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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Martha Groves
After hearing the news of U.S. Rep. Henry A. Waxman's decision to retire from Congress, former Los Angeles Councilman Bill Rosendahl picked up the phone and called state Sen. Ted W. Lieu (D-Torrance) to urge him to run for the veteran Westside Democrat's seat. "I've worked with Ted in my eight years in government," Rosendahl said. "He was an incredible partner for the 11th District. " Lieu's district substantially overlaps Waxman's district, which includes much of the Westside and South Bay. Rosendahl lauded Lieu for playing a key role in closing the state's budget deficit and for taking strong positions on gay rights and animal rights and for supporting activists' efforts to shut down the Santa Monica Airport because of pollution, noise and safety concerns.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Martha Groves
After hearing the news of U.S. Rep. Henry A. Waxman's decision to retire from Congress, former Los Angeles Councilman Bill Rosendahl picked up the phone and called state Sen. Ted W. Lieu (D-Torrance) to urge him to run for the veteran Westside Democrat's seat. "I've worked with Ted in my eight years in government," Rosendahl said. "He was an incredible partner for the 11th District. " Lieu's district substantially overlaps Waxman's district, which includes much of the Westside and South Bay. Rosendahl lauded Lieu for playing a key role in closing the state's budget deficit and for taking strong positions on gay rights and animal rights and for supporting activists' efforts to shut down the Santa Monica Airport because of pollution, noise and safety concerns.
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OPINION
June 22, 2013
Re "A colorful life of contrasts," Column One, and "Calabasas wrestles with the Bieber effect," June 20 I found these two front-page stories of interest, but I can't help wondering if The Times actually intended to make a point by featuring these contrasting articles so close to each other. On the one hand, outgoing Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl, having fought and finally accepted his homosexuality and currently battling cancer, lives a seemingly happy life in Mar Vista surrounded by friends and causes, totally disinterested in materialism and the Hollywood lifestyle.
OPINION
June 22, 2013
Re "A colorful life of contrasts," Column One, and "Calabasas wrestles with the Bieber effect," June 20 I found these two front-page stories of interest, but I can't help wondering if The Times actually intended to make a point by featuring these contrasting articles so close to each other. On the one hand, outgoing Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl, having fought and finally accepted his homosexuality and currently battling cancer, lives a seemingly happy life in Mar Vista surrounded by friends and causes, totally disinterested in materialism and the Hollywood lifestyle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Councilman Bill Rosendahl came to City Hall Tuesday to formally announce that he will not seek reelection to a third term as he battles cancer. He burned some political bridges while he was at it. In a wide-ranging council meeting speech, the famously candid politician complained about a variety of public figures who have disappointed him over the years. He disparaged President Obama for continuing to wage a war overseas and complained about two California members of Congress - Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Henry Waxman - who he said haven't done enough to provide housing for homeless veterans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl said Monday that he has decided not to seek reelection in order to focus on his fight with cancer. In a statement he planned to send to constituents early Tuesday, Rosendahl said he was "passing the baton" to let a new elected official represent his Westside district, which stretches along the coast from Westchester to Pacific Palisades. He named his longtime chief of staff, Mike Bonin, as his preferred successor, saying, "With Mike ready to fill my shoes, I can step aside with confidence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2012 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl revealed Wednesday that he has begun receiving treatment for cancer in his pelvic area. Rosendahl, who had missed 10 days of work at City Hall due to severe back pain, said in an email and Twitter post that he learned this week that he has the cancer, which he described as slow-moving. In a message titled "I'm Going to Beat This," he said the cancer is pinching some of his nerves and "causing a lot of pain" but had not reached any vital organs.
OPINION
July 22, 2011 | By The Times editorial board
L.A. City Councilman Bill Rosendahl says he was inspired to introduce a groundbreaking anti-harassment ordinance for bicyclists after attending a meeting at a local bike shop, where he met a young man whose face had been mangled when he was struck by a hit-and-run driver. "It's about time cyclists had rights; about time they had laws to protect them," Rosendahl says in a YouTube video made to promote his plan. Cyclists already have traffic laws to protect them, but Rosendahl's ordinance, which was approved Wednesday by the City Council, gives them a new way to strike back at drivers who physically assault or threaten to assault them, force them off the road, throw objects at them or otherwise cause injury simply because of their status as cyclists.
OPINION
June 22, 2013
Re "Snowden, a fool not a spy," Opinion, June 18 Deciding Edward Snowden 's status as a traitor or hero is pointless - it confuses two different contexts for his actions. Deliberately exposing secret material makes him, like Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, blind to the treasonous nature and possible consequences of his actions. A 29-year-old computer nerd is not qualified to be a self-appointed broker of the international balance of power. If Snowden had issues of conscience, reporting them and resigning was the appropriate response.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2011 | Steve Lopez
Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl once hosted a TV show on the issues of the day, so he's used to being an interrogator. No surprise, then, that he's come up with 38 questions so far on the proposal to build a football stadium in the middle of downtown Los Angeles and fuse it to the Convention Center. Questions such as: "Can anyone name an event or two that needs to have a football stadium connected to a Convention Center in order to make their event work?" "Since taxes on tickets would normally flow into the general fund to help pay for services such as police officers, wouldn't the use of ticket taxes to pay off the bonds be defined as a public subsidy?"
