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Rosemary Mariner

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1990 | ADRIANNE GOODMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crediting her success to "simple perseverance," Navy Cmdr. Rosemary (Sabre) Mariner assumed command Thursday of a squadron of jet pilots at Point Mugu Naval Air Station, becoming the first woman in the U.S. armed services to lead an operational air squadron. As an occasional jet boomed overhead, Mariner took over leadership of the squadron from Cmdr. Charles H. Smith in solemn change-of-command ceremonies not far from the tarmac of the air strip.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1990 | ADRIANNE GOODMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crediting her success to "simple perseverance," Navy Cmdr. Rosemary (Sabre) Mariner assumed command Thursday of a squadron of jet pilots at Point Mugu Naval Air Station, becoming the first woman in the U.S. armed services to lead an operational air squadron. As an occasional jet boomed overhead, Mariner took over leadership of the squadron from Cmdr. Charles H. Smith in solemn change-of-command ceremonies not far from the tarmac of the air strip.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cmdr. Rosemary Mariner hails from the "first-or-never" generation of female aviators in the Navy. When the 37-year-old set out to be a pilot, she says, the choice was simple: since the ranks of Navy aviators included no women, she could either be among the first, or never fly at all. She chose to be a pioneer. She was one of the first eight women selected to attend flight school. She was the first woman to fly a tactical jet and to fly a front-line attack plane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cmdr. Rosemary Mariner hails from the "first-or-never" generation of female aviators in the Navy. When the 37-year-old set out to be a pilot, she says, the choice was simple: since the ranks of Navy aviators included no women, she could either be among the first, or never fly at all. She chose to be a pioneer. She was one of the first eight women selected to attend flight school. She was the first woman to fly a tactical jet and to fly a front-line attack plane.
NEWS
June 25, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cmdr. Rosemary Mariner hails from the "first-or-never" generation of female aviators in the Navy. When the 37-year-old set out to be a pilot, she says, the choice was simple: because the ranks of Navy aviators included no women, she could either be among the first, or never fly at all. She chose to be a pioneer. She was one of the first eight women selected to attend flight school. She was the first woman to fly a tactical jet and to fly a front-line attack plane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1990 | ADRIANNE GOODMAN
Officials at Point Mugu Naval Air Station identified two Navy crew members Friday whose attack jet crashed in the Santa Ynez Mountains a day earlier and ignited a brush fire still burning in the rugged terrain northeast of Santa Barbara. Lt. Paul E. Barney 3rd, the pilot of the A-7 Corsair jet, and the jet's navigator, Lt. Cmdr. Steven P. Albert, both parachuted to safety shortly before the plane crashed Thursday afternoon, said Navy spokesman Lt. Gene Okamoto.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1990
The newest addition to the local-woman-makes-good category is San Diegan Rosemary Mariner, who, at 37, is about to become the first female to command a Navy aviation squadron. Cmdr. Mariner's achievement should be an occasion for unreserved congratulations and acknowledgement of another step in the progress of feminism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1988 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
At 35, Cmdr. Rosemary Mariner has spent nearly half her life learning to fly jets, working her way up in the elite society of Navy pilots from whose ranks will emerge future ship captains and admirals. By all reports, her performance has been stellar, her dedication unquestioned. Self-assured and eloquent, she has been selected by top Navy brass to be the commanding officer of a flight squadron, a position never before held by a woman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1991
Date All month Event Art show: five Ventura County artists Place Ventura College Gallery 2 Date All month Event Art show: Jennifer Quint Place Ventura College New Media Gallery Date All month Event Student art show Place Moorpark College Women's Center Date March 13-14 noon Event Video: "How We Got the Vote" Place Moorpark College Women's Center Date March 14 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
June 28, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY and JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Lt. Monica Rivadeneira, one of the Navy's few women pilots, stepped to a microphone at a convention of naval aviators and asked nine male admirals how long it would be until women were permitted to fly combat missions, scores of male fliers took to their feet with a rising tide of hisses, jeers and catcalls. Within hours of that ominous outburst at the 1991 convention of the Tailhook Assn., Lt.
NEWS
June 25, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cmdr. Rosemary Mariner hails from the "first-or-never" generation of female aviators in the Navy. When the 37-year-old set out to be a pilot, she says, the choice was simple: because the ranks of Navy aviators included no women, she could either be among the first, or never fly at all. She chose to be a pioneer. She was one of the first eight women selected to attend flight school. She was the first woman to fly a tactical jet and to fly a front-line attack plane.
NEWS
October 12, 1988 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
At 35, Cmdr. Rosemary Mariner has spent nearly half her life learning to fly jets, working her way up in the elite society of Navy pilots from whose ranks will emerge future ship captains and admirals. By all reports, her performance has been stellar, her dedication unquestioned. Self-assured and eloquent, she has been selected by top Navy brass to be the commanding officer of a flight squadron, a position never before held by a woman.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a series of narrow votes with potentially far-reaching political significance, a presidential commission Tuesday recommended barring women from serving in most combat roles, including flying combat aircraft. The 15-member commission, however, said that the Navy should consider opening its surface combat ships to women, who currently are restricted to just 66 noncombat ships in the 450-ship fleet.
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