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March 22, 1993 | Ted Johnson, Times correspondent
It's the U.S. Post Office, so that means lost letters and slow delivery, right? People like Rosemarie Fernandez, 34, are working hard to try to change that image. As the newly appointed postmaster of Santa Ana, the largest zone in Orange County, Fernandez wants to instill a "customer-is-always-right" approach to service. She is also the city's first female postmaster, testimony to Postmaster General Marvin Runyon's efforts to diversify the institution's management.
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March 22, 1993 | Ted Johnson, Times correspondent
It's the U.S. Post Office, so that means lost letters and slow delivery, right? People like Rosemarie Fernandez, 34, are working hard to try to change that image. As the newly appointed postmaster of Santa Ana, the largest zone in Orange County, Fernandez wants to instill a "customer-is-always-right" approach to service. She is also the city's first female postmaster, testimony to Postmaster General Marvin Runyon's efforts to diversify the institution's management.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
Lining a wall at the Sunflower Avenue post office are the portraits of two dozen or so men who over the past 120 years have served as the city's postmaster. But the wall will soon be graced by a picture of Rosemarie Fernandez, the city's first woman postmaster since the position was created in 1870. Fernandez, 34, assumed the job as manager of the area's 600 postal employees and 11 facilities last week. "I think this is really exciting," Fernandez said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1993 | GEOFF BOUCHER
Raising their hands and repeating the same oath uttered by new U.S. presidents, seven Orange County postmasters were sworn in Wednesday to fill an office that has been held by the likes of Mark Twain, Ben Franklin and Abraham Lincoln. The four men and three women will oversee a combined 1,900 employees who deliver more than 2.13 million pieces of mail each day to more than 307,000 addresses. They are filling posts left vacant by the U.S. Postal Service's recent restructuring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1994 | YVETTE CABRERA
For most people, it's a piece of mail they dread receiving, especially during the holidays. So for the past three years, the Internal Revenue Service has been nice enough to wait until the new year to send out tax forms. The annual mailing flurry, however, began in mid-December when the IRS sent its first bulk of packages to Orange County's post offices as well as to post offices nationwide. It's a mass mailing that the United States Postal Service described as one of its biggest of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1993 | MARTIN MILLER
Margaret Rojas needed a book of stamps to mail invitations to her son's 25th wedding anniversary party. The Santa Ana resident was prepared for the five-block walk to the nearest post office. But Tuesday morning, Rojas, 67, didn't have to go to the post office. It came to her. As part of a new six-month trial program, a mobile postal van--a veritable post office on wheels--parked at the Santa Ana Senior Center and began handling the postal requests of grateful senior citizens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1996 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even the letter carriers say it: An all-postal chorus line is not a pretty sight. Especially in the Houston and Santa Ana postal districts, the top dog bite capitals in the country. Last week, in cities nationwide, letter carriers lined up in front of the media to show their dog bite scars as part as an effort to focus attention on a problem that gets worse in the summer, when kids and pets are milling about more than usual. And, as part of Dog Bite Prevention Week, the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1996 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city's zoo, already home to exotic animals such as the thick-billed parrot and white-handed gibbon monkey, will be joined today by 15 endangered species--at least on paper. The animals will appear on 15 commemorative stamps, part of a nationwide unveiling by the U.S. Postal Service to help raise awareness of endangered species. The unveiling coincides with National Stamp Collecting Month. One endangered species stamp shows a close-up of the California condor's leathery, bald head.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1995 | PHUONG NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven David went to the post office Thursday morning to buy stamps--10,000 of them. David, like thousands of people across the country, got in line for the $6.40 sets of Marilyn Monroe collectibles--20 identical images of the glamorous movie star in a spangled sleeveless gown. In honor of what would have been her 69th birthday, the U.S. Postal Service on Thursday released 400 million copies of its first in a series of "Legends of Hollywood" stamps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1995 | SARAH KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They will go through sleet and rain to deliver the mail, but, frankly, U.S. postal employees are getting tired of being chased, bitten and frightened by dogs. Perfectly normal dogs, says Santa Ana Postmaster Rosemarie Fernandez, are taking bites of letter carriers' legs and arms at an alarming rate. Already this year, 76 carriers have been bitten in Orange County, more than all of last year.
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