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Rosemary Brandenburg

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1990 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Welcome Home, Roxy Carmichael" (citywide) isn't truly terrible, it's truly confused. It's as though director Jim Abrahams wanted to do heartfelt comedy-drama but couldn't quite shake off the wicked edge of his alma mater, ZAZ: Zucker-Abrahams-Zucker, the dementos behind "Airplane!" and "The Naked Gun."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The sci-fi thriller "The Island," which opens today, is sort of a stepchild of "THX 1138" and "Logan's Run" with even a bit of "Coma" thrown in for good measure. But what isn't derivative are the impressive sets -- think on the scale of those in Fritz Lang's silent classic "Metropolis" -- which draw viewers into this thriller set in the not so distant future.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Small Soldiers" is a little boy's fantasy of toys come to life. And like small boys it is often charming and funny, occasionally malicious, and finally too focused on gizmos and effects for its own good. What if, wonders Gil Mars (Denis Leary), the rapacious CEO of Globotech Industries, toys were so smart that when you played with them they played back? What if they could do in real life everything they do in commercials? Wouldn't that be great for business?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"The Peacemaker" is one of those "what was that all about?" movies, where events rush by so fast you're convinced you must have seen something but you're not sure exactly what. Quick assassinations, coldblooded double-crosses, train wrecks, car chases through crowded streets of European capitals, the fate of civilization as we know it--they've all been shoe-horned into the much-anticipated first film from DreamWorks, Hollywood's newest studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2001 | DIANNE BATES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At first, creating ape food for the current "Planet of the Apes" seemed like an easy job for food stylist Jack White. Bananas and coconuts, right? Wrong. There would be no typical simian foodstuffs on this movie's menu. Apparently he hadn't seen "Escape From Planet of the Apes" (1971), in which Kim Hunter' s Dr. Zira claims to "loathe bananas." Set decorator Rosemary Brandenburg felt the same way about the new film's food.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
The closing credits for "The Rock" include a dedication "in loving memory to Don Simpson," but this last film from the late producer and his partner Jerry Bruckheimer so perfectly encapsulates everything the pair have stood for that the actual words are superfluous.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1991 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
D. Richter did not exactly set the world on fire with "The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai," his memorably wacky 1984 directorial debut, but he did manage to light a torch that a ragtag but resilient group of followers have been carrying ever since. Any day now, they said comfortingly to each other as year followed Richter-less year, he'll direct another film, and won't that be fun?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
What happens in Disney's uproarious "The Haunted Mansion" is more creepy than scary, but it's lots of fun, which is the point, as it was with this year's other film based on a theme park ride, "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl." This is a fright show artfully designed for the whole family, a comedy that all but the most impressionable children will likely get a kick out of.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1995 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Casper the Friendly Ghost is awfully friendly in "Casper" and more's the pity. He's so adorable that he might as well be the Pillsbury Dough Boy, with whom he shares more than a passing resemblance here. The problem with Casper has always been his goodness. It's much easier--and more fun--to get behind a cartoon villain. (Dramatically speaking, this applies to humans, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1989 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES FILM CRITIC
In "Blaze"(throughout San Diego County), the raucous and selectively true story of the love affair of Earl K. Long, the 63-year-old governor of Louisiana, and red-haired, 28-year-old burlesque queen Blaze Starr, Paul Newman throws himself into bringing every eccentric, disrespectful quirk of Ol' Earl's to life and he succeeds fiercely well.
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