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NEWS
August 6, 1995 | CAROLYN THOMPSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As a teen-ager who would be lobotomized just a few years later, Rosemary Kennedy chronicled a life of tea dances, dress fittings and trips to Europe in diaries that her mother ordered tossed out with the trash. But Rose Kennedy's secretary didn't listen. She hung on to the aging leather-bound journals and included them in a new book about her decade with the Kennedy clan. Rosemary, now 76, has been living in obscurity in a Wisconsin convent school since the 1941 lobotomy.
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NEWS
May 31, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), who fought in Congress for the money to put Boston's noisy elevated Central Artery underground and replace it with 30 acres of open space, dedicated the future greenway to his mother. The Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway will stretch from Boston's historic North End, where the senator's late mother was born, through Chinatown and the financial district with a year-round garden and cultural center in the wharf district.
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NEWS
July 22, 1986 | Associated Press
Rose Kennedy quietly marked her 96th birthday today. She suffered a stroke in 1984.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | CAROLYN THOMPSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As a teen-ager who would be lobotomized just a few years later, Rosemary Kennedy chronicled a life of tea dances, dress fittings and trips to Europe in diaries that her mother ordered tossed out with the trash. But Rose Kennedy's secretary didn't listen. She hung on to the aging leather-bound journals and included them in a new book about her decade with the Kennedy clan. Rosemary, now 76, has been living in obscurity in a Wisconsin convent school since the 1941 lobotomy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1990 | RICK DU BROW
Maria Shriver is doing "a little remembrance about Grandma" this weekend on NBC's "Sunday Today" show. Grandma is the extraordinary Rose Kennedy, matriarch of the American political dynasty, who will be 100 years old on July 22. And Shriver, her 34-year-old granddaughter, doesn't need press credentials to get into the family compound at Hyannisport, Mass., where a celebration will be held Sunday kicking off the centennial birthday week.
NEWS
January 25, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his office wall in Washington, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) told the mourners in St. Stephen's Church here Tuesday, there is a framed letter from his mother chastising him for saying "if I was President." As Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, then in her 90s, wrote in her "Dear Teddy" note, "You should have said 'if I were President,' because it is a position contrary to fact."
NEWS
May 31, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), who fought in Congress for the money to put Boston's noisy elevated Central Artery underground and replace it with 30 acres of open space, dedicated the future greenway to his mother. The Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway will stretch from Boston's historic North End, where the senator's late mother was born, through Chinatown and the financial district with a year-round garden and cultural center in the wharf district.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Rose Kennedy, who turns 100 on July 22, follows the news on television and radio, enjoys spending time with her family and is "still fussy about the way she looks," according to one of her daughters. "Mother is alert and feels pretty well for 100," Eunice Kennedy Shriver said in an interview with McCall's magazine. "She loves having people around her, and all of us come--the children, the grandchildren and the growing numbers of great-grandchildren." Mrs.
NEWS
July 20, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Kennedy matriarch Rose Kennedy, not her husband, got the family into politics, four of her five surviving children say in a story being published Sunday, her 100th birthday. The children told Parade magazine that their father, Joseph P. Kennedy, a businessman and U.S. ambassador to Great Britain, had other concerns besides politics. "Dad was interested in achievement, not necessarily politics," said Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.
NEWS
January 24, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long before computers, she kept index cards detailing the health and school records of each of her nine children. At dinner time, she posted a newspaper article to serve as the evening's discussion topic. To imbue her brood with a sense of history, she marched them off to Revolutionary War battle sites. If any of them fell out of line, her only surviving son, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, remembered, there was Rose Kennedy's "mean right hand" to contend with.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | T. H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; T. H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times.
The idea of using Rose Kennedy as the central figure of a one-woman show seems inevitable. She was on the sidelines of many major events in the 20th Century, in the background behind a husband who was one of the movers and shakers of political and financial affairs (and other affairs), mother of a president and three senators.
NEWS
May 19, 1995 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Robert Koehler writes regularly about theater for The Times.
It would be easy to interpret the Los Angeles arrival of Elizabeth Garry's play about the life of Rose Kennedy, "One Perfect Rose," as a theater eulogy cashing in on the memory of the Kennedy family matriarch, who died Jan. 22 at 104. It would also be wrong. Actor and co-producer Mary E. Holt, whom Garry approached six years ago with the one-character play, has been struggling most of the time since to secure a full production.
NEWS
March 24, 1995 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
First published more than 20 years ago, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy's autobiography has been reissued with a brief introduction by four of her surviving children. Completed when the author was 84, the book is primarily a personal history fleshed out by diary notes, letters and a generous selection of photographs.
NEWS
January 25, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his office wall in Washington, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) told the mourners in St. Stephen's Church here Tuesday, there is a framed letter from his mother chastising him for saying "if I was President." As Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, then in her 90s, wrote in her "Dear Teddy" note, "You should have said 'if I were President,' because it is a position contrary to fact."
NEWS
January 24, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long before computers, she kept index cards detailing the health and school records of each of her nine children. At dinner time, she posted a newspaper article to serve as the evening's discussion topic. To imbue her brood with a sense of history, she marched them off to Revolutionary War battle sites. If any of them fell out of line, her only surviving son, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, remembered, there was Rose Kennedy's "mean right hand" to contend with.
NEWS
January 23, 1995 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, whose 10 decades of life encompassed extraordinary triumphs and epic tragedies, died Sunday at the age of 104. Mrs. Kennedy died from complications of pneumonia at 5:30 p.m. at the family compound in Hyannis Port, Mass., said Scott Ferson, a spokesman for her son, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.). "Mother passed away peacefully today," the senator said in a statement. "She had a long and extraordinary life, and we loved her deeply.
NEWS
January 23, 1995 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, whose 10 decades of life encompassed extraordinary triumphs and epic tragedies, died Sunday at the age of 104. Mrs. Kennedy died from complications of pneumonia at 5:30 p.m. at the family compound in Hyannis Port, Mass., said Scott Ferson, a spokesman for her son, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.). "Mother passed away peacefully today," the senator said in a statement. "She had a long and extraordinary life, and we loved her deeply.
BOOKS
March 1, 1987 | Robert Dallek, Dallek, the author of several books on recent American political and diplomatic history, is writing a biography of Lyndon B. Johnson
Americans have a national love affair with royalty. "Even as the people would reject a king," John Kennedy said, "their hearts tugged for the symbols of royalty." Our aversion for monarchical rule and titles of nobility are matched by a fascination with celebrities: self-made movie stars, sports heroes, television personalities and prominent politicians, rich and famous folks with whom most of us can identify. We relish both their success and their failings.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | PAUL COLFORD
Michael Korda, the novelist and editor-in-chief of Simon & Schuster, says that if Shakespeare had seen a good biography of the Kennedys, he would have written a play about them in 48 hours. "The family's story is the one Shakespearean and Greek tragedy that we've had in 200 years of American history," he says. "It has everything--greed, murder, dynasty and power."
BOOKS
November 22, 1992 | Martin F. Nolan, An associate editor of the Boston Globe, Nolan began reporting on the Kennedys in 1961
He has had hagiographers aplenty, pals and sycophants. Revisionists, debunkers and cynics have also sat in judgment. Finally, after 29 years of fevered and fruitless speculation about his death, John F. Kennedy has a biographer. Nigel Hamilton, as ambitious as any Kennedy, decided that "no one had ever written a complete life, in the English tradition." That tradition includes Hamilton's three-volume biography of Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery.
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