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Rosellen Brown

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October 9, 1994
I can't say I didn't cry for a week, publicly, privately, cry such tears I thought the mulch would turn to mud around my flowers' ankles. He didn't want to do it to me. He didn't deserve to suffer my anger, and I didn't want to kill him with it. But I told him he could shoot me with less pain. I saw my mother go into the ground without me. My son's unborn children will hide when they see me coming. I'll forget the names of my first friends.
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BOOKS
May 28, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
LAURA By Larry Watson; Pocket Books: 326 pp., $24.95 Larry Watson is a great describer of the longings of men--for love, freedom, a place in history. Previous books, such as "Montana 1948," "White Crosses" and "Justice," are always listed among the best of the West. But "Laura" is a supremely Eastern novel, set in suburbia, in New England, in academia, in the middle class.
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September 3, 1992 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
A fortunate family, the Reisers. Carolyn is a successful and devoted pediatrician in the bucolic New Hampshire town to which they have moved. They have added neat modernizing touches to their old farmhouse. Ben makes sculptures out of "found objects"; he is fulfilled, although he doesn't make much money. On the other hand, he makes gourmet meals and is an eager if compulsive househusband. They have two bright teen-agers, even if Jacob seems a bit absent, and Judith, his younger sister, is moody.
BOOKS
October 9, 1994
I can't say I didn't cry for a week, publicly, privately, cry such tears I thought the mulch would turn to mud around my flowers' ankles. He didn't want to do it to me. He didn't deserve to suffer my anger, and I didn't want to kill him with it. But I told him he could shoot me with less pain. I saw my mother go into the ground without me. My son's unborn children will hide when they see me coming. I'll forget the names of my first friends.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She lives down a quiet dirt lane and writes in a room that overlooks a million trees--and not a single house. The tranquillity here is almost overpowering. So, too, is the rock-solid stability that permeates this village in Southern New Hampshire where Rosellen Brown and her husband spend their summers. And yet every morning Brown, 53, awakens with trepidation, with nightmares that dare to dance into daylight.
BOOKS
May 28, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
LAURA By Larry Watson; Pocket Books: 326 pp., $24.95 Larry Watson is a great describer of the longings of men--for love, freedom, a place in history. Previous books, such as "Montana 1948," "White Crosses" and "Justice," are always listed among the best of the West. But "Laura" is a supremely Eastern novel, set in suburbia, in New England, in academia, in the middle class.
BOOKS
January 1, 1995 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
WOMEN ON HUNTING edited and with an introduction by Pam Houston. (Ecco: $23.; 288 pp.) Pam Houston, author of "Cowboys Are My Weakness," paraphrases Lacan in her introduction to this collection: "men desire the object of their desire, while women desire the condition of desiring, and this gives women a greater capacity for relishing the hunt." "Good hunting," writes Houston, is no more about killing an animal than good sex is about making babies or good writing is about publication."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1996 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
You don't need to be an artist or have taken a course in art appreciation to get the symbolism of the landscape sculpture that appears throughout Barbet Schroeder's over-earnest "Before and After." It is a crooked monolith, a huge, bulky, angular, rigid structure that, far from complementing its bucolic setting in the Berkshires, stands out in stark contrast against it.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1992 | Andy Marx
What's next for Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme and screenwriter Ted Tally? It probably won't be a "Silence of the Lambs" sequel, because of complicated rights problems. According to several insiders, there's a good possibility the two will re-team on ex-cop Nancy Taylor Rosenberg's soon-to-be-published first novel, "Mitigating Circumstances," a police thriller recently optioned by TriStar. "It's definitely a thought of ours," said TriStar President Marc Platt, adding.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1996 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Angela. In this debut by writer-director Rebecca Miller (daughter of Arthur), religious mysteries become two young sisters' key to the emotional life of their erratic mother. (Tree Farm) Angels & Insects. Entomologist Mark Rylance is plunged into a web of secrets when he returns to England from his research in South America and marries Patsy Kensit. (Samuel Goldwyn Co.) Anne Frank Remembered.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She lives down a quiet dirt lane and writes in a room that overlooks a million trees--and not a single house. The tranquillity here is almost overpowering. So, too, is the rock-solid stability that permeates this village in Southern New Hampshire where Rosellen Brown and her husband spend their summers. And yet every morning Brown, 53, awakens with trepidation, with nightmares that dare to dance into daylight.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
A fortunate family, the Reisers. Carolyn is a successful and devoted pediatrician in the bucolic New Hampshire town to which they have moved. They have added neat modernizing touches to their old farmhouse. Ben makes sculptures out of "found objects"; he is fulfilled, although he doesn't make much money. On the other hand, he makes gourmet meals and is an eager if compulsive househusband. They have two bright teen-agers, even if Jacob seems a bit absent, and Judith, his younger sister, is moody.
BOOKS
August 25, 1996 | Valerie Cornell, Writer Valerie Cornell lives in New York, where she is completing a novel
Kathleen Cambor's first novel, "The Book of Mercy," is about Edmund Mueller, an aging Pittsburgh fireman who becomes dangerously obsessed with alchemy, that medieval science whose goal was to change base metals into gold and discover the elixir of eternal youth. The book is also about Edmund's disastrous marriage to a flamboyantly manic-depressive woman named Fanny who, after the birth of two children, takes to the road and returns periodically only to confuse and disappoint her injured family.
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