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Rose Portillo

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HOME & GARDEN
July 31, 2003 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Rose Portillo's grandfather left a tiny Texas border hamlet that grew up around a Native American pueblo, became a scenic painter at Paramount, and by the sweat of his brow, bought the Silver Lake Spanish deco she calls home. That was 50 years ago. There's no telling what her grandfather would make of the place now. Grinning Mexican Day of the Dead skeletons mock the living from every corner. Painted roses climb from the dining room wall onto the ceiling.
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HOME & GARDEN
July 31, 2003 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Rose Portillo's grandfather left a tiny Texas border hamlet that grew up around a Native American pueblo, became a scenic painter at Paramount, and by the sweat of his brow, bought the Silver Lake Spanish deco she calls home. That was 50 years ago. There's no telling what her grandfather would make of the place now. Grinning Mexican Day of the Dead skeletons mock the living from every corner. Painted roses climb from the dining room wall onto the ceiling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1997
'Angry Brown Hat'--An entry in Sunday Calendar's theater listings mistakenly identified the director of "The Last Angry Brown Hat," tonight at USC's Bovard Auditorium. Rose Portillo is not associated with this production.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1992 | Aleene MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Anniversary Time "Out in Front," a weekend of theater, comedy, music, poetry and dance celebrating the Mark Taper Forum's 25th season, will take place on the Taper's stage Oct. 1-4. American Indian musician John Trudell and his Graffiti Man band and the Latino comedy troupe Culture Clash will perform each evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
In "Properties of Silence," an intriguing hourlong dreamscape from About Productions, 17th century rebel and literary troublemaker Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz leaves her own world to visit a brave if deeply flawed new one: late 20th century Phoenix, land of real estate mavens and swimming pool peddlers. Something is off here. The "vital mainspring of the human clock," as Sor Juana puts it, needs repair.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1987 | RAY LOYND
Actress Rose Portillo attempts a difficult labor of love in her one-woman sortie, "I Can't Be Here Today," at the Margo Albert Theater in Lincoln Park. As writer and performer, she indulges in a highly personal family odyssey--a solo memory flight largely focusing on her durable, beloved, late Aunt Flora. The show benefits from spare, effective production values and flexible staging by director Tomas J. Benitez.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1993
A response to Pat Launer's review of "The King of the Kosher Grocers" at the Old Globe in San Diego ("As Predictable as Corned Beef on Rye," Sept. 10): We take issue with Launer's negative phrase "a reheated multicultural (and stereotypical) smorgasbord." What is negative about honestly portraying the cultural diversity in most of our neighborhoods? What is stereotypical about a retired Chicano farm worker, an aging African-American who's falling in love with a Jewish-American widow and an ailing Jewish-American grocer showing genuine affection for one another?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1997 | JANA J. MONJI
"Two Rooms," Lee Blessing's drama about a couple separated by a stormy sea of political agendas, is given a lackluster presentation at the Jewel Box Theater. The year is 1985. The husband Michael (Henry Woronicz) is being held hostage in Beirut while the wife Laine (Rose Portillo) waits for his safe release, caught between the U.S. government (Iona Morris) and the snooping media (Steven Culp).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Severo Perez's film of Tomas Rivera's " . . . and the earth did not swallow him" is as sincere and earnest as the Mexican American family it depicts with such love and respect. Although the film, which is based on a classic Chicano novel, could use more of a sense of style and pace, it is nevertheless an affecting experience, beautifully photographed and illuminating the hard lives of a small Texas community of migrant farm workers who regularly follow the harvest to Minnesota.
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