Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRosetta Records
IN THE NEWS

Rosetta Records

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
Female artists have become increasingly prominent in pop, but for Rosetta Reitz there's one group of women musicians who still haven't received the recognition they deserve: the black jazz and blues performers who recorded mainly for the "race record" market from the 1920s through the late '40s. "When the women's movement began, I started to think about questions like why is jazz considered a male domain?" said Reitz, 61, in her Chelsea district apartment here.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO, Dirk Sutro writes about jazz and architecture for the San Diego edition of The Times
She has been a stockbroker, owned a bookstore and a greeting-cards business, written a food column for the Village Voice and authored a best-selling book on menopause. But at 67, Rosetta Reitz has finally settled on her true calling. She is the owner of Rosetta Records, the only recording label exclusively devoted to keeping alive rare jazz and blues by female artists.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO, Dirk Sutro writes about jazz and architecture for the San Diego edition of The Times
She has been a stockbroker, owned a bookstore and a greeting-cards business, written a food column for the Village Voice and authored a best-selling book on menopause. But at 67, Rosetta Reitz has finally settled on her true calling. She is the owner of Rosetta Records, the only recording label exclusively devoted to keeping alive rare jazz and blues by female artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
Female artists have become increasingly prominent in pop, but for Rosetta Reitz there's one group of women musicians who still haven't received the recognition they deserve: the black jazz and blues performers who recorded mainly for the "race record" market from the 1920s through the late '40s. "When the women's movement began, I started to think about questions like why is jazz considered a male domain?" said Reitz, 61, in her Chelsea district apartment here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2008 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rosetta Reitz, 84, an ardent feminist who was the founder and owner of Rosetta Records, the label devoted to keeping alive works by female jazz and blues artists, died Nov. 1 of cardiopulmonary disease at St. Vincent's Hospital in New York City. Reitz had been a stockbroker, owned a bookstore and a greeting-card business, written a book on menopause and a food column for the Village Voice when, at 67, she found her true calling and started the label with $10,000 she borrowed from friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's that time once again for area jazz players to metaphorically lock horns or keyboards or guitars, for that matter--in the annual the Hennessy Cognac Jazz Search, a talent competition. "I am looking forward to hearing some great new talent in 1991," said "Tonight Show" Orchestra leader/trumpeter Doc Severinsen, who will serve as Hennessy's national judge and host, in a press release.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz players battle for recognition, even more so when they are women. After more than 50 years in the music business, critically acclaimed pianist Dorothy Donegan is receiving some of the attention that might have been accorded her years ago had she been male. In January, Donegan, 69, was elected to the prestigious Jazz Masters Hall of Fame, an honor that carried with it a $20,000 grant Donegan can use as she pleases.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|