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Rosemarie Avila

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1999
Re "Health Care Van's on a Roll," June 21: I'm stunned at the convoluted thinking of Santa Ana Unified School District trustee Rosemarie Avila. Healthy Tomorrows brings health care into the community to help poor children receive medical care. Avila's main concern seems to be that this effort hides a sinister plot to provide family planning education. BOBBIE CORBETT San Clemente
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1999
Re "Health Care Van's on a Roll," June 21: I'm stunned at the convoluted thinking of Santa Ana Unified School District trustee Rosemarie Avila. Healthy Tomorrows brings health care into the community to help poor children receive medical care. Avila's main concern seems to be that this effort hides a sinister plot to provide family planning education. BOBBIE CORBETT San Clemente
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1995
The Times article ("2 Trustees Push Their Causes With Little Effect," Aug. 7) caught my attention because Santa Ana public schools are not a source of great pride to the city. Because the school board has to take partial responsibility for that, I was interested in learning more about their thinking. Apparently, trustees Tom Chaffee and Rosemarie Avila have a different vision of what needs to be done to correct problems than do the other three trustees, Supt. Al Mijares and PTA President Kathi Jo Brunning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1999
In his divisive diatribe against all things American, Agustin Gurza once again slams the voters of California, this time for their support of Proposition 227 (column, March 9). Despite the initiative's backing from such prominent Hispanics as Rosemarie Avila and Jaime Escalante, Gurza, like so many militant activists, continues to deliberately misrepresent it as an attempt to "eradicate Latino culture and language from the state's institutions." That the state has no business preserving the culture of any group should not even be an issue: That is the domain of churches, organizations and the home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1999
In his divisive diatribe against all things American, Agustin Gurza once again slams the voters of California, this time for their support of Proposition 227 (column, March 9). Despite the initiative's backing from such prominent Hispanics as Rosemarie Avila and Jaime Escalante, Gurza, like so many militant activists, continues to deliberately misrepresent it as an attempt to "eradicate Latino culture and language from the state's institutions." That the state has no business preserving the culture of any group should not even be an issue: That is the domain of churches, organizations and the home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1998
Proposition 227, the "English for the Children" initiative, isn't really about "bilingual education" versus "English only." That's political rhetoric. Bilingual education seldom produces truly bilingual, bi-literate students. And no one wants the children to speak only English. As a parent, I want my five children to know English well and to learn other languages. Our schools should be doing just that. The issue is what works for our students. A Santa Ana Unified School District bilingual study in 1987 pointed out that over 84% of the students in these programs were two or more years behind, and that it was unlikely that they would ever catch up. Despair sets in: "I will never catch up."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1995 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
School board trustees Tom Chaffee and Rosemarie Avila want to teach children American values, reform bilingual education and keep the federal government off their backs. Wish them luck. While the two conservatives may be in lock-step with the nation's conservative political tide, they are the so-called minority members of the Santa Ana Unified School District Board of Education, and often are viewed by colleagues, school officials and residents as the school board rebels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1996
Talk about needs for social services and health care, Santa Ana certainly has them. So why shouldn't the public schools get into the health-care business? It's only practical; the kids are there, the schools are conveniently located. Many parents don't drive. And certainly it would take a load off the teachers who work so hard, often against great odds. The answer is no way. It isn't the American way. Through Medi-Cal funding, now managed by the county's newly created CALOPTIMA system, our schools are being placed in HMOs, which are regulated and monitored by federal guidelines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1994
I must respond to Keith Breon's letter to the editor (April 3), since he has used his contract with the Santa Ana school district as legal counsel as basis for his letter. Breon is not representing my views or beliefs in any way pertaining to the issues he presented, nor did he get prior approval from the Board of Education to debate the issue in the newspaper. Breon rightfully points to appraisals or communications related to negotiations for the sale or purchase of property as proper closed-session agenda items.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1988
Your Sunday editorial (July 31, "Need for Sex Classes Shows in Birthrate") concerning the Santa Ana school board's vote to accept the AIDS/sex education guidelines gave two misleading facts: The editorial gave your readers the false impression that those who opposed the sex education guidelines also opposed sex education. The 10 people who addressed the school board and the over 1,000 residents that signed petitions wanted sex education. They just wanted the right kind that teaches young people to postpone sex until marriage to avoid AIDS, venereal disease, teen-age pregnancy and other mental and emotional hardships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1998
