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October 16, 1994 | Eric Harrison, Eric Harrison is the Times' Atlanta bureau chief
Minnie Lee Langley was 9 years old when the world as she knew it came to an end. She had been born into an uncommonly independent African-American community on Florida's upper Gulf Coast just before World War I. Langley lived with her grandparents, and her prosperous extended family had a fine two-story house nearby, with a piano in the parlor and books on the shelves. But in one week in 1923, all that was gone.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1997 | STEPHAN FORTES, NEWSDAY
Ving Rhames gets adamant when the subject of typecasting comes up. He wants to be seen as an actor and not as a type. Yet it's precisely when the subject comes up that he most resembles the parts he's known for: the scary crime lord Marcellus in "Pulp Fiction," the scowling bouncer in "Striptease," the enigmatic cyber-whiz in "Mission: Impossible." He's gotten plenty of praise for mastering such supporting roles, even in the woebegotten "Striptease."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1997 | STEPHAN FORTES, NEWSDAY
Ving Rhames gets adamant when the subject of typecasting comes up. He wants to be seen as an actor and not as a type. Yet it's precisely when the subject comes up that he most resembles the parts he's known for: the scary crime lord Marcellus in "Pulp Fiction," the scowling bouncer in "Striptease," the enigmatic cyber-whiz in "Mission: Impossible." He's gotten plenty of praise for mastering such supporting roles, even in the woebegotten "Striptease."
MAGAZINE
October 16, 1994 | Eric Harrison, Eric Harrison is the Times' Atlanta bureau chief
Minnie Lee Langley was 9 years old when the world as she knew it came to an end. She had been born into an uncommonly independent African-American community on Florida's upper Gulf Coast just before World War I. Langley lived with her grandparents, and her prosperous extended family had a fine two-story house nearby, with a piano in the parlor and books on the shelves. But in one week in 1923, all that was gone.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2007 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
Grafton Peterson returned from the funeral home and found his wife, Celeste, in their living room trading stories about their teenage daughter, Erin, with neighbors and friends. He took his wife aside. In a calm voice, he described what he had seen at the funeral home. Erin had been shot several times. She probably died instantly. Her face was untouched. Celeste sobbed. Grafton retreated to the basement he finished for Erin's high school graduation party last year.
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