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Rosetta

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WORLD
January 20, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Nervous anticipation gave way to jubilation on Monday when the European Space Agency's Rosetta comet-chaser spacecraft emerged from almost three years of induced, energy-saving sleep to report it was ready to carry out its history-making $1 billion mission. Rosetta alerted scientists at the ESA mission control center in Darmstadt, Germany, that it was awake and ready to rev up and rendezvous with the 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet in August. The message sent from the spacecraft still 5.6 million miles from its comet destination reached Earth at 7:18 p.m. Central European Time (11:18 a.m. PST)
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SCIENCE
January 20, 2014 | By Monte Morin
After 31 months of electronic slumber, the Rosetta spacecraft awoke to a pre-programmed alarm Monday and signaled anxious ground controllers that it had indeed woken up on schedule. "This was one alarm clock not to hit snooze on," said Fred Jansen, manager of the European Space Agency 's Rosetta mission. "After a tense day we are absolutely delighted to have our spacecraft awake and back online. " (Watch an animated video of the wake-up sequence here .) PHOTOS: Amazing images from space Rosetta and its on-board lander, Philae, are scheduled to become the first-ever probes to attempt a landing on the surface of a comet this November.
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SCIENCE
January 20, 2014 | By Monte Morin
After 31 months of electronic slumber, the Rosetta spacecraft awoke to a pre-programmed alarm Monday and signaled anxious ground controllers that it had indeed woken up on schedule. "This was one alarm clock not to hit snooze on," said Fred Jansen, manager of the European Space Agency 's Rosetta mission. "After a tense day we are absolutely delighted to have our spacecraft awake and back online. " (Watch an animated video of the wake-up sequence here .) PHOTOS: Amazing images from space Rosetta and its on-board lander, Philae, are scheduled to become the first-ever probes to attempt a landing on the surface of a comet this November.
WORLD
January 20, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Nervous anticipation gave way to jubilation on Monday when the European Space Agency's Rosetta comet-chaser spacecraft emerged from almost three years of induced, energy-saving sleep to report it was ready to carry out its history-making $1 billion mission. Rosetta alerted scientists at the ESA mission control center in Darmstadt, Germany, that it was awake and ready to rev up and rendezvous with the 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet in August. The message sent from the spacecraft still 5.6 million miles from its comet destination reached Earth at 7:18 p.m. Central European Time (11:18 a.m. PST)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2012 | By Dennis Lim
It's hard to imagine now, but the Palme d'Or awarded at Cannes to the Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne for their 1999 movie "Rosetta" stirred considerable controversy. Bewildered that the festival's top prize could go to a rough-hewn indie about the mundane struggles of a sullen trailer-park teenager, some pundits faulted the jury, led by David Cronenberg, for willful obscurantism. In a matter of years, the "Rosetta" win would seem so obvious as to be a no-brainer. The Dardennes have become Cannes fixtures: they took home a second Palme d'Or for 2005's "L'Enfant" and received a runner-up prize last year for "The Kid With a Bike.
SCIENCE
July 10, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Hurtling more than 33,500 miles an hour toward a comet coming from the far reaches of our solar system, a European spacecraft on Saturday will take a relative moment out of its long journey to rendezvous with a mysterious asteroid, 21 Lutetia. Flying to within about 2,000 miles of Lutetia's surface, the Rosetta orbiter will analyze the asteroid's surface and composition to discover whether it's metallic or filled with organic, carbon-based molecules. Rosetta has been on course since 2004 to meet up with Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which is approaching the sun from the outer solar system.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Diane K. Fisher
Besides our one beautiful star, the sun, we have eight planets, several dwarf planets, dozens of moons, millions of asteroids, a trillion comets and — most important of all — us! We call it: our solar system. How did our solar system even get here? What were the ingredients that made the sun and all the planets and other objects? How can we find out? What if we could watch a video and see it all unfold again? When the video starts, we see a huge, wispy cloud of gas and dust swirling slowly throughout a huge region of space.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1996 | Steve Hochman
Everybody knows the story well. The legendary tapes were stuck in a time capsule in 1970--"to thwart bootleggers. And tax authorities"--with instructions that they should not be dug up for 1,000 years. But now, just 26 years later, they've been unearthed, and on Oct. 29 clamoring fans will finally get to hear the long-lost Rutles album, "Archaeology." Rutles frontman Ron Nasty explains the premature release by simply stating, "Things change."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Marie Knight, a gospel singer who came to fame singing duets with gospel-music star Sister Rosetta Tharpe in the late 1940s and made a noteworthy late-in-life comeback as a solo artist, has died. She was 84. Knight died Sunday of complications from pneumonia at a nursing home in Harlem, said her manager, record producer Mark Carpentieri. With a voice that one recent reviewer described as "a natural wonder, an unadorned, powerful instrument," Knight began her career touring the national gospel circuit with evangelist Frances Robinson as a young woman in the mid-1940s.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2001 | Reuters
Merck & Co. said it will acquire biotech company Rosetta Inpharmatics Inc. for about $620 million in hopes its genomic research tools will help speed development of new medicines. The drug giant said it will pay 0.2352 share for each share of Rosetta, representing an 82% premium on Rosetta based on Thursday's closing prices. Rosetta shares rocketed nearly 75%, or $7.43, to close at $17.34 on Nasdaq, while shares of Whitehouse Station, N.J.-based Merck closed off 58 cents at $75.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2012 | By Dennis Lim
It's hard to imagine now, but the Palme d'Or awarded at Cannes to the Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne for their 1999 movie "Rosetta" stirred considerable controversy. Bewildered that the festival's top prize could go to a rough-hewn indie about the mundane struggles of a sullen trailer-park teenager, some pundits faulted the jury, led by David Cronenberg, for willful obscurantism. In a matter of years, the "Rosetta" win would seem so obvious as to be a no-brainer. The Dardennes have become Cannes fixtures: they took home a second Palme d'Or for 2005's "L'Enfant" and received a runner-up prize last year for "The Kid With a Bike.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Diane K. Fisher
Besides our one beautiful star, the sun, we have eight planets, several dwarf planets, dozens of moons, millions of asteroids, a trillion comets and — most important of all — us! We call it: our solar system. How did our solar system even get here? What were the ingredients that made the sun and all the planets and other objects? How can we find out? What if we could watch a video and see it all unfold again? When the video starts, we see a huge, wispy cloud of gas and dust swirling slowly throughout a huge region of space.
