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Rosenfield

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OPINION
April 16, 1989
Naivete at times can be charming, but when used maliciously by a sophisticated lawyer in the furtherance of his questionable aims, it is reprehensible. Rosenfield compares auto insurance (where, according to him, a third of every premium dollar goes to overhead, salaries, and profits) with public utilities (which spend only 5 cents on administration). Public utilities don't have any expenses to acquire new customers; since they are monopolies in their service areas, we must come to them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 22, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
In the 2 1/2 years since selling California Pizza Kitchen, the popular chain he helped found in 1985, Richard L. Rosenfield has been golfing, fishing, hunting, pursuing hobbies and otherwise staying off the restaurant industry's radar. Not so much for Larry S. Flax, Rosenfield's best friend and business partner of four decades, who's been jetting around the world hunting for a new food project. Turns out he didn't have to go far for ideas. Sometime in the second half of 2014, Flax and Rosenfield said, they plan to revisit pizza by launching a line of fast-casual pie joints.
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OPINION
July 22, 1990
Rosenfield again shows his ignorance of basic economics. Prop. 103 has not resulted in any auto insurance rate rollbacks since it is impossible to lower a business' prices without also lowering its costs. The only way to lower costs is to crack down on insurance fraud. As a claims adjuster, I can attest that a large number of auto accidents result in fake injury claims, mostly involving "whiplash" pain to the neck and back. In California, a "fender bender" is not considered an accident, but an opportunity.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
The former "Nader's Raider" who used California's initiative process to regulate auto insurance rates is headed back to the ballot. This time he's spoiling to take on health insurers. Harvey Rosenfield, the combative attorney and consumer advocate who wrote California's landmark Proposition 103 more than two decades ago, is preparing a ballot initiative that would force health insurers to get state government approval before they could raise premiums. Stricter controls are needed to put some restraints on a industry that's reaping fat returns for shareholders and multimillion-dollar salaries for executives while consumers struggle to pay for coverage, Rosenfield said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1987
I must say that I am absolutely amazed by all the interest that Rosenfield is trying to engender in yet another heretofore unheard TV melodrama! I would caution Rosenfield against attempting to delude the TV viewing public into believing that "Mistress" has any more substance to it other than aiding CBS to unseat arch-rival NBC on its air date. CHRISTOPHER R. RIDDLE Carlsbad
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1988
It's a pity that Rosenfield's limitations as a writer cause him to tear one actress down in order to build up another. His childish attack on Daryl Hannah was spiteful and completely uncalled for within the context of his puff piece on Debra Winger. Perhaps if Winger moves to New York, Rosenfield will follow. There his mean-spiritedness would be more at home. DON WREGE Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1989
In The Times editorial pages there was an article by Rosenfield and several letters from readers, all complaining about the way Roxani Gillespie has betrayed the intent of Proposition 103 (Aug. 31). I don't know about Rosenfield, but I believe it is likely that many of the persons who voted for 103 and are now disappointed at how it is not being implemented had also voted for George Deukmejian for governor. Since Gillespie is Deukmejian's appointee, these persons are simply getting what they deserve.
OPINION
August 27, 2003
"Davis Still Can Ease Power Rates," by Harvey Rosenfield (Commentary, Aug. 21), is misleading about what happened and what could have happened during California's energy crisis, and what is happening now. Rosenfield accuses the governor of "capitulat[ing] to the blackout blackmail." It is outrageous to suggest that California should have invited power outages. The recent East Coast blackout made clear the consequences resulting from widespread blackouts. Gov. Gray Davis took necessary steps in the face of well-documented manipulation of the energy market to keep the lights on. Davis implemented the nation's most successful conservation program, speeded the licensing of new power plants and entered into long-term contracts at prices one-fifth of what we were then paying, contracts that supported the construction of new power plants.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
Attorneys for the Voter Revolt organization, sponsors of Proposition 103, petitioned the state Supreme Court on Thursday to ban any further insurance rate hikes in California until the court decides on the insurance industry's challenge to the constitutionality of the measure. Voter Revolt Chairman Harvey Rosenfield declared that insurers have taken unfair advantage of the Dec. 7 decision by the court to place a stay on rate rollbacks and price freezes called for in the voter-approved measure.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2011 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
After more than a year of searching for a buyer, California Pizza Kitchen said Wednesday that it would be acquired by the private equity firm Golden Gate Capital for $470 million. If the deal is approved by CPK's shareholders, San Francisco-based Golden Gate will begin to buy out the restaurant chain's shares next month. Golden Gate has also purchased stakes in On the Border Mexican Grill and Romano's Macaroni Grill. It owns a number of retail chains, including Eddie Bauer, Express and J.Jill.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2006 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
For the first time, prominent consumer advocate Harvey Rosenfield is backing a Republican in the race for state insurance commissioner -- a move that may change the odds in the race. Rosenfield, the author of 1988's landmark Proposition 103 auto insurance initiative, has always been considered a Democratic ally. But the party's candidate in the Nov. 7 election is Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante, whom Rosenfield has criticized for trying to water down Proposition 103 while in the state Assembly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2005 | From Associated Press
Maurice Rosenfield, an attorney and Broadway and film producer who introduced a young Robert De Niro to a wide audience, has died. He was 91. He died Oct. 30 of heart failure at his son's home in Lake Forest, Ill., a suburb of his native Chicago, his family said.
OPINION
August 27, 2003
"Davis Still Can Ease Power Rates," by Harvey Rosenfield (Commentary, Aug. 21), is misleading about what happened and what could have happened during California's energy crisis, and what is happening now. Rosenfield accuses the governor of "capitulat[ing] to the blackout blackmail." It is outrageous to suggest that California should have invited power outages. The recent East Coast blackout made clear the consequences resulting from widespread blackouts. Gov. Gray Davis took necessary steps in the face of well-documented manipulation of the energy market to keep the lights on. Davis implemented the nation's most successful conservation program, speeded the licensing of new power plants and entered into long-term contracts at prices one-fifth of what we were then paying, contracts that supported the construction of new power plants.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2003 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
The Brentwood Country Mart has been purchased by a Santa Monica developer who intends to restore the aging retail center in the middle of the affluent Westside neighborhood. James S. Rosenfield bought the property at San Vicente Boulevard and 26th Street in a transaction valued at $30 million. The deal includes the red barn-like structure and a long-term ground lease.
OPINION
December 30, 2002
Re "Insurers Flip the 'Crisis' Switch," Commentary, Dec. 24: Sept. 11, which Harvey Rosenfield dismisses as "[an excuse] for insurance company profiteering," was in fact the largest insured loss in history, more than double the Northridge earthquake. It caused $40.2 billion in insured losses -- four times the number cited for stock market declines that Rosenfield erroneously blames for current insurance conditions. The cost to policyholders of the mold crisis is genuine. In Texas, mold went from a $14-million to a $1-billion problem in only two years.
NEWS
February 27, 2001 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harvey Rosenfield does not mince words when it comes to attacking the power companies that have profited handsomely under California's energy deregulation law. In various interviews, the consumer activist has derided the firms as "pirates and bullies" and even "crooks" using "blackouts to blackmail the state." Despite such rhetoric, a foundation that Rosenfield runs has invested in the nation's largest energy merchant, Houston-based Enron Corp.
NEWS
December 27, 2000 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As power outages and higher utility bills loom in California, Harvey Rosenfield--the man who unsuccessfully fought electricity deregulation four years ago--doesn't say, "I told you so." He says a lot more. "All the people who were on the wrong side are being punished," Rosenfield said. "They're being exposed. Events have proved us right. It's just too bad it has come at this price."
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