Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRose Shoshana
IN THE NEWS

Rose Shoshana

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2010 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
One of the many casualties of the earthquake that hit Mexico City in 1985 was the folk art known as fotoescultura , or photo-sculpture. Before the earthquake, a small group of artisans skilled in transforming beloved photographic portraits into handmade sculptural keepsakes occupied the same building on Donceles Street in the historic center of the city. After the earthquake destroyed the building, according to Rose Shoshana, owner of Rose Gallery in Santa Monica, almost all of the practitioners closed up shop.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2010 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
One of the many casualties of the earthquake that hit Mexico City in 1985 was the folk art known as fotoescultura , or photo-sculpture. Before the earthquake, a small group of artisans skilled in transforming beloved photographic portraits into handmade sculptural keepsakes occupied the same building on Donceles Street in the historic center of the city. After the earthquake destroyed the building, according to Rose Shoshana, owner of Rose Gallery in Santa Monica, almost all of the practitioners closed up shop.
Advertisement
HOME & GARDEN
May 5, 2005 | Barbara King, Times Staff Writer
But for that felicitous wrong turn in the dark of night, Rose Shoshana might never have been able to say: "It's interesting how Frank Gehry has always sort of played a part in our lives." A line like that has the potential to captivate the audience at any dinner party in L.A. Here, let me refill your glass. Please go on.
HOME & GARDEN
May 5, 2005 | Barbara King, Times Staff Writer
But for that felicitous wrong turn in the dark of night, Rose Shoshana might never have been able to say: "It's interesting how Frank Gehry has always sort of played a part in our lives." A line like that has the potential to captivate the audience at any dinner party in L.A. Here, let me refill your glass. Please go on.
NEWS
April 8, 2004 | Susan Carpenter
If you don't know the name Dorothea Lange, you know her pictures -- iconic, black-and-white photographs of the destitute and desperate during the Dust Bowl and Great Depression. Less known are her photographs from the 1950s and early 1960s, when Lange focused her lens on city life, her family and travels to Vietnam and Indonesia. It is these images that are on display at Rose Gallery in Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2007 | Hugh Hart
On the wall of his studio darkroom in Mexico City, Manuel Alvarez Bravo posted a scrap of paper on which he'd scrawled "Hay Tiempo." "There is time." In 2002, time ran out for Alvarez Bravo, who died at age 100. But by then, with photographs recasting everyday Mexican City street life as lyrical dreamscapes, he had created a celebrated body of work rooted in Mexico's post-revolution artistic renaissance that flourished in the 1930s.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1993 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for The Times.
In June, Los Angeles photographer Deanne Shartin was asked to shoot pictures of a group of children, patients at UCLA Medical Center, for a brochure for a hospital support group, The Kids' Benefit. The brochure was to promote the sale of Christmas cards designed by children in the hospital. Shartin, who has taught art to kids for many years, noticed how these children perked up when they posed for her, and how interested they were in touching the camera and finding out how it worked.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1992 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for Westside/Valley Calendar.
Internationally recognized Chicago artist Ed Paschke has painted unique visions of diverse American cultural icons for more than 25 years. His subjects have ranged from Chicago strippers, pimps and prostitutes to Marilyn Monroe and Elvis; from Lee Harvey Oswald to Abraham Lincoln. Often though, his electrified, mask-like portraits, which resonate from bold lines and colors of the highest key, depict anonymous, but not uninteresting people steeped in mixed messages.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2007 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
IMAGINE a world where there are no judgments, no slurs or "bad" words; a place where women move in independence, where age and sexual orientation are moot; where time has adopted a different meter and language is a convergence of deeply understood gestures -- a transcendent place where past, future and present merge for one-sixtieth of a second. This is no figment of the imagination. These are the truths that have taken form in photographer Graciela Iturbide's eye.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|