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Rosh Hashanah

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September 15, 1990
Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, will begin this year on Wednesday evening, launching Judaism's reflective Holy High Days, which culminate with Yom Kippur on Sept. 29. TRADITION: The Jewish New Year is a solemn time in which each person's fate is said to be subject to review and judgment in the divine "Book of Life," thus a greeting in Hebrew that translates, "May you be inscribed for a good year."
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NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Jenn Harris
It's the beginning of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, and during the last couple of weeks the Times Test Kitchen has been busy testing recipes for the story " Rosh Hashanah Feasts Center on Sweet Harvest . " Recipes include an apple date honey cake, sauteed apples and black-eyed peas with leeks and chard.  During our Monday morning #Weekendeats chat, some participants shared the dishes they made for the holiday. Here are the highlights: Shulie Madnick of the blog Food Wanderings shared a recipe for her apple bourbon bundt cake.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1995 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO
Jewish congregations throughout Ventura County are planning special activities to observe Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, which begins Sunday. K'hilat Ha'Aloneem, Jewish Community of the Oaks, will host two guest rabbis Sunday and Monday at the Jewish Community Center in Ojai. Rabbis Arthur Gross Schaefer of Santa Barbara and Judith HaLevy of Los Angeles will take part in services on Rosh Hashanah Eve Sunday and on Monday morning. The Jewish Community Center is at 619 W. El Roblar Drive.
FOOD
September 15, 2012 | Faye and Yakir Levy, Faye Levy is the author of "Feast From the Mideast."
It seems like Rosh Hashanah customs were created by lovers of fruits and vegetables. Most families will begin Sunday night's holiday dinner with apple wedges dipped in honey to symbolize the hope for a sweet new year, and many serve sweet vegetables, especially carrots and sweet potatoes. We like the Sephardi custom of starting the meal with a mini-Seder, a ritual derived from the Talmud. Guests sample small portions of certain vegetables and fruits, such as pumpkin, leeks, chard, black-eyed peas, pomegranate seeds and dates, and say a blessing with each one. The choices vary depending on what's available at the market -- pumpkin might be replaced by other squashes, black-eyed peas by other beans, and chard by beet leaves or spinach.
FOOD
September 24, 1992 | FAYE LEVY, Levy is the author of "Faye Levy's International Jewish Cookbook."
Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, which begins this year at sundown on Sunday, is traditionally a time of reflection on the past year. This year, however, many Jews' thoughts will go back 500 years. While much of the New World is celebrating Columbus' discovery, Jews remember another event of 1492--the expulsion of the Jews from Spain.
FOOD
September 22, 2011 | By Phyllis Glazer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It doesn't matter whether you were born in Brooklyn or Borneo — if you're Jewish you'll probably include honey on your shopping list for Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, which begins on the evening of Sept. 28. Like most Jewish holidays, Rosh Hashanah is celebrated by extensive praying and expansive eating, but it is the only holiday in which honey plays a starring role. On Rosh Hashanah, it's not enough just to wish our brethren a "Happy New Year" — tradition holds that we wish them a sweet year as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1990 | GEORGE FRANK
At sunset today, many of the estimated 100,000 Jews in Orange County will begin celebrating Rosh Hashanah, a two-day holiday that begins a 10-day period of repentance that culminates in Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is a time for introspection and a time for taking stock, said Rabbi Mark Miller of Temple Bat Yahm in Newport Beach.
NEWS
September 20, 1990
Schools in the Beverly Hills Unified School District will be closed today and Friday for Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year. City offices will remain open. Rosh Hashanah, which began at sundown Wednesday, is followed by the 10 Days of Awe, a traditional period of prayer and atonement, that ends with Yom Kippur, on Sept. 28.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1989 | LYNN SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Students of Rabbi Daniel Epstein's crash course in Hebrew are cramming for their first major test. The students--including children, lawyers and computer specialists--have learned Hebrew phonetics and the meanings of religious phrases. They have been taught that apples and honey symbolize the sweetness of a new year. Some have even tried to blow the shofar, a wind instrument made from a ram's horn that signifies spiritual awakening during the High Holy Days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1993 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the years, the efforts of Dr. Sabri Al Farrah and David Baron to persuade local Palestinians and Jews to talk over their differences always met the same harsh fate. After a few months of discussions, an outbreak of violence in the Middle East would invariably destroy whatever goodwill had been built up and create even greater distrust and misunderstanding. Until now.
