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Rosenbaum Ranch

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2005 | SARA LIN, Times Staff Writer
From Interstate 5 in San Juan Capistrano, it's hard to miss Rosenbaum Ranch: Look for the 25-foot-high pile of wood. For more than three decades, Mel Rosenbaum, 81, has tended what's left of his family's historic ranch, which once stretched 700 acres from what is now Camino Capistrano through San Juan Capistrano and Rancho Santa Margarita.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2005 | SARA LIN, Times Staff Writer
From Interstate 5 in San Juan Capistrano, it's hard to miss Rosenbaum Ranch: Look for the 25-foot-high pile of wood. For more than three decades, Mel Rosenbaum, 81, has tended what's left of his family's historic ranch, which once stretched 700 acres from what is now Camino Capistrano through San Juan Capistrano and Rancho Santa Margarita.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1996 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Above the door of the clapboard farmhouse near Trabuco Creek, behind the stacks of firewood of eucalyptus, pine, ash and sycamore, the sign reads "Since 1868, Rosenbaum Ranch." The current proprietor is 72-year-old Mel Rosenbaum, a member of a pioneer family that is among the elite in centuries-old San Juan Capistrano. But the Rosenbaums also share several slices of local history that, even here, are known by few.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1996 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Above the door of the clapboard farmhouse near Trabuco Creek, behind the stacks of firewood of eucalyptus, pine, ash and sycamore, the sign reads "Since 1868, Rosenbaum Ranch." The current proprietor is 72-year-old Mel Rosenbaum, a member of a pioneer family that is among the elite in centuries-old San Juan Capistrano. But the Rosenbaums also share several slices of local history that, even here, are known by few.
REAL ESTATE
September 23, 2007 | Dawn Bonker, Special to The Times
IN the model home dubbed "The Pioneer," a rambling house tucked into a Corona subdivision springing up among the last dairy farms of Riverside County, is a fireplace unlike anything the early settlers ever gathered around on a chilly night. Sleek glass doors front a metal insert that holds ceramic "logs." Built-in gas jets stand ready to send up flickering flames.
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