Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoseanne Television Program
IN THE NEWS

Roseanne Television Program

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1989 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
The new TV series was going to be called "Life and Stuff," or so its creator, head writer and co-executive producer, Matt Williams, thought. He even put the title on the cover of the pilot script. "I wanted to establish it as an ensemble piece," he recalls. So when the star, Roseanne Barr, insisted that the sitcom should be named for her, Williams balked.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
A good sitcom is funny; a great one earns your respect and attention even when it's not funny. For years, ABC's "Roseanne" cut it in both categories. At the very least, it tops all of TV's distinctively blue-collar comedies. Even that NBC antique, "The Life of Riley," where William Bendix's lunch pail became an extension of his arm in the 1950s? Get real. Even Fox's outgoing "Married . . . With Children"? Are you kidding? The Bundys wouldn't know a plant whistle from a screaming teapot.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fresh-faced Roseanne Arnold beams at readers in a full-page TV Guide ad this week touting a "very special must-see episode" of her high-rated "Roseanne" in its regular 9 p.m. slot tonight. But what viewers will see tonight in the "must see" episode was still unclear Monday at ABC, where the installment has been the source of bitter finger-pointing and heated words for several weeks between network executives and the show's executive producers, Roseanne and Tom Arnold.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1997 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It apparently is the end of the road for "Roseanne" after all. Although the Carsey-Werner Co., which produces the series, did discuss bringing back some version of it with ABC, the proposal fell apart over money and is dead, according to Jeff Wald, Roseanne's manager. "As of today, it is done and over. But anything can happen," Wald said. "There is no such thing as 100% in show business. Some network could pick up the phone on Monday and make us an offer we can't refuse."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON
The star and namesake of ABC's hit "Roseanne" is expected to return next season despite reports that her split from husband Tom Arnold, who is the show's executive producer, may impact her involvement with the comedy. The actress, who recently dropped her married name, said in court papers filed in her divorce action that she wasn't sure she would return to the show because of a contractual dispute with the Carsey-Werner Co., which produces the sitcom.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Agents Seek Dismissal of Roseanne's Complaint: Los Angeles-based Triad Artists Inc. asked the California Labor Commission, which regulates talent agencies, to reject an Oct. 16 petition by comedian Roseanne Barr Arnold to have Triad's license revoked. Arnold accused Triad, her former agency, of cheating her by secretly cutting a deal for a share of the profits from her hit TV series "Roseanne." Triad denies any wrongdoing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1993 | RICK DU BROW
What price "Roseanne"? Rarely has a feud between a network and star raised more basic questions of show business relationships than the face-off between ABC and Roseanne Arnold, TV's highest-rated weekly entertainer. The best dramas on television this season have involved the shootouts between top performers and their networks. First, David Letterman decided to take a hike from NBC after he didn't get "The Tonight Show" and signed with CBS.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Roseanne is a Roseanne is a Roseanne. The divorce action is proceeding. The estranged husband and business partner is on to other things. And "Roseanne," starring Roseanne, is back on track for its seventh season. Producers say the show remains very much the same--only different.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
A good sitcom is funny; a great one earns your respect and attention even when it's not funny. For years, ABC's "Roseanne" cut it in both categories. At the very least, it tops all of TV's distinctively blue-collar comedies. Even that NBC antique, "The Life of Riley," where William Bendix's lunch pail became an extension of his arm in the 1950s? Get real. Even Fox's outgoing "Married . . . With Children"? Are you kidding? The Bundys wouldn't know a plant whistle from a screaming teapot.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1989 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
The couch and chairs are straight out of a Sears catalogue. The kitchen was modeled after an Indiana grandmother's. And husband Dan Conner's shirts all were sandpapered to show where his ubiquitous pencil-in-the-breastpocket would wear them out. "The details are what make this show," explains Matt Williams, who until his ouster Jan. 6 was the executive producer, creator and chief writer of "Roseanne." Let's face it.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1996 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After almost a decade of financial desperation, breakups, heartaches and tearful smiles, everything finally seems to be coming up roses for Roseanne Conner and her struggling family. The blue-collar clan from ABC's hit comedy "Roseanne" has won $108 million in the lottery and has dived headlong into the lifestyles of the rich and not-so-famous.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1995 | DANIEL HOWARD CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roseanne has always given people something to talk about--most recently, her divorce from Tom Arnold, her Valentine's Day marriage to burly young bodyguard Ben Thomas and her artificial insemination. But there's one thing people haven't been talking much about these days: her TV show. Roseanne languished in bed much of this year with complications from in-vitro fertilization, reducing her presence--both on screen and behind the scenes--to a minimum.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Roseanne is a Roseanne is a Roseanne. The divorce action is proceeding. The estranged husband and business partner is on to other things. And "Roseanne," starring Roseanne, is back on track for its seventh season. Producers say the show remains very much the same--only different.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON
The star and namesake of ABC's hit "Roseanne" is expected to return next season despite reports that her split from husband Tom Arnold, who is the show's executive producer, may impact her involvement with the comedy. The actress, who recently dropped her married name, said in court papers filed in her divorce action that she wasn't sure she would return to the show because of a contractual dispute with the Carsey-Werner Co., which produces the sitcom.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1994 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
"We're dumbfounded," says Tom Werner, co-partner of the company that produces ABC's "Roseanne." Werner is responding to Thursday's Emmy Award nominations, in which "Roseanne" was shut out again in the category of best comedy series. In its six seasons of huge popular success--and despite such accolades as a Peabody Award, widely regarded as broadcasting's highest honor--"Roseanne" has never been nominated for a best comedy series Emmy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fresh-faced Roseanne Arnold beams at readers in a full-page TV Guide ad this week touting a "very special must-see episode" of her high-rated "Roseanne" in its regular 9 p.m. slot tonight. But what viewers will see tonight in the "must see" episode was still unclear Monday at ABC, where the installment has been the source of bitter finger-pointing and heated words for several weeks between network executives and the show's executive producers, Roseanne and Tom Arnold.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1997 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It apparently is the end of the road for "Roseanne" after all. Although the Carsey-Werner Co., which produces the series, did discuss bringing back some version of it with ABC, the proposal fell apart over money and is dead, according to Jeff Wald, Roseanne's manager. "As of today, it is done and over. But anything can happen," Wald said. "There is no such thing as 100% in show business. Some network could pick up the phone on Monday and make us an offer we can't refuse."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1991 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
CBS easily swept to its second weekly ratings victory of the new prime-time season, led by "Murphy Brown," while NBC's longtime comedy base anchored by "The Cosby Show" and "The Golden Girls" showed signs of weakening. With "Cosby" slipping to 17th place and "The Golden Girls" nose-diving to 55th in its new 8 p.m. time slot, NBC finished in the basement last week among the Big Three networks, according to figures released Tuesday by the A. C. Nielsen Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1993 | MONICA YANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would have been a typical television handling of events: Teen star leaves successful series for college, teen's character leaves TV home for art school, loyal audience bids the character farewell, cast moves on with the business of entertaining. But the series is the top-rated "Roseanne," which will not handle the turn of events in typical TV fashion when the show returns Sept. 14. The teen is Darlene Conner, the sassiest daughter in America's first television family.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1993 | RICK DU BROW
What price "Roseanne"? Rarely has a feud between a network and star raised more basic questions of show business relationships than the face-off between ABC and Roseanne Arnold, TV's highest-rated weekly entertainer. The best dramas on television this season have involved the shootouts between top performers and their networks. First, David Letterman decided to take a hike from NBC after he didn't get "The Tonight Show" and signed with CBS.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|