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Roselyne Bosch

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1992 | JACK MATHEWS, Jack Mathews is the film critic for Newsday
On a vacant stretch of black sand beach, on the western coast of Costa Rica, a small film crew has its camera set up just a few feet from the receding surf and aimed steadily at the horizon, above which hangs a preposterously orange sun.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1992 | IAN BOWATER, Bowater, a screenwriter, was formerly director of creative affairs at Odyssey Distributors, which handled the foreign distribution of "1492." and
Times film critic Kenneth Turan is right to extol the visual splendor of director Ridley Scott's "1492: Conquest of Paradise" ("New World Disorder," Calendar, Oct. 9). His opinion that the film is dramatically inert is also valid. He's wrong, however, in laying the blame at the door of the credited screenwriter, Roselyne Bosch.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1992 | IAN BOWATER, Bowater, a screenwriter, was formerly director of creative affairs at Odyssey Distributors, which handled the foreign distribution of "1492." and
Times film critic Kenneth Turan is right to extol the visual splendor of director Ridley Scott's "1492: Conquest of Paradise" ("New World Disorder," Calendar, Oct. 9). His opinion that the film is dramatically inert is also valid. He's wrong, however, in laying the blame at the door of the credited screenwriter, Roselyne Bosch.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1992 | JACK MATHEWS, Jack Mathews is the film critic for Newsday
On a vacant stretch of black sand beach, on the western coast of Costa Rica, a small film crew has its camera set up just a few feet from the receding surf and aimed steadily at the horizon, above which hangs a preposterously orange sun.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1990 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
Is there room on the Atlantic Ocean--and on the big screen--for two Christopher Columbuses? There was room last week in the trade papers for splashy multi-page ads touting two such projects, both to be released in 1992 to capitalize on the 500th anniversary of the Italian explorer's voyage to North America in the service of Spain. Producers Alexander and Ilya Salkind are working with a script by Mario Puzo, "Christopher Columbus: The Movie," with plans to begin shooting in April.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1998
Re "Liberty, Equality . . . Privacy," letter by Roselyne Bosch, Commentary, Feb. 2: It has often been said that Europeans are incredulous at the fixation of Americans on this type of scandal. What does it matter if the president has extramarital affairs as long as he is running the country well and everyone is making money? It may be a peculiarity of America's need for hero worship or perhaps our lingering puritanism, but I believe that Americans want (or used to want) a leader who inspires them to reach for a higher purpose.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Christopher Columbus' story is not a happy one. He pioneered a path to an abundant world unknown to Europeans yet ended up with neither riches nor glory. Rather, he died penniless, his continents named after someone else, his reputation in shreds. All he can lay claim to after all these years is a day named after him and the dubious tribute of movies like "1492: Conquest of Paradise."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON and ROBERT W. WELKOS, Greg Braxton and Robert W. Welkos are Times staff writers
The old newsboy adage "Read all about it!" got a new twist in the world of entertainment during 1992. It became "See all about it!" It was the year that fiction in movies and television and the reality of news became so mixed up and intertwined that it was almost impossible to tell where the storytelling ended and the fact-telling began.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1992 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten, a frequent contributor to Calendar, is based in London.
The stage doors open and the crowd surges forward, pressing with a sudden burst of crazy fury against two black limousines parked directly outside. A couple of security men emerge into the late afternoon sunlight, look startled at the fervor of the people straining forward, then stand aside from the entrance. Next to appear is American actor Robert Duvall, who looks briefly stunned as flashbulbs pop and fans surge toward him.
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