectuals and the law schools, but it hasn't had a lot of credibility with the average citizen.
NEWS
May 14, 1990 | JOEL SAPPELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the height of her power, Rose Elizabeth Bird spent her days ensconced in a stately office that had been occupied since the 1920s by a succession of some of the most influential figures in state government--the chief justices of California. From behind a broad wooden desk, Bird wrote for hours on matters of life and death, producing legal opinions that eventually would help bring to an end her tumultuous 11-year tenure on the California Supreme Court.
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