Proposition 227, the "English for the Children" initiative, isn't really about "bilingual education" versus "English only." That's political rhetoric. Bilingual education seldom produces truly bilingual, bi-literate students. And no one wants the children to speak only English. As a parent, I want my five children to know English well and to learn other languages. Our schools should be doing just that. The issue is what works for our students. A Santa Ana Unified School District bilingual study in 1987 pointed out that over 84% of the students in these programs were two or more years behind, and that it was unlikely that they would ever catch up. Despair sets in: "I will never catch up."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1996
Talk about needs for social services and health care, Santa Ana certainly has them. So why shouldn't the public schools get into the health-care business? It's only practical; the kids are there, the schools are conveniently located. Many parents don't drive. And certainly it would take a load off the teachers who work so hard, often against great odds. The answer is no way. It isn't the American way. Through Medi-Cal funding, now managed by the county's newly created CALOPTIMA system, our schools are being placed in HMOs, which are regulated and monitored by federal guidelines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1995
The Times article ("2 Trustees Push Their Causes With Little Effect," Aug. 7) caught my attention because Santa Ana public schools are not a source of great pride to the city. Because the school board has to take partial responsibility for that, I was interested in learning more about their thinking. Apparently, trustees Tom Chaffee and Rosemarie Avila have a different vision of what needs to be done to correct problems than do the other three trustees, Supt. Al Mijares and PTA President Kathi Jo Brunning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1995 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
School board trustees Tom Chaffee and Rosemarie Avila want to teach children American values, reform bilingual education and keep the federal government off their backs. Wish them luck. While the two conservatives may be in lock-step with the nation's conservative political tide, they are the so-called minority members of the Santa Ana Unified School District Board of Education, and often are viewed by colleagues, school officials and residents as the school board rebels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1994
I must respond to Keith Breon's letter to the editor (April 3), since he has used his contract with the Santa Ana school district as legal counsel as basis for his letter. Breon is not representing my views or beliefs in any way pertaining to the issues he presented, nor did he get prior approval from the Board of Education to debate the issue in the newspaper. Breon rightfully points to appraisals or communications related to negotiations for the sale or purchase of property as proper closed-session agenda items.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1994 | JON NALICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fueling the continuing controversy over two multimillion-dollar land purchases, trustees of the Santa Ana Unified School District on Tuesday censured a board member for allegedly leaking confidential documents related to the deals. "Censure of a board member is a pretty drastic step, but I think there's some serious violations going on here of the board's trust," Trustee Robert W. Balen said before the board voted to censure trustee Rosemarie Avila.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1994 | JON NALICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fueling the continuing controversy over two multimillion-dollar land purchases, trustees of the Santa Ana Unified School District on Tuesday censured a board member for allegedly leaking confidential documents related to the deals. "Censure of a board member is a pretty drastic step, but I think there's some serious violations going on here of the board's trust," Trustee Robert W. Balen said before the board voted to censure trustee Rosemarie Avila.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1994 | JON NALICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The governing board of the Santa Ana Unified School District has selected Audrey Yamagata-Noji to be board president for the next year. At its meeting on Tuesday night, the Board of Education elected Yamagata-Noji on a 3-2 vote. Trustees Robert W. Balen, Sal Mendoza and Yamagata-Noji supported the motion, and trustees Tom Chaffee and Rosemarie Avila opposed it. The board also unanimously named Balen vice president and Chaffee clerk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1988
Your Sunday editorial (July 31, "Need for Sex Classes Shows in Birthrate") concerning the Santa Ana school board's vote to accept the AIDS/sex education guidelines gave two misleading facts: The editorial gave your readers the false impression that those who opposed the sex education guidelines also opposed sex education. The 10 people who addressed the school board and the over 1,000 residents that signed petitions wanted sex education. They just wanted the right kind that teaches young people to postpone sex until marriage to avoid AIDS, venereal disease, teen-age pregnancy and other mental and emotional hardships.
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