Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRosemary Harris
IN THE NEWS

Rosemary Harris

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
SAN DIEGO -- Rosemary Harris, the British-born, American-based actress whom younger moviegoers will know as Aunt May in the "Spider-Man" franchise, is one of those canny veterans who could mesmerize an audience while reading the proverbial phone book. She has more poignant material in the Old Globe's production of "Oscar and the Pink Lady," a solo performance piece that's been adapted from a novella by French writer Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
SAN DIEGO -- Rosemary Harris, the British-born, American-based actress whom younger moviegoers will know as Aunt May in the "Spider-Man" franchise, is one of those canny veterans who could mesmerize an audience while reading the proverbial phone book. She has more poignant material in the Old Globe's production of "Oscar and the Pink Lady," a solo performance piece that's been adapted from a novella by French writer Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2007 | Patrick Pacheco, Special to The Times
SAN DIEGO -- "I had an anxiety dream the other night," says actress Rosemary Harris, just before the first preview of "Oscar and the Pink Lady." "I was in the middle of a performance and then all the characters in the play suddenly began coming out from the wings, handing me pieces of paper. And I said to them, 'Sorry, but I don't think you belong here. You know, this isn't helpful.' But they kept coming nonetheless."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2007 | Patrick Pacheco, Special to The Times
SAN DIEGO -- "I had an anxiety dream the other night," says actress Rosemary Harris, just before the first preview of "Oscar and the Pink Lady." "I was in the middle of a performance and then all the characters in the play suddenly began coming out from the wings, handing me pieces of paper. And I said to them, 'Sorry, but I don't think you belong here. You know, this isn't helpful.' But they kept coming nonetheless."
NEWS
October 2, 2007
'Oscar and the Pink Lady': The reservation number for the San Diego production of "Oscar and the Pink Lady," Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt's one-woman play starring Rosemary Harris at the Old Globe Theatre's Cassius Carter Centre Stage in Balboa Park, is (619) 234-5623. An incorrect number ran in a feature about Harris in Friday's Calendar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
T. Edward Hambleton, 94, a co-founder of off-Broadway's influential Phoenix Theater, died Saturday at a Baltimore hospital of complications from an esophageal tumor, his family said. For three decades, the Phoenix, established in 1953 in a Yiddish theater in the East Village, showcased some of the theater's finest artists, including Jessica Tandy, Hume Cronyn, Uta Hagen, Helen Hayes, Rosemary Harris and John Houseman.
NEWS
December 27, 1988 | United Press International
Noel Willman, an Irish-born actor and director who staged the Tony Award-winning "A Man for All Seasons," suffered a fatal heart attack in a movie theater, friends said Monday. He was 70 years old. Willman, a native of Londonderry, Ireland, died Saturday on the way to a New York hospital, said a friend, Emanuel Gambino. He was recently diagnosed as having a heart ailment and was stricken while watching an afternoon movie at a theater near his home.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
“When one is young, one hears only the word 'great.' When one is less young, one hears only the word 'next.' ”  So says the spiky centrifuge of “The Morini Strad” at the Colony Theatre. In its elegant West Coast premiere, Willy Holtzman's fact-based drama about virtuoso Erica Morini and the instrument she yearns to restore traces a moving reverie on classical mastery, the realities of aging and the cost of artistic ambition. Morini (1904-1995), considered by many observers to be the sine qua non of her profession, was a child prodigy who attacked the violin with a force that hitherto was the domain of male counterparts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1988 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
P.G. Wodehouse, creator of the Honorable Bertie Wooster, the estimable Jeeves and a veritable treasure-trove of other English upper-class eccentrics, comes to PBS tonight with a "Great Performances" presentation of his novella "The Old Reliable." Airing at 9 on Channels 28, 15 and 24, this light, '30s-era frolic begins a new "Great Performances" trilogy of "Tales From the Hollywood Hills," short stories based on the works of famous authors who at one time made Tinseltown their home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2000 | From Associated Press
Alexander Cohen, a Broadway producer for nearly 60 years and the man who brought the Tony Awards to national television, died Saturday of complications from emphysema. He was 79. A colorful, prolific showman who was never shy about voicing his opinions, Cohen was a product of the golden age of Broadway when one man could put on a play or musical. "Angel Street," Cohen's first production, was one of his biggest hits, opening in 1941 and running 1,295 performances.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|