Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRosetta Tharpe
IN THE NEWS

Rosetta Tharpe

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2006
NEXT time, perhaps, you might choose to critique the term "divas," greatly overused in popular publications and by those in the music industry. If these young female musicians are as thoughtful as you maintain, they may have a more critical perspective about the injudicious use of that word. Second, I might recommend Maureen Mahon's "Right to Rock" about the black rock coalition, which forecasts many of the insights you mentioned. One might infer from your suggestion that these artists appropriate folk-rock musical styles, that there is no black tradition of "folk" (meaning acoustic guitar-singer)
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Marie Knight, a gospel singer who came to fame singing duets with gospel-music star Sister Rosetta Tharpe in the late 1940s and made a noteworthy late-in-life comeback as a solo artist, has died. She was 84. Knight died Sunday of complications from pneumonia at a nursing home in Harlem, said her manager, record producer Mark Carpentieri. With a voice that one recent reviewer described as "a natural wonder, an unadorned, powerful instrument," Knight began her career touring the national gospel circuit with evangelist Frances Robinson as a young woman in the mid-1940s.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Marie Knight, a gospel singer who came to fame singing duets with gospel-music star Sister Rosetta Tharpe in the late 1940s and made a noteworthy late-in-life comeback as a solo artist, has died. She was 84. Knight died Sunday of complications from pneumonia at a nursing home in Harlem, said her manager, record producer Mark Carpentieri. With a voice that one recent reviewer described as "a natural wonder, an unadorned, powerful instrument," Knight began her career touring the national gospel circuit with evangelist Frances Robinson as a young woman in the mid-1940s.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2007 | Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
Classic blues is something we've heard a lot more of than seen over the years because there is so little footage of the great early blues musicians. "The American Folk Blues Festival: The British Tours" DVD series reminds us of what we've been missing. We not only get to see such vital figures as Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf and Sister Rosetta Tharpe on the just-released Volume 4 in the series, but we also see them at a key period in their careers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2007 | Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
Classic blues is something we've heard a lot more of than seen over the years because there is so little footage of the great early blues musicians. "The American Folk Blues Festival: The British Tours" DVD series reminds us of what we've been missing. We not only get to see such vital figures as Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf and Sister Rosetta Tharpe on the just-released Volume 4 in the series, but we also see them at a key period in their careers.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2008 | From Reuters
More than a dozen recording artists, including the estates of Count Basie and Benny Goodman, sued Universal Music on Friday, saying they had been cheated out of more than $6 million in royalties since 1998. The artists, many of whom signed with recording companies that were later bought by Universal, sued the world's largest music label for breach of contract and breach of fiduciary duty in an action filed in New York state's court system.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1987 | DON HECKMAN
It's been a scandalous 30 years since singer/pianist Nellie Lutcher has released a new recording--even longer since she startled the pop world with her joyously bouncy, slightly risque hits "Hurry on Down" and "Real Gone Guy." But if her performance at the Cinegrill on Tuesday night was any indication, the intervening decades haven't taken an iota away from her utterly unique skills.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2004
I had to shake my head as I read David Segal's article about where all the great guitar goddesses were ("Lead Guitar: Boys Rule," Aug. 28). His statement that Bonnie Raitt "didn't pioneer a style or push the instrument to places it hadn't been" was laughable. You mean to tell me a searing blast of Raitt-driven slide guitar isn't instantly recognizable? It's just ludicrous to say there have been no other female guitarists of merit in the last 3 1/2 decades. Besides Raitt and Nancy Wilson of Heart (who was also sort of smugly dismissed in the article)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1996 | ROBERT HILBURN
Gospel is such a glorious musical tradition that Shanachie could probably put out 50 volumes in this series and still not run out of soul-stirring material. There are 33 tracks here and each is a wonder. Among the highlights: * Mahalia Jackson's "What Could I Do." Jackson is the most famous gospel singer of all, and her four selections here were taken from the New Orleans native's sessions at tiny Apollo Records in the late 1940s and early '50s.
NEWS
November 4, 1998 | LYNELL GEORGE
With the grand flourish of a maestro's baton, Duke Ellington inscribed this on our collective consciousness: "A man worships with a drum same as he does with a harp. Every man prays in his own language, and there's no language that God does not understand."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2006
NEXT time, perhaps, you might choose to critique the term "divas," greatly overused in popular publications and by those in the music industry. If these young female musicians are as thoughtful as you maintain, they may have a more critical perspective about the injudicious use of that word. Second, I might recommend Maureen Mahon's "Right to Rock" about the black rock coalition, which forecasts many of the insights you mentioned. One might infer from your suggestion that these artists appropriate folk-rock musical styles, that there is no black tradition of "folk" (meaning acoustic guitar-singer)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Matt Cooper
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Feb. 17 - 23, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies       SUNDAY So the Lakers are having a lousy season. But teammates Kobe Bryant and Dwight Howard will be hitting the court with the rest of the league's best at the "2013 NBA All-Star Game," where singer Alicia Keys will rock the halftime show. (TNT, 5 p.m.) Billy Campbell has the unenviable task of following in two-time Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis' footsteps when he portrays our nation's 16th president in "Killing Lincoln," a new docudrama based on the book by Bill O'Reilly.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If you don't know gospel music, really know it, you are missing out on a lot, but don't lose faith. "Rejoice and Shout," a vibrant and comprehensive new documentary will take you there in style. Directed by Don McGlynn, who had access to producer Joe Lauro's huge 10,000-hour collection of American music on film and video, "Rejoice" provides both a melodic education and a once-in-a-lifetime concert in one soul-stirring package. "Rejoice and Shout" not only has the music, it has strong interviews with top gospel authorities such as Anthony Heilbut, Bill Carpenter and Jacquie Gales Webb, plus incisive comments by headliner gospel singers like Mavis Staples of the breakout Staple Singers and Ira Tucker, who joined the Dixie Hummingbirds in 1938 at age 13 and stayed for 70 years.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|