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Rose Polsky

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1993
In response to "The Gospel According to Peter," by Diane Haithman (April 18): While Peter Sellars is busy writing off established museums and performing arts complexes as "irritating pieces of real estate," I find it curious to note that his own personal track record of work includes performances of "Nixon in China" at the Los Angeles Music Center. Has this establishment now become "irritating" because the Los Angeles Music Center Opera turned down his "Death of Klinghoffer" project this year?
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1995 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Rose Polsky describes her admiration for the great women who founded modern dance and her feelings of connectedness to the tradition, her hands keep stretching out to the front and back, as if she's tracing a long continuum. Somewhere behind her right shoulder are the monumental ghosts of Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham and Hanya Holm, at whom she keeps glancing with awe.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS
"When I walk around in life, I'm this energetic, funny person, but when I go into the studio I don't want to be," says the 32-year-old choreographer Rose Polsky, whose company performs Thursday at Loyola Marymount College. "I'm obsessed with themes like disappointment, death, madness--things I feel in my life and see in other people's lives . . . . My work involves a great sensitivity to those things in life that are simultaneously peculiar and beautiful, or painful and strong."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1993
In response to "The Gospel According to Peter," by Diane Haithman (April 18): While Peter Sellars is busy writing off established museums and performing arts complexes as "irritating pieces of real estate," I find it curious to note that his own personal track record of work includes performances of "Nixon in China" at the Los Angeles Music Center. Has this establishment now become "irritating" because the Los Angeles Music Center Opera turned down his "Death of Klinghoffer" project this year?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1990 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Ostensibly, they were sharing a program. But when Rose Polsky and Sarah Elgart, along with their respective companies, actually put foot to board for Thursday's Generator Eight Festival at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, the divvying up looked far from even. Not to worry. Polsky proved, with her entry (against three of Elgart's), that less is emphatically more, that a subject plumbed and long thought about resonates in the mind's eye--while a hastily made collage vanishes with the first blink.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1988
Nominally, Rose Polsky is a phenomenon of the '80s--now that it's fashionable to flag one's ethnic background. Yet when the Sarah Lawrence graduate and her dancers performed at Loyola Marymount University on Thursday night one had to admire the judgment and integrity of Rose Polsky. As a choreographer she does belong to a quasi-archeological genre that communes with the past. What's in a name? History. Her dances are wordless scripts evoking primordial memories.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
Listening to the taped voice of a woman in her 80s happily recounting small, charmed moments from her long-ago courtship by a tailor was the high point of Rose Polsky's "Ida Stayed With Me," performed Friday night at Studio Stage, Santa Monica College. The dancing, by Polsky's four-member company and nine guests, was another matter--dated in style and threadbare in imaginative resources.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1995 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Rose Polsky describes her admiration for the great women who founded modern dance and her feelings of connectedness to the tradition, her hands keep stretching out to the front and back, as if she's tracing a long continuum. Somewhere behind her right shoulder are the monumental ghosts of Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham and Hanya Holm, at whom she keeps glancing with awe.
NEWS
April 3, 1994
Rose Polsky, a part-time faculty member at Loyola Marymount University in Westchester, was awarded a Choreographers Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. She was one of 40 recipients out of 417 applicants for the $7,000 fellowship. Polsky, a Redondo Beach resident, is the artistic director of the Los Angeles-based dance company Rose Polsky and Dancers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1995
This letter is in response to the review of Rose Polsky's concert that appeared in Calendar ("Airy Similarities in New Works by Polsky," Oct. 9). I had the opportunity to be in Los Angeles and attend Ms. Polsky's concert. The review was deeply disturbing to me on a factual, conceptual and philosophical level. On the factual level, Rose Polsky choreographed the solo that was attributed to Meredith Monk. Basically your reviewer says that Ms. Polsky is not as good a choreographer as Meredith Monk, because Ms. Monk's solo was so strong.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1990 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Ostensibly, they were sharing a program. But when Rose Polsky and Sarah Elgart, along with their respective companies, actually put foot to board for Thursday's Generator Eight Festival at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, the divvying up looked far from even. Not to worry. Polsky proved, with her entry (against three of Elgart's), that less is emphatically more, that a subject plumbed and long thought about resonates in the mind's eye--while a hastily made collage vanishes with the first blink.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
Listening to the taped voice of a woman in her 80s happily recounting small, charmed moments from her long-ago courtship by a tailor was the high point of Rose Polsky's "Ida Stayed With Me," performed Friday night at Studio Stage, Santa Monica College. The dancing, by Polsky's four-member company and nine guests, was another matter--dated in style and threadbare in imaginative resources.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1988
Nominally, Rose Polsky is a phenomenon of the '80s--now that it's fashionable to flag one's ethnic background. Yet when the Sarah Lawrence graduate and her dancers performed at Loyola Marymount University on Thursday night one had to admire the judgment and integrity of Rose Polsky. As a choreographer she does belong to a quasi-archeological genre that communes with the past. What's in a name? History. Her dances are wordless scripts evoking primordial memories.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS
"When I walk around in life, I'm this energetic, funny person, but when I go into the studio I don't want to be," says the 32-year-old choreographer Rose Polsky, whose company performs Thursday at Loyola Marymount College. "I'm obsessed with themes like disappointment, death, madness--things I feel in my life and see in other people's lives . . . . My work involves a great sensitivity to those things in life that are simultaneously peculiar and beautiful, or painful and strong."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS
Crisp, urgent and mysterious, Young-Ae Park's gestures imbued "Da Mong" ("Dream Layers") with a precision and directness missing in several other pieces on the Choreographers Showcase program on Saturday at Barnsdall Park Gallery Theatre. Her body stilled but never slack, Park used her hands to portray the life span of an insect. They stirred the air, came to rest on her tilted, "sleeping" head and fluttered with subtle control.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1994
David Gritten's "Growing Into the Role" (Jan. 6) contains wording I feel compelled to address. In his article on actor Ralph Fiennes, who plays Nazi work-camp commandant Amon Goeth in Steven Spielberg's "Schindler's List," Gritten says, "It is almost impossible to square his demeanor with that of Amon Goeth, a man capable of randomly shooting Jewish prisoners with a rifle from the balcony of his villa overlooking the work camp." As Maya Angelou has said, "I am human, therefore nothing human is beyond me."
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