OPINION
June 25, 2011 | Patt Morrison
It's as if he has a superhero secret identity: On the Caltech campus, Ahmed Zewail is a mild-mannered Egyptian American professor of chemistry and physics who won the Nobel Prize for cracking the secrets of molecules with femtosecond spectroscopy (a femtosecond is to a second what one second is to 32 million years). In his other identity, he is Egypt's only Nobel laureate in science, a national hero and the inspiration for Egypt's new technical and academic complex, the Zewail City of Science and Technology.
SCIENCE
July 10, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Hurtling more than 33,500 miles an hour toward a comet coming from the far reaches of our solar system, a European spacecraft on Saturday will take a relative moment out of its long journey to rendezvous with a mysterious asteroid, 21 Lutetia. Flying to within about 2,000 miles of Lutetia's surface, the Rosetta orbiter will analyze the asteroid's surface and composition to discover whether it's metallic or filled with organic, carbon-based molecules. Rosetta has been on course since 2004 to meet up with Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which is approaching the sun from the outer solar system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Marie Knight, a gospel singer who came to fame singing duets with gospel-music star Sister Rosetta Tharpe in the late 1940s and made a noteworthy late-in-life comeback as a solo artist, has died. She was 84. Knight died Sunday of complications from pneumonia at a nursing home in Harlem, said her manager, record producer Mark Carpentieri. With a voice that one recent reviewer described as "a natural wonder, an unadorned, powerful instrument," Knight began her career touring the national gospel circuit with evangelist Frances Robinson as a young woman in the mid-1940s.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2007 | Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
Classic blues is something we've heard a lot more of than seen over the years because there is so little footage of the great early blues musicians. "The American Folk Blues Festival: The British Tours" DVD series reminds us of what we've been missing. We not only get to see such vital figures as Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf and Sister Rosetta Tharpe on the just-released Volume 4 in the series, but we also see them at a key period in their careers.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | NEJLA SAMMAKIA, Associated Press
History made Rosetta one of Egypt's best-known places, first as a major seaport for the Ottoman Empire, then as the city that gave its name to the Rosetta Stone, which yielded the key to ancient hieroglyphics. But the Rosetta of today hardly does justice to its rich past. Few pay any attention to its history and the sardines that once gave it wealth vanished 20 years ago--victims of the Aswan High Dam about 750 miles south. The town also languishes in worry about a destructive Mediterranean Sea, which took away its beach three years ago, swallowing up summer cabins and now threatening precious agricultural land.
NEWS
September 26, 1999 | JASPER MORTIMER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In London, they are mounting a show to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the discovery of the Rosetta Stone, the star exhibit in the British Museum. In Egypt, they are mourning the loss of the stone that revolutionized archeology. "It's part of your national heritage. It's something that was left to you by your great-great-grandfathers," said Gaballah Ali Gaballah, head of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities. Gaballah says Egypt dearly wants the Rosetta back.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2007 | Michael Sims, Special to The Times
SO is the title of Andrew Robinson's new book hyperbole? Of course it is. We all know that no one person can encompass all knowledge, that people who aspire to are nothing more than "Jeopardy!" freaks. But now and then, someone comes along who seems to have received several people's share of curiosity and insight and talent. Thomas Jefferson might be a good example.
SCIENCE
March 3, 2004 | From Associated Press
A European rocket blasted off Tuesday on a pioneering 10-year journey to land a probe on a comet and search for clues to the origins of the solar system. The Rosetta spacecraft soared into the skies above South America aboard an Ariane-5 rocket from Kourou, French Guiana. The European Space Agency had scrubbed two scheduled launches last week. After a final countdown, mission control workers in Darmstadt, outside Frankfurt, stared intently into their monitors as the rocket took off.
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