OPINION
June 22, 2013
Re "Snowden, a fool not a spy," Opinion, June 18 Deciding Edward Snowden 's status as a traitor or hero is pointless - it confuses two different contexts for his actions. Deliberately exposing secret material makes him, like Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, blind to the treasonous nature and possible consequences of his actions. A 29-year-old computer nerd is not qualified to be a self-appointed broker of the international balance of power. If Snowden had issues of conscience, reporting them and resigning was the appropriate response.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2013 | By David Zahniser
Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl said Thursday that his cancer is in remission, announcing on his YouTube channel that medical marijuana played a critical role in his survival. Rosendahl, who steps down June 30 after eight years in office, released a video saying he went through “five months of hell” and had been told initially he would not live past last November's election. Doctors diagnosed Rosendahl with Stage 4 cancer of the ureter in his pelvic area last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2013 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Bill Rosendahl lifts his walker over the threshold and carries it into the grow room before anyone in his entourage - press secretary, pot shop owner, pot consultant and bud tender - can rush over to help. Even after 13 hits of radiation and seven rounds of combination chemo, Rosendahl moves steadily, straight as a poplar, past 2-foot-high cannabis plants labeled Hindu Skunk and Humboldt O.G. And, he says, Herbalcure, the Westside pot dispensary we're touring, is responsible for his vigor.
OPINION
March 6, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Robert Kennedy was a young Bill Rosendahl's hope for the White House, but Kennedy's rival, Hubert Humphrey, practiced the "happy warrior" style of politics that represents the principles Rosendahl has embraced. As he leaves the Los Angeles City Council after two terms, his eight years in office (and a diagnosis of cancer, now in remission) have not extinguished Rosendahl's cheerfulness, but they have given his warrior side an instruction booklet. He's crusaded for gay rights, for better care for the homeless and his fellow veterans, for mass transit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2013 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
When Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl decided in October to retire and focus on battling cancer, he anointed Mike Bonin, his longtime chief of staff, as his preferred successor. The March 5 primary election now seems Bonin's to lose. Of four candidates seeking to represent Council District 11 - which includes Brentwood, Mar Vista, Venice and Westchester - Bonin has raised the most money ($380,000, including matching funds, more than four times the amount amassed by his nearest rival)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2013 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
Bone-chilling fog swirled along Venice Beach one recent afternoon when Robert and Nani Valencia and Ana Maria Reyes stopped by the long, metal storage container beside the sand. After they showed IDs and claim checks, a volunteer wheeled out two blue recycling bins in which the three recent arrivals from Texas had stashed their suitcases. They pulled out toiletries, sweaters and blankets and stuffed them into reusable grocery bags. "It makes us feel a lot better to store our things here," said Nani Valencia, 37. "When you have all your [suitcases]
OPINION
February 17, 2005
Having closely followed the three candidates for the 11th Los Angeles City Council District, I have to wonder if the authors of "A Voice for the Westside" (editorial, Feb. 15) were speaking about the same Bill Rosendahl that I met. To say that he is bombastic, divisive and ill informed is a complete distortion of the facts. Rosendahl speaks in a language that is plain and easily understood, bringing Democrats, Republicans, independents and other parties together to address the urgent issues and challenges now facing Los Angeles.
OPINION
March 6, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Robert Kennedy was a young Bill Rosendahl's hope for the White House, but Kennedy's rival, Hubert Humphrey, practiced the "happy warrior" style of politics that represents the principles Rosendahl has embraced. As he leaves the Los Angeles City Council after two terms, his eight years in office (and a diagnosis of cancer, now in remission) have not extinguished Rosendahl's cheerfulness, but they have given his warrior side an instruction booklet. He's crusaded for gay rights, for better care for the homeless and his fellow veterans, for mass transit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2013 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Two City Council members on Wednesday demanded to know why the city's airport commission approved almost $4 million in contracts for a public relations campaign to highlight the ongoing modernization of Los Angeles International Airport. Dennis Zine, a candidate for city controller, and Bill Rosendahl, whose district includes LAX, called for a council review of the three contracts, which were awarded without discussion by the Board of Airport Commissioners last week to companies that are not based in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Councilman Bill Rosendahl came to City Hall Tuesday to formally announce that he will not seek reelection to a third term as he battles cancer. He burned some political bridges while he was at it. In a wide-ranging council meeting speech, the famously candid politician complained about a variety of public figures who have disappointed him over the years. He disparaged President Obama for continuing to wage a war overseas and complained about two California members of Congress - Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Henry Waxman - who he said haven't done enough to provide housing for homeless veterans.
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