FOOD
September 22, 2011 | By Phyllis Glazer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It doesn't matter whether you were born in Brooklyn or Borneo — if you're Jewish you'll probably include honey on your shopping list for Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, which begins on the evening of Sept. 28. Like most Jewish holidays, Rosh Hashanah is celebrated by extensive praying and expansive eating, but it is the only holiday in which honey plays a starring role. On Rosh Hashanah, it's not enough just to wish our brethren a "Happy New Year" — tradition holds that we wish them a sweet year as well.
SPORTS
June 7, 2010 | Eric Sondheimer
Tradition has been squeezed out by budget belt tightening in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Two football traditions — opening night on the Friday of the first full week of September and playing second-round playoff games the night before Thanksgiving — will end in the fall because of district-mandated work furlough days. "It's always an adventure," Michael Immken, Chatsworth High's athletic director, said of the LAUSD. City Section schools can't play host to games Sept.
WORLD
September 20, 2009 | Mark Magnier
It's not easy representing centuries of Jewish tradition single-handedly. Especially if you're in a war-torn Muslim country. But Zebulon Simantov, who claims to be the last Jew in Afghanistan, is doing his best. At the start of this weekend's Jewish New Year, he lighted three candles, changed into a traditional Afghan shalwar kameez outfit and black yarmulke, navigated around his Muslim helper as he wrapped up his Ramadan prayers and, for the next 45 minutes, swayed, bowed and intoned Rosh Hashanah prayers as an Indian game show blared from a corner TV. "I'm the only Jew in Afghanistan," the 57-year-old said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2000 | ARON TENDLER, Rabbi Aron Tendler is senior rabbi at Shaarey Zedek Congregation in North Hollywood and an executive board member of the Rabbinical Council of California
On Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, we pray that we will be healthy and well. We pray for financial success, family happiness and personal contentment. We also pray for community. We pray for communal safety, continued growth and overall world peace. When the Metropolitan Transportation Authority announced that it was again considering a mass transit system down the middle of Chandler Boulevard, I felt that my prayers were left unanswered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2000 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aryeh Fein put a gnarled ram's horn to his lips and blew until veins stood out on his forehead. The 10-year-old from Rancho Santa Margarita sounded the shofar Friday morning to herald the start of Rosh Hashana in a program sponsored by Morasha Jewish Day School in Mission Viejo. "I blew it a little too long," Aryeh said, sitting in the grass until his dizziness passed. "It's cool because it makes so much noise."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2000 | GENA PASILLAS
Congregation Shir Ha-Ma'alot, a Reform Jewish synagogue in Irvine, will offer a number of special services for the High Holy Days, which begin at sundown Friday and usher in the Hebrew calendar year of 5761. To prepare for the Days of Awe during the Hebrew month of Elul, penitential prayers will be offered during the outdoor Selichot Service at 11 p.m. today. The 10-day period of self-examination begins with Rosh Hashanah service at 8 p.m. Friday.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | JOHN MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
An error in scheduling that starts the next Santa Monica-Malibu school year on one of the holiest days of the Jewish calender outraged at least one Jewish leader who debated the decision with school board officials at a meeting this week. The school board scheduled teachers to return from summer vacation Sept. 12 and students to return the next day. But the two days are also Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Rabbi Jeffrey A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1985 | DOUG SMITH, Times Staff Writer
It was the Day of Awe, the day of Sounding of the Horn, the solemn beginning of the Jewish religious year. A congregation of about 85 listened to the rabbi who stood before them in a black suit with a red velvet yarmulke on his head and a white wool prayer shawl around his shoulders. He spoke softly, in a matter-of-fact cadence. Then, at one point, he stopped and cast a puzzled expression at the two young women cantors standing to his right. They returned the look.
SPORTS
October 5, 1999 | MAL FLORENCE
Before the New York Jets played the Denver Broncos on Sunday, a survival game between teams with 0-3 records, Shaun Powell of Newsday had this observation on Jet Coach Bill Parcells: "If the Jets lose to a winless, desperate Bronco team and go on through the middle of October without a victory, then it'll be a poor reflection of a Hall of Fame-bound coach. "Maybe you'll then wonder if Parcells has lost it, and it wouldn't be an unfair suspicion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1999 | JUDY SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rosh Hashana, the Jewish new year celebrated last week, and Yom Kippur, the day of fasting and prayer that begins Sunday at sundown, are traditionally times reserved for introspection. For worshipers, that often entails an assessment and spiritual inventory of the year. For rabbis, the holidays provide a chance to speak to the biggest crowd of the year on the most critical spiritual and political topics.
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