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Rosemarie Troy

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March 2, 1990 | CYNDI Y. NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troy may be the newest luxury fashion boutique in the desert, but it has its roots in Los Angeles, because the brains behind the beauty of the store belong to Rosemarie Troy, who was the merchandising director for Bullocks Wilshire before she set up her own shop. "It was time to move on," is all she says about her unexpected departure from Los Angeles.
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NEWS
March 2, 1990 | CYNDI Y. NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troy may be the newest luxury fashion boutique in the desert, but it has its roots in Los Angeles, because the brains behind the beauty of the store belong to Rosemarie Troy, who was the merchandising director for Bullocks Wilshire before she set up her own shop. "It was time to move on," is all she says about her unexpected departure from Los Angeles.
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NEWS
January 15, 1988 | MARY ROURKE, Times Staff Writer
The basics have taken on a daring look for 1988 . . . it's almost as if mainstream fashion suddenly got hip. For men, mainstream items include bomber-style jackets, white shirts without buttons on the collar and navy blue blazers cut closer to the body. "We're getting away from the boxy look," Martin Fischer, vice president of Saks Fifth Avenue, says.
NEWS
November 14, 1986 | DIANE REISCHEL, Times Staff Writer
Designer Carole Little spent weeks up to her neck in metallic yarns and silk Charmeuse. She designed two dressy collections for the holiday season. But if you spot her next month at a Christmas party, she'll likely be wearing old jeans and a bronze lame blouse. Not the usual holiday glitz. But in Los Angeles, where the weather alone can destroy a traditionalist's view of the holidays, yuletide dressing can mean anything from a leather jump suit to a five-figure Galanos gown.
NEWS
September 12, 1986 | DIANE REISCHEL, Times Staff Writer
The women who shop Torie Steele's Valentino boutique were ripping plastic garment bags to shreds. They trampled tissue to grab newly arrived $2,000 suits. But rather than officiate this chaos, store buyer Tom Bruno encouraged it. "It's fun for them to see a mess once in a while," Bruno says. "I'm sure they've never seen a mess like that in their own homes." Bruno knows that selling fashion to the very rich of L.A. requires skills bordering on a diplomat's.
NEWS
February 15, 1985 | Jody Jacobs
Stars of the big and little screens will help the Westlake School for Girls celebrate two big dates at a gala party Feb. 23 at the Century Plaza Hotel. The big numbers are Westlake's 80th anniversary and headmaster Nathan O. Reynolds' 20 years at his post. Both deserve big hoorays. And that's just what Bob Newhart, Jimmy and Gloria Stewart, Aaron and Candy Spelling, Harriet Nelson and her granddaughter, Tracy Nelson, and the Hal Holbrooks will be shouting about that evening.
NEWS
March 18, 1988 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, Times Fashion Editor
Christian Lacroix aimed for greater glory Wednesday night as he showed his first collection of ready-to-wear clothing, which will sell at 130 stores around the world with price tags ranging from about $800 to $2,500 at U.S. outlets. The big question before the show was whether Lacroix, widely credited with starting the current short-skirt trend in his custom line, would be able to translate his ornate curves and brilliant colors into mass-produced outfits at more affordable prices.
NEWS
July 25, 1986 | ROSE-MARIE TURK
This fall, the most tempting items on a woman's shopping list could turn out to be the accessories-- not the clothes. With designers showing garments analogous to nouvelle cuisine entrees (elegant, understated and spare), accessories have a way of looking like rich desserts. Yet these trimmings know their place.
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | ROSE-MARIE TURK
Steve Reiss' grandmother has a habit of sending him pages torn from slick fashion magazines and supermarket tabloids. The subject is always the same: men and women dressed to the hilt in leather. For Reiss, marketing manager of the trade publication Leather Today, the clippings are just one more indication of the recent coming of age in America of leather. Once associated with men on motorcycles, it's now equated with cashmere.
NEWS
August 23, 1985 | Jody Jacobs
It's a little overdue, this "Welcome Home" party for former Atty. Gen. William French Smith and his wife Jean who left Washington late in February to settle back home in Pasadena. Bill Smith eased himself into his old office at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher. Jean resumed her local charitable affairs (and gave up just a few of her Washington commitments). And together they've slipped easily into the social rounds they were part of before he became President Reagan's attorney